Date   

Re: Rat-Beil Str. Frankfurt Cemetery Database #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

Larry, after you enter your User Name and Password and click Log In, you will be
taken to the page titled "TABLE: Gravestones." Type the name you want in the
search box and click "Search." I tried it out with the name "oppenheimer" as a
test and got 226 records. At a glance, most of the records for Oppenheimer have
a thumbnail photo, but some either say "Photo Coming Soon" or show a red X,
indicating a broken link. For other names, I saw a number of records showing
"Photo Coming Soon" or the red X.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY


I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database, but I couldn't figure out how to find the images I needed,
and the librarians were not of much help. >from the on-line database at
http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID numbers. How do I
get >from there to the correct images?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer

Larry Oppenheimer <larry.oppenheimer@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rat-Beil Str. Frankfurt Cemetery Database #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

Larry, after you enter your User Name and Password and click Log In, you will be
taken to the page titled "TABLE: Gravestones." Type the name you want in the
search box and click "Search." I tried it out with the name "oppenheimer" as a
test and got 226 records. At a glance, most of the records for Oppenheimer have
a thumbnail photo, but some either say "Photo Coming Soon" or show a red X,
indicating a broken link. For other names, I saw a number of records showing
"Photo Coming Soon" or the red X.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY


I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database, but I couldn't figure out how to find the images I needed,
and the librarians were not of much help. >from the on-line database at
http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID numbers. How do I
get >from there to the correct images?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer

Larry Oppenheimer <larry.oppenheimer@...>


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Researcher #ukraine

R. KIM BLEIWEISS <rkbleiweiss@...>
 

My family was >from Kiyev - I know, big place. Many immigrated to US at the
turn of the last century, but we know NOTHING of those that stayed behind or
past generations.

Can any of you recommend a trustworthy researcher/genealogist either here or
abroad that could help us kick start our genealogical research? Anyone that
any of you have had any good experience with?

Thanks, Kim

R. Kim Bleiweiss
rkbleiweiss@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately. Always sign posts with your location.


Researcher #ukraine

R. KIM BLEIWEISS <rkbleiweiss@...>
 

My family was >from Kiyev - I know, big place. Many immigrated to US at the
turn of the last century, but we know NOTHING of those that stayed behind or
past generations.

Can any of you recommend a trustworthy researcher/genealogist either here or
abroad that could help us kick start our genealogical research? Anyone that
any of you have had any good experience with?

Thanks, Kim

R. Kim Bleiweiss
rkbleiweiss@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately. Always sign posts with your location.


Huyton Internment camp WWII #unitedkingdom

Kirsten Gradel <kirsten.gradel@...>
 

My father had a cousin, Danish Rita Kernn-Larsen(1904-1998) who
became a well known surrealistic artist.

She studied in France where she met her later husband, the Austrian
Isak Gr=FCnberg(Tarnopol 1897-France 1953) art-dealer, journalist and translator. They came to UK in 1938 where they married in 1940 and had a daughter either in 1940 or 1944. 1946 they returned to France.

I have not been able to find neither their marriage nor the daughter birth in the Findmypast(formerly 1837online) files.

The couple was classified as Enemy Aliens in 1940, and he at least
was in Huyton internment camp near Liverpool for a while. On the
MovingHere web site I found a card for her headed: Female Enemy Alien - Exemption >from internment - non-refugee. Her case seems to have
been reclassified and/or gone before a tribunal in 1942, when she
lived in Willow Road, Hampstead ?

But I cannot find anything about Isak in UK files, despite the fact
that his was a well known name due to his French-to-German
translation of Celine's <Reise ans Ende der Nacht> which caused
quite an uproar: When the second edition came out the censorship in
Germany had seriously tampered with the translation and omitted the
translator's very Jewish name altogether. I have been into the
National Archives and Google finds a lot about him but nothing >from
the English 1938-46 period.

Question A: Is it possible the marriage and birth records are located in another index if both events
took place in an Alien Enemy Internment camp?

Question B: Where may I possibly find UK information about Isak? Are
there lists of Huyton inmates 1940-41 anywhere?

