Date   

Re: BLUMENFELD from Burgsteinfurt #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Bernhard BLUMENFELD, born in Osnabrueck, lived in Burgsteinfurt (which is
my home town) >from the 1840s to the 1880s. He married Feibes Itzig's sister.
The two men were of greatest importance for the modern development of this
city. E.g. with their money and influence they were worked for the building of
a railway line. Later he lived in Muenster.

To receive more information I propose to contact the Stadtarchiv Steinfurt,
which is the modern name: mailto:<kloetzer@...>
Website http://www.stadt-steinfurt.de

Freundlicher Gruss Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buck@...

Mr. Buck will lecture on German Jewish archival research and participate in
the GerSIG program during the 27th IAJGS International Conference
on Jewish Genealogy Salt Lake City July 15-20, 2007 www.slc2007.org


Correction to Landsmen re Szaki records filmed by the Mormons #general

Nicki Russler <nrussler@...>
 

The "Landsmen" Editor, Marlene Silverman, asked me to post a correction
to page 4 of the most recent issue [Vol. 16 - Nos. 3-4] as follows:

In fact the Mormons -- on their visits to Vilnius -- in 2002-2002 --
filmed various Szaki Jewish vital records. Most of them were Births (>from
1842-1887) with several large gaps. They also filmed a small number of
Deaths (c1892-1907) and a small number of Marriages (c1885-1911).

For a complete list of those records, refer to :

<www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/VilnaMicrofilmsIndex.htm>

Nicki Russler
Knoxville, Tennessee
on behalf of the Suwalk-Lomza SIG


German SIG #Germany Re: BLUMENFELD from Burgsteinfurt #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Bernhard BLUMENFELD, born in Osnabrueck, lived in Burgsteinfurt (which is
my home town) >from the 1840s to the 1880s. He married Feibes Itzig's sister.
The two men were of greatest importance for the modern development of this
city. E.g. with their money and influence they were worked for the building of
a railway line. Later he lived in Muenster.

To receive more information I propose to contact the Stadtarchiv Steinfurt,
which is the modern name: mailto:<kloetzer@...>
Website http://www.stadt-steinfurt.de

Freundlicher Gruss Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buck@...

Mr. Buck will lecture on German Jewish archival research and participate in
the GerSIG program during the 27th IAJGS International Conference
on Jewish Genealogy Salt Lake City July 15-20, 2007 www.slc2007.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Correction to Landsmen re Szaki records filmed by the Mormons #general

Nicki Russler <nrussler@...>
 

The "Landsmen" Editor, Marlene Silverman, asked me to post a correction
to page 4 of the most recent issue [Vol. 16 - Nos. 3-4] as follows:

In fact the Mormons -- on their visits to Vilnius -- in 2002-2002 --
filmed various Szaki Jewish vital records. Most of them were Births (>from
1842-1887) with several large gaps. They also filmed a small number of
Deaths (c1892-1907) and a small number of Marriages (c1885-1911).

For a complete list of those records, refer to :

<www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/VilnaMicrofilmsIndex.htm>

Nicki Russler
Knoxville, Tennessee
on behalf of the Suwalk-Lomza SIG


Need help with Russian Revision list entry #general

joyweave
 

Could someone familiar with the Russian Revision lists on JewishGen help me
understand the following entry?

place: Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius [don't need help with that]

names: TUBIASH Movsha son of Aron age 24 head of h/h
TUBIASH Ovsei son of Movsha age 12
TUBIASH Shmerko son of Movsha age 1834-6

date of revision: 6 November 1850

all ages are "as of last revision" with blanks for "this revision"
all names are followed by the note: became a farmer in 1841

I can't find the date of the "last revision" either within this listing or on
the "more information" chart of LDS films. For this town, there's nothing
entered for the 19th century.

I am trying to determine the birth years. Even without knowing what year the
last revision was, it looks like Movsha was 12 years old when Ovsei was born.
And why does Shmerko's specify 1834? Were the other two >from a different
revision date?

I'll be thankful for any suggestions about what these ages mean.