Thanks,

Kirsten Gradel,
Nyborg, Denmark


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Huyton Internment camp WWII #unitedkingdom

Kirsten Gradel <kirsten.gradel@...>
 

My father had a cousin, Danish Rita Kernn-Larsen(1904-1998) who
became a well known surrealistic artist.

She studied in France where she met her later husband, the Austrian
Isak Gr=FCnberg(Tarnopol 1897-France 1953) art-dealer, journalist and translator. They came to UK in 1938 where they married in 1940 and had a daughter either in 1940 or 1944. 1946 they returned to France.

I have not been able to find neither their marriage nor the daughter birth in the Findmypast(formerly 1837online) files.

The couple was classified as Enemy Aliens in 1940, and he at least
was in Huyton internment camp near Liverpool for a while. On the
MovingHere web site I found a card for her headed: Female Enemy Alien - Exemption >from internment - non-refugee. Her case seems to have
been reclassified and/or gone before a tribunal in 1942, when she
lived in Willow Road, Hampstead ?

But I cannot find anything about Isak in UK files, despite the fact
that his was a well known name due to his French-to-German
translation of Celine's <Reise ans Ende der Nacht> which caused
quite an uproar: When the second edition came out the censorship in
Germany had seriously tampered with the translation and omitted the
translator's very Jewish name altogether. I have been into the
National Archives and Google finds a lot about him but nothing >from
the English 1938-46 period.

Question A: Is it possible the marriage and birth records are located in another index if both events
took place in an Alien Enemy Internment camp?

Question B: Where may I possibly find UK information about Isak? Are
there lists of Huyton inmates 1940-41 anywhere?

Thanks,

Kirsten Gradel,
Nyborg, Denmark


Book recommendation #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Now available on JewishGen Mall
http://www.jewishgenmall.org/
*******************************

"Norman S. Poser:
"Escape. A Jewish Scandinavian family in the Second World War".
Sareve Press, New York. 2006. 304 pages. Illustrated.
ISBN: 0-9785910-0-3

On April 9, 1940, Germany invaded Norway and Denmark. By the end of WWII
more than a third of the Norwegian Jews would be dead at the hand of the Nazis
and their collaborators, but most of the Danish Jews were saved by the Danish
People. This is the story of a Jewish-Scandinavian family who, all but one,
escaped the death camps. It is also a story of the Jews in Scandinavia from
medieval times through the upheavals of the 20th Century, told in the context
of the national movements, attitudes, and policies that are inseparable from
both collective and individual history.

The Salomons were descended >from two Jewish Danish-born brothers who
established a shoe factory in Norway in the 19th Century. At the time of the
invasion most members were still living in Norway or Denmark. Their routes of
escape >from their Nazi-occupied homelands weave a mixed pattern of strategies,
reactions, good and bad luck, and debts to the kindness of strangers that
mirrors on an intimate scale the experience of Holocaust survivors in
Scandinavia.

Johanna, the widowed matriarch of the family, refused to flee Norway and was
imprisoned there, stubbornly clinging to Norwegian citizenship. Because of an
equal determined diplomat, who interceded for her, she escaped deportation to
Auschwitz, by fleeing to Denmark - only to have to flee once more in October
1943 >from Denmark to Sweden. One of Johanna's sons survived the occupation in
a mental asylum. Two sons and a cousin were able to reach Sweden, a daughter
fled alone with her little girl along a circuitous path via Sweden, Moscow and
Tokyo that ended in New York City.

But the history unfolded here is more than a tale of physical escape.
It reverberates through multiple levels with the many meanings of what
is lost and what is gained when lives are overturned. For one brother,
escape >from Norway meant a chance, at last, to do work he seemed meant
to do. Escape for one sister freed her >from the direct control of a
domineering mother. In the strangest and saddest saga, the only sister
not endangered my the Nazis escaped her own life by leaping >from an
oceanliner window.

Escape is a family story, a history of Jews in Scandinavia and much,
much more.

It is an exciting story, easily read (and hard to put down before the
last page) and free form sentimentality, but it is also an academic
work with bibliography, notes and index.

An extraordinary book that I warmly recommend.

P.S. I have no economic interest in the book

Best regards

Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@...


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Book recommendation #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Now available on JewishGen Mall
http://www.jewishgenmall.org/
*******************************

"Norman S. Poser:
"Escape. A Jewish Scandinavian family in the Second World War".
Sareve Press, New York. 2006. 304 pages. Illustrated.
ISBN: 0-9785910-0-3

On April 9, 1940, Germany invaded Norway and Denmark. By the end of WWII
more than a third of the Norwegian Jews would be dead at the hand of the Nazis
and their collaborators, but most of the Danish Jews were saved by the Danish
People. This is the story of a Jewish-Scandinavian family who, all but one,
escaped the death camps. It is also a story of the Jews in Scandinavia from
medieval times through the upheavals of the 20th Century, told in the context
of the national movements, attitudes, and policies that are inseparable from
both collective and individual history.

The Salomons were descended >from two Jewish Danish-born brothers who
established a shoe factory in Norway in the 19th Century. At the time of the
invasion most members were still living in Norway or Denmark. Their routes of
escape >from their Nazi-occupied homelands weave a mixed pattern of strategies,
reactions, good and bad luck, and debts to the kindness of strangers that
mirrors on an intimate scale the experience of Holocaust survivors in
Scandinavia.

Johanna, the widowed matriarch of the family, refused to flee Norway and was
imprisoned there, stubbornly clinging to Norwegian citizenship. Because of an
equal determined diplomat, who interceded for her, she escaped deportation to
Auschwitz, by fleeing to Denmark - only to have to flee once more in October
1943 >from Denmark to Sweden. One of Johanna's sons survived the occupation in
a mental asylum. Two sons and a cousin were able to reach Sweden, a daughter
fled alone with her little girl along a circuitous path via Sweden, Moscow and
Tokyo that ended in New York City.

But the history unfolded here is more than a tale of physical escape.
It reverberates through multiple levels with the many meanings of what
is lost and what is gained when lives are overturned. For one brother,
escape >from Norway meant a chance, at last, to do work he seemed meant
to do. Escape for one sister freed her >from the direct control of a
domineering mother. In the strangest and saddest saga, the only sister
not endangered my the Nazis escaped her own life by leaping >from an
oceanliner window.

Escape is a family story, a history of Jews in Scandinavia and much,
much more.

It is an exciting story, easily read (and hard to put down before the
last page) and free form sentimentality, but it is also an academic
work with bibliography, notes and index.

An extraordinary book that I warmly recommend.

P.S. I have no economic interest in the book

Best regards

Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@...


Riga Ghetto question #latvia

George Mason <gmason3815@...>
 

Does anyone happen to know the house number of the building in Riga Ghetto
on Ludzas iela where the elderly and infirm were living? I believe Professor
Simon Dubnow also lived there. Is the building still standing?
Thank You,
George Mason
USA
Researching MOZESON and NATHANSON in Riga


Latvia SIG #Latvia Riga Ghetto question #latvia

George Mason <gmason3815@...>
 

Does anyone happen to know the house number of the building in Riga Ghetto
on Ludzas iela where the elderly and infirm were living? I believe Professor
Simon Dubnow also lived there. Is the building still standing?
Thank You,
George Mason
USA
Researching MOZESON and NATHANSON in Riga


name origins #latvia

christine usdin <christineusd@...>
 

Dear all,
My great grand father's given name was Beines,also spelled Benis or Benes.
I never meet with this first name in the jewishgen,yad vashem and so on.
What are the origins of this name?
Is it a yiddish given name?
What is the equivalent hebrew name?

Sincerely .
Christine Usdin, France
christineusd@...








christine usdin, christineusd@...
18-11-2006


Latvia SIG #Latvia name origins #latvia

christine usdin <christineusd@...>
 

Dear all,
My great grand father's given name was Beines,also spelled Benis or Benes.
I never meet with this first name in the jewishgen,yad vashem and so on.
What are the origins of this name?
Is it a yiddish given name?
What is the equivalent hebrew name?

Sincerely .
Christine Usdin, France
christineusd@...








christine usdin, christineusd@...
18-11-2006


Look-up help needed in JC film #unitedkingdom

Kirsten Gradel <kirsten.gradel@...>
 

I would be very grateful if someone who is going to a library with
the JC films would do a look-up for me.