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help with Russian Revision list entry #general

joyweave
 

Could someone familiar with the Russian Revision lists on JewishGen help me
understand the following entry?

place: Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius [don't need help with that]

names: TUBIASH Movsha son of Aron age 24 head of h/h
TUBIASH Ovsei son of Movsha age 12
TUBIASH Shmerko son of Movsha age 1834-6

date of revision: 6 November 1850

all ages are "as of last revision" with blanks for "this revision"
all names are followed by the note: became a farmer in 1841

I can't find the date of the "last revision" either within this listing or on
the "more information" chart of LDS films. For this town, there's nothing
entered for the 19th century.

I am trying to determine the birth years. Even without knowing what year the
last revision was, it looks like Movsha was 12 years old when Ovsei was born.
And why does Shmerko's specify 1834? Were the other two >from a different
revision date?

I'll be thankful for any suggestions about what these ages mean.

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA


Re: passenger list assistance #general

joyweave
 

Sheri,

I may be wrong about this and hope someone will correct me if I am, but >from
some other research I've done, I suspect that a man who was in the US for the
required time period could petition for his wife and children along with himself
even if they had not yet arrived.

I'd suggest broadening your time period up to the date of Elizabeth's death.

I'd also try the town with "Sounds like Berdichev" and "Starts with Bred or with
Bird or Brid" because a hand-written r can look like an i or e. In addition,
try the District or the Gubernia in place of the town. Many people gave those
designations as last residence.

Do the children show up in the 1920 census? If so, when do they say they arrived?

Good luck!

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA

Sheri wrote:
I have been searching for my grandmother's passenger list for about fifteen

years. I have searched everywhere I can think of, with as many variations
as I can think of, but have never been able to find it. I don't know what
else to do, so I'm hoping someone here can come up with some new ideas.

My grandmother was born in Berdichev, Russia. Most of her family immigrated
to Dayton, Ohio, before she, her mother and brother came. She told me she
arrived at the port of New York. Their names, Americanized, were Elizabeth
(mother), Sophia and Charles Skilken. I suspect they were listed on the
passenger list under their Hebrew names, though I don't know what they were,
other than my grandmother's name might have been Zipporah. Their ages would
have been approximately 26 (Elizabeth), 5 (Sophia) and 8 (Charles).

I have narrowed their arrival to the period between April 22, 1910 (the 1910
census, where my great grandfather Ralph/Rachmiel was listed as "single" and
was listed as a boarder at his mother's house) and January 3, 1911 (Ralph's
petition for naturalization, which includes his wife and children but
doesn't say when they arrived). Elizabeth died in 1912 but her death
certificate doesn't mention how long she had been in the country, state or
city.

I have searched all the passenger list indexes (on microfilm as well as the
ones on A******y and Ellis Island records) for any spelling variations I
could think of, as well as "starts with" options on Steven Morse's sites. I
have searched by location for all passengers >from Berdichev (using towns
beginning with Berd as my search criterion).

So aside >from looking at every passenger manifest, line by line, for those
eight months, what else can I do? Help!!!!!!!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: passenger list assistance #general

joyweave
 

Sheri,

I may be wrong about this and hope someone will correct me if I am, but >from
some other research I've done, I suspect that a man who was in the US for the
required time period could petition for his wife and children along with himself
even if they had not yet arrived.

I'd suggest broadening your time period up to the date of Elizabeth's death.

I'd also try the town with "Sounds like Berdichev" and "Starts with Bred or with
Bird or Brid" because a hand-written r can look like an i or e. In addition,
try the District or the Gubernia in place of the town. Many people gave those
designations as last residence.

Do the children show up in the 1920 census? If so, when do they say they arrived?

Good luck!

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA

Sheri wrote:
I have been searching for my grandmother's passenger list for about fifteen

years. I have searched everywhere I can think of, with as many variations
as I can think of, but have never been able to find it. I don't know what
else to do, so I'm hoping someone here can come up with some new ideas.

My grandmother was born in Berdichev, Russia. Most of her family immigrated
to Dayton, Ohio, before she, her mother and brother came. She told me she
arrived at the port of New York. Their names, Americanized, were Elizabeth
(mother), Sophia and Charles Skilken. I suspect they were listed on the
passenger list under their Hebrew names, though I don't know what they were,
other than my grandmother's name might have been Zipporah. Their ages would
have been approximately 26 (Elizabeth), 5 (Sophia) and 8 (Charles).

I have narrowed their arrival to the period between April 22, 1910 (the 1910
census, where my great grandfather Ralph/Rachmiel was listed as "single" and
was listed as a boarder at his mother's house) and January 3, 1911 (Ralph's
petition for naturalization, which includes his wife and children but
doesn't say when they arrived). Elizabeth died in 1912 but her death
certificate doesn't mention how long she had been in the country, state or
city.

I have searched all the passenger list indexes (on microfilm as well as the
ones on A******y and Ellis Island records) for any spelling variations I
could think of, as well as "starts with" options on Steven Morse's sites. I
have searched by location for all passengers >from Berdichev (using towns
beginning with Berd as my search criterion).

So aside >from looking at every passenger manifest, line by line, for those
eight months, what else can I do? Help!!!!!!!


Re: How to find the town of Zell #germany

Janet Isenberg <jbisenberg@...>
 

In addition to the sources suggested by Roger Lustig, it is always a
good idea to refer to:

"Where Once We Walked" by Gary Mokotoff & Sallyann Amdur Sack
The Soundex for Zell could include 43 variations on Zell. Only one of
the Zells in Germany is listed as having had a Jewish population in
1929. It had 34 Jews. The town is 101 km south of Koln; (Koeln / Cologne)
50 02/07 11 longitude/latitude; you can references to this town in the
Encyclopedia Judaica, Pinkas Hakehillot (Encyclopedia of Communities):
Germany-Bavaria and in a Yizkor Book for the town.

"A Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames" by Lars Menk
MITAU 1) Etymology: Toponym >from Mitau, the German name for the town
Jelgava, Latvia. 3) After 1800: Dargun, Demmin, MVP (1813 from
Jelgava); Teterow, Guestrow, MVP (18.. >from Dargun)
SCHREIBER is a much more popular name with a list of about 27 towns
where the name was found. None of them include Zell, Mitau, Jelgava,
Dargun or Teterow.

Additionally, I suggest you visit the website of the Center for
Jewish History. They seem to have several items that might be of
interest to you.

Janet Isenberg Glen Rock, NJ

Sheri Drew sheri.drew@... wrote:
I am researching the MITAU family who was living in Hamburg, Germany,
during the 1850's. On the birth certificates of the children, it lists
the mother's maiden name as SCHREIBER, and claims her place of birth
as Zell. There are almost 40 Zell's in Germany alone, and others in
Switzerland and France. Are there any ideas how to pinpoint the
correct town of birth so that I can find the Schreiber family?


German SIG #Germany Re: How to find the town of Zell #germany

Janet Isenberg <jbisenberg@...>
 

In addition to the sources suggested by Roger Lustig, it is always a
good idea to refer to:

"Where Once We Walked" by Gary Mokotoff & Sallyann Amdur Sack
The Soundex for Zell could include 43 variations on Zell. Only one of
the Zells in Germany is listed as having had a Jewish population in
1929. It had 34 Jews. The town is 101 km south of Koln; (Koeln / Cologne)
50 02/07 11 longitude/latitude; you can references to this town in the
Encyclopedia Judaica, Pinkas Hakehillot (Encyclopedia of Communities):
Germany-Bavaria and in a Yizkor Book for the town.

"A Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames" by Lars Menk
MITAU 1) Etymology: Toponym >from Mitau, the German name for the town
Jelgava, Latvia. 3) After 1800: Dargun, Demmin, MVP (1813 from
Jelgava); Teterow, Guestrow, MVP (18.. >from Dargun)
SCHREIBER is a much more popular name with a list of about 27 towns
where the name was found. None of them include Zell, Mitau, Jelgava,
Dargun or Teterow.

Additionally, I suggest you visit the website of the Center for
Jewish History. They seem to have several items that might be of
interest to you.

Janet Isenberg Glen Rock, NJ

Sheri Drew sheri.drew@... wrote:
I am researching the MITAU family who was living in Hamburg, Germany,
during the 1850's. On the birth certificates of the children, it lists
the mother's maiden name as SCHREIBER, and claims her place of birth
as Zell. There are almost 40 Zell's in Germany alone, and others in
Switzerland and France. Are there any ideas how to pinpoint the
correct town of birth so that I can find the Schreiber family?


survivors from Pidhaitsi District #galicia

Galicia Forever <vladis@...>
 

Dear all!

I'm researching on Jews >from village Byzykow in Pidhaitsi district
-- nearby of Monasterzyska.