Searching the online JC I find in May 1 1908, (page 24/25) an entry
with the following words:

...Reginald Mark Abrahams, of 232 Willesden Lane, the nephew.
Everything he may die possessed of has to ... postcards. Quite
recently we happened to be looking through a Hagadah(made in
Germany) in which Abrahams....
Reginald Mark Abrahams is a relative I have found it hard to trace. I
have his B certificate >from 1880 and recently found his marriage in
1915(he was a stockbroker then) but that is all. The family know even
less.

So I am very curious what above JC entry is about. Due to the address
I am sure he is the right Reginald.

Thanks in advance,

Kirsten Gradel,
Nyborg, Denmark


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Look-up help needed in JC film #unitedkingdom

Kirsten Gradel <kirsten.gradel@...>
 

I would be very grateful if someone who is going to a library with
the JC films would do a look-up for me.

Searching the online JC I find in May 1 1908, (page 24/25) an entry
with the following words:

...Reginald Mark Abrahams, of 232 Willesden Lane, the nephew.
Everything he may die possessed of has to ... postcards. Quite
recently we happened to be looking through a Hagadah(made in
Germany) in which Abrahams....
Reginald Mark Abrahams is a relative I have found it hard to trace. I
have his B certificate >from 1880 and recently found his marriage in
1915(he was a stockbroker then) but that is all. The family know even
less.

So I am very curious what above JC entry is about. Due to the address
I am sure he is the right Reginald.

Thanks in advance,

Kirsten Gradel,
Nyborg, Denmark


Syllabus from 2004 IAJGS Conference #general

P. S. Wyant
 

Shalom,

I'm wondering if anyone on the list has a complete copy, in good condition,
of the Syllabus >from the Jul/2004 24th IAJGS Conference in Jerusalem and,
if so, whether he/she would be willing to part with it.

If so, could you contact me off-list and advise the cost? I'm at
mailto:wyants@... .

Thanks ... I look forward to hearing >from you!

Regards,

Peter S. Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Syllabus from 2004 IAJGS Conference #general

P. S. Wyant
 

Shalom,

I'm wondering if anyone on the list has a complete copy, in good condition,
of the Syllabus >from the Jul/2004 24th IAJGS Conference in Jerusalem and,
if so, whether he/she would be willing to part with it.

If so, could you contact me off-list and advise the cost? I'm at
mailto:wyants@... .

Thanks ... I look forward to hearing >from you!

Regards,

Peter S. Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada


Rat-Beil Str. Frankfurt Cemetery Database #general

Larry Oppenheimer
 

I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database, but I couldn't figure out how to find the images I needed,
and the librarians were not of much help. >from the on-line database at
http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID numbers. How do I
get >from there to the correct images?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer

Larry Oppenheimer <larry.oppenheimer@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rat-Beil Str. Frankfurt Cemetery Database #general

Larry Oppenheimer
 

I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database, but I couldn't figure out how to find the images I needed,
and the librarians were not of much help. >from the on-line database at
http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID numbers. How do I
get >from there to the correct images?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer

Larry Oppenheimer <larry.oppenheimer@...>


puzzling results of GUGENHEIM research #germany

Dottie Miller
 

For some time, I have been pursuing my GUG(G)ENHEIM(ER) ancestors. My
oldest known ancestor was Marx GUGENHEIMER lived in Ihringen,
Baden-Wurttemberg. I have hired a respected, experienced genealogist to
search for the next earlier generation. He believes that he has now
found my ancestors in some documents. What the researcher found is
puzzling, and I invite your interpretations. He has sent me the name of
the early ancestor, I., and his location, T, as initials until I pay his
bill. I want to be sure that his findings make sense first.