Do you know if something similar (like Monasterzyska Survivors List)
exists about survivors of the district of Pidhaitsi?

Many Thanks
Vladimir Semenov, MD
Lvov Ukraine

Judy Kloogman Weinstein <KLOOGWEIN@...> wrote:

A document >from the AJDC Landsmanshaftn Dept. in the YIVO Archives
in New York City (RG 335.7) has a list of 43 survivors of the Shoah
from Monasterzyska, who were residing in the region of Lower Silesia,
Poland in 1946. It includes the survivor's name, the parents' given
names, age, occupation, address in 1946.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia survivors from Pidhaitsi District #galicia

Galicia Forever <vladis@...>
 

Dear all!

I'm researching on Jews >from village Byzykow in Pidhaitsi district
-- nearby of Monasterzyska.

Do you know if something similar (like Monasterzyska Survivors List)
exists about survivors of the district of Pidhaitsi?

Many Thanks
Vladimir Semenov, MD
Lvov Ukraine

Judy Kloogman Weinstein <KLOOGWEIN@...> wrote:

A document >from the AJDC Landsmanshaftn Dept. in the YIVO Archives
in New York City (RG 335.7) has a list of 43 survivors of the Shoah
from Monasterzyska, who were residing in the region of Lower Silesia,
Poland in 1946. It includes the survivor's name, the parents' given
names, age, occupation, address in 1946.


LI-RA-MA database completed #austria-czech

Donna Dinberg <blacknus@...>
 

Posted on behalf of Library and Archives Canada.

---
Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the completion of
the database of the Likacheff-Ragosine-Mathers (LI-RA-MA) collection.
Created between 1898 and 1922 by the consular offices of the Tsarist
Russian Empire in Canada, the approximately 11,400 files pertain to
Jewish, Ukrainian and Finnish immigrants who came to Canada >from many
locations within the Russian Empire. The files include passport
applications, identity papers and questionnaires containing general
information. Since the initial release of the database in October
2006, 35,000 digitized images have been added, bringing the total
number of images to 55,000.

The LI-RA-MA collection is located at:
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/li-ra-ma/index-e.html

Click the "Search" link on the left to search the database.

The LI-RA-MA database is one of several launched recently as part of
LAC's "Moving Here, Staying Here" project. You are invited to visit
the site at: http://www.collectionscanada.ca/immigrants.

The contributions of many LAC staff were instrumental in the success of
this project, and their efforts are much appreciated. For more
information, please contact the Project Manager, Angele Alain, at
webservices@...


---
Posted on behalf of Library and Archives Canada by:

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
blacknus@...


Second Annual A-C Israel SIG Get-together #austria-czech

Paul King <samorai@...>
 

In light of last year's successful gathering, Israel Austria-Czech SIG
members are planning a tentative repeat get-together at Beit Terezin on
Friday April 27, 10:00 a.m to 2:00 p.m. For further information, interested
Israelis and visitors >from abroad at this time may contact one of the two
people listed below:

Paul King: samorai@...
Uri Meretz: meretz@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Second Annual A-C Israel SIG Get-together #austria-czech

Paul King <samorai@...>
 

In light of last year's successful gathering, Israel Austria-Czech SIG
members are planning a tentative repeat get-together at Beit Terezin on
Friday April 27, 10:00 a.m to 2:00 p.m. For further information, interested
Israelis and visitors >from abroad at this time may contact one of the two
people listed below:

Paul King: samorai@...
Uri Meretz: meretz@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech LI-RA-MA database completed #austria-czech

Donna Dinberg <blacknus@...>
 

Posted on behalf of Library and Archives Canada.

---
Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the completion of
the database of the Likacheff-Ragosine-Mathers (LI-RA-MA) collection.
Created between 1898 and 1922 by the consular offices of the Tsarist
Russian Empire in Canada, the approximately 11,400 files pertain to
Jewish, Ukrainian and Finnish immigrants who came to Canada >from many
locations within the Russian Empire. The files include passport
applications, identity papers and questionnaires containing general
information. Since the initial release of the database in October
2006, 35,000 digitized images have been added, bringing the total
number of images to 55,000.

The LI-RA-MA collection is located at:
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/li-ra-ma/index-e.html

Click the "Search" link on the left to search the database.

The LI-RA-MA database is one of several launched recently as part of
LAC's "Moving Here, Staying Here" project. You are invited to visit
the site at: http://www.collectionscanada.ca/immigrants.

The contributions of many LAC staff were instrumental in the success of
this project, and their efforts are much appreciated. For more
information, please contact the Project Manager, Angele Alain, at
webservices@...


---
Posted on behalf of Library and Archives Canada by:

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
blacknus@...


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland IAJGS Conference -- Bad Arolsen, "Finding our Fathers", DNA and more #warsaw #poland

information@slc2007.org <information@...>
 

The 27th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is
planning a wide range of programs to complement the outstanding
research opportunities at the Family History Library.

The Conference's opening session, on July 15th, will feature Paul A.
Shapiro, director of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He will discuss the history of
efforts to open the International Tracing Services' Archives at Bad
Arolsen to researchers, the Archive's holdings, digitization of its
records and the current state of access. These archives contain
millions of documents on Holocaust victims which have been
generally inaccessible to researchers.

The Banquet, on July 19th, will feature Dan Rottenberg, speaking on
his book, "Finding Our Fathers," on the 30th anniversary of its
publication. When Finding Our Fathers: A Guidebook to Jewish
Genealogy appeared in 1977, following the Roots series and Kunta
Kinte, a mass of people realized that they could also trace their
families and the modern Jewish genealogy movement was launched.

If you are a DNA or genetics junkie then Wednesday, July 18th,
will be your day! There will be a series of genetic-oriented programs
from morning through evening, including Syd Mandelbaum's "Helping
to Find Those Who Were Lost, The DNA Shoah Project," Bennett
Greenspan's "Genetics 2007," Jon Entine's "Abraham's Children:
Race, Identity, & the DNA of 'The Chosen People'" and Gary Frohlich's,
"Our Heritage & Our Health-Genetic Conditions Among the Ashkenazim".
The day will include extensive Q&A sessions and a DNA collection. Still
not enough? There will be yet more on Friday morning with Herbert
Huebscher's "DNA and Classic Genealogy Join to Solve Genealogical Puzzle".
These are only a sampling of the 120+ programs that will be offered during
the conference. While you will find some of your favorites, many of the
presentations will be new.

To learn more about conference programming, research at the Family
History Library, the conference film festival, its unique photographic
exhibit, exciting things to do in Utah and much more, check out the
conference website at www.slc2007.org. You can register for the
conference and can reserve your room at the conference hotel for
the great rate of just $119/day.

Also, be sure to sign up for the conference listserv so that you are the
first to hear about conference plans and can share your thoughts,
questions and answers. You can do this by signing up for "Salt Lake
City 2007" at www.lyris.jewishgen.org/listmanager/.

See you in SLC this Summer!
Hal Bookbinder and Mike Brenner, Conference Co-Chairs


IAJGS Conference -- Bad Arolsen, "Finding our Fathers", DNA and more #warsaw #poland

information@slc2007.org <information@...>
 

The 27th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is
planning a wide range of programs to complement the outstanding
research opportunities at the Family History Library.

The Conference's opening session, on July 15th, will feature Paul A.
Shapiro, director of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He will discuss the history of
efforts to open the International Tracing Services' Archives at Bad
Arolsen to researchers, the Archive's holdings, digitization of its
records and the current state of access. These archives contain
millions of documents on Holocaust victims which have been
generally inaccessible to researchers.

The Banquet, on July 19th, will feature Dan Rottenberg, speaking on
his book, "Finding Our Fathers," on the 30th anniversary of its
publication. When Finding Our Fathers: A Guidebook to Jewish
Genealogy appeared in 1977, following the Roots series and Kunta
Kinte, a mass of people realized that they could also trace their
families and the modern Jewish genealogy movement was launched.

If you are a DNA or genetics junkie then Wednesday, July 18th,
will be your day! There will be a series of genetic-oriented programs
from morning through evening, including Syd Mandelbaum's "Helping
to Find Those Who Were Lost, The DNA Shoah Project," Bennett
Greenspan's "Genetics 2007," Jon Entine's "Abraham's Children:
Race, Identity, & the DNA of 'The Chosen People'" and Gary Frohlich's,
"Our Heritage & Our Health-Genetic Conditions Among the Ashkenazim".
The day will include extensive Q&A sessions and a DNA collection. Still
not enough? There will be yet more on Friday morning with Herbert
Huebscher's "DNA and Classic Genealogy Join to Solve Genealogical Puzzle".
These are only a sampling of the 120+ programs that will be offered during
the conference. While you will find some of your favorites, many of the
presentations will be new.