The researcher founds a 1733 entry re: Marx and a brother M, a 1736
entry re: M, another 1736 entry re: I and son S, another entry re: M, a
1737 entry re: son S and father I, another in 1738, two entries in 1739
re: I and son M, last entry re: I in 1742, a 1738 entry re: Marx >from T,
a 1739 entry re: Marx >from Ihringen, a 1739 entry in which Jacob GEISMAR
(father-in-law of Marx) unsuccessfully petitioned for protection in
Ihringen of son-in-law Samuel, a 1740 petition for same that was
accepted, and a 1744 entry in which Jacob GEISMAR petitions on behalf of
another son-in-law. This petition is forever rejected because Jacob
already had a daughter and son-in-law Marx GUGGENHEIMER under
protection. There are no entries re: a Samuel in Ihringen but there are
annual Ihringen protection tax records for Marx and later, another
GUGENHEIM, later Marx's son Jacob and widow Scheinle. In other words,
Marx was recorded as living in Ihringen but not Samuel. Samuel and Marx
never showed up together in earlier records of T, earlier hometown of M,
Marx and Samuel.

The researcher theorizes that Samuel GUGENHEMB, for whom his
father-in-law petitioned for protection in Ihringen, is a phantom and
ought to be Marx. However, the error is hard to explain as he certainly
knew the name of his own son-in-law. The researcher's assumption is
supported by entries in trespassing registers, a Marx GUGENHEIMB >from T
in 1738 and a Marx GUGENHEIMB >from Ihringen in 1739. Again, there
couldn't be 2 sons-in-laws of one man living as protected Jews in the
same town. There is no record of Samuel dying and Marx marrying his
widow and assuming Samuel's protection. There is no record of Marx being
granted protection in Ihringen yet he is cited in 1744 as a protected
Jew of Ihringen.

What other conclusion could there be than Samuel and Marx were one and
the same person?

Dottie J. Miller San Antonio, TX USA <dottiem@...>


German SIG #Germany puzzling results of GUGENHEIM research #germany

Dottie Miller
 

For some time, I have been pursuing my GUG(G)ENHEIM(ER) ancestors. My
oldest known ancestor was Marx GUGENHEIMER lived in Ihringen,
Baden-Wurttemberg. I have hired a respected, experienced genealogist to
search for the next earlier generation. He believes that he has now
found my ancestors in some documents. What the researcher found is
puzzling, and I invite your interpretations. He has sent me the name of
the early ancestor, I., and his location, T, as initials until I pay his
bill. I want to be sure that his findings make sense first.

The researcher founds a 1733 entry re: Marx and a brother M, a 1736
entry re: M, another 1736 entry re: I and son S, another entry re: M, a
1737 entry re: son S and father I, another in 1738, two entries in 1739
re: I and son M, last entry re: I in 1742, a 1738 entry re: Marx >from T,
a 1739 entry re: Marx >from Ihringen, a 1739 entry in which Jacob GEISMAR
(father-in-law of Marx) unsuccessfully petitioned for protection in
Ihringen of son-in-law Samuel, a 1740 petition for same that was
accepted, and a 1744 entry in which Jacob GEISMAR petitions on behalf of
another son-in-law. This petition is forever rejected because Jacob
already had a daughter and son-in-law Marx GUGGENHEIMER under
protection. There are no entries re: a Samuel in Ihringen but there are
annual Ihringen protection tax records for Marx and later, another
GUGENHEIM, later Marx's son Jacob and widow Scheinle. In other words,
Marx was recorded as living in Ihringen but not Samuel. Samuel and Marx
never showed up together in earlier records of T, earlier hometown of M,
Marx and Samuel.

The researcher theorizes that Samuel GUGENHEMB, for whom his
father-in-law petitioned for protection in Ihringen, is a phantom and
ought to be Marx. However, the error is hard to explain as he certainly
knew the name of his own son-in-law. The researcher's assumption is
supported by entries in trespassing registers, a Marx GUGENHEIMB >from T
in 1738 and a Marx GUGENHEIMB >from Ihringen in 1739. Again, there
couldn't be 2 sons-in-laws of one man living as protected Jews in the
same town. There is no record of Samuel dying and Marx marrying his
widow and assuming Samuel's protection. There is no record of Marx being
granted protection in Ihringen yet he is cited in 1744 as a protected
Jew of Ihringen.

What other conclusion could there be than Samuel and Marx were one and
the same person?

Dottie J. Miller San Antonio, TX USA <dottiem@...>