To learn more about conference programming, research at the Family
History Library, the conference film festival, its unique photographic
exhibit, exciting things to do in Utah and much more, check out the
conference website at www.slc2007.org. You can register for the
conference and can reserve your room at the conference hotel for
the great rate of just $119/day.

Also, be sure to sign up for the conference listserv so that you are the
first to hear about conference plans and can share your thoughts,
questions and answers. You can do this by signing up for "Salt Lake
City 2007" at www.lyris.jewishgen.org/listmanager/.

See you in SLC this Summer!
Hal Bookbinder and Mike Brenner, Conference Co-Chairs


LI-RA-MA database completed #poland

Donna Dinberg <blacknus@...>
 

Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the completion of
the database of the Likacheff-Ragosine-Mathers (LI-RA-MA) collection.
Created between 1898 and 1922 by the consular offices of the Tsarist
Russian Empire in Canada, the approximately 11,400 files pertain to
Jewish, Ukrainian and Finnish immigrants who came to Canada >from many
locations within the Russian Empire. The files include passport
applications, identity papers and questionnaires containing general
information. Since the initial release of the database in October
2006, 35,000 digitized images have been added, bringing the total
number of images to 55,000.

The LI-RA-MA collection is located at:
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/li-ra-ma/index-e.html

Click the "Search" link on the left to search the database.

The LI-RA-MA database is one of several launched recently as part of
LAC's "Moving Here, Staying Here" project. You are invited to visit
the site at: http://www.collectionscanada.ca/immigrants.

The contributions of many LAC staff were instrumental in the success of
this project, and their efforts are much appreciated. For more
information, please contact the Project Manager, Ang=E8le Alain, at
webservices@...


---
Posted on behalf of Library and Archives Canada by:

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
blacknus@...


Family of OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN #poland

Carolyn Lea <clea@...>
 

Two years ago when I began researching my father's family I located a cousin
(our greatgrandfather Levisons were brothers and married Rothschild sisters)
who told me that he remembers being told that we were cousins to the
lyricist Oscar Hammerstein - that Minnie Rothschild was his mother. I
checked google and dismissed the information as incorrect. However, when I
worked with the LDS film of Jewish records >from Elbing (Elblag) I
discovered that my gg-grandfather, Moses Lewisohn, was married to Minna
Hammerstein. The fact that my cousin knew the name Minnie makes me lend a
little more credence to his story. Moses was born in Elbing in 1822 and my
g-grandfather was born in 1851 so I assume that Minna was born in the 1820s.
I do not believe Minna was born in Elbing as I did not find Hammerstein
records there. A marriage record for Moses and Minna was not on the film,
nor was the birth of the first child, my g-grandfather. I am guessing that
they may have married in Minna's home town and had a child there.

My questions are: Oscar Hammerstein I was born in Stettin in 1847 to Abraham
and Berthe. It appears that Elblag and Szczecin (Stettin) are about 230
miles apart. I believe the most likely connection would be one to Abraham
(sister?) based on what I believe to be Minna's age. Is it likely that a
marriage would have occurred between families living that far apart?

I have looked at the LDS films listed for Stettin (on JRI POLAND) and there
is not a film that would include birth records for the period that would
include Minna and Abraham. Is anyone familiar with the films? Are there any
that might be helpful? Would marriage records include parents names as they
do in Elbing?

Any research suggestions are appreciated. If there is a connection it may be
possible that my Lewisohns began in Stettin as >from what I understand Elbing
did not have a Jewish population until the early 1800s.

Carolyn Lea
NW Ohio
clea@...
ID# 152314

Researching: SCHWARZBAUM/SCHWARTZBAUM > Posen, Prussia >New York,
Savannah, Georgia and California ROTHSCHILD/ROTHCHILD> Zierenberg, Hessen
Kassel, & Hamburg? Prussia> Darien and Savannah, Georgia
BASCH>Prussia>Savannah, Georgia LEWISOHN/LEVISON Elbing, West Prussia>
Brunswick and Savannah, Georgia
OPPENHEIM > Savannah, Georgia & South Carolina WEINBERG >Hamburg > Georgia