Date   

Alsedziai #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

There is an online translation of the Pinkas HaKehillot Lita chapter
on Alsedziai at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00144.html as well as
some photos of the town recently taken by Gilda Kurtzman.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Re: A Mason-Dixon type line for Litvaks and Galitizianers #lithuania

Ted <tmargulis@...>
 

The site you were referring to about the Mason-Dixon line for Litvaks and
Galitizianers is:

http://www.jewishsf.com/content/2-0-/module/displaystory/story_id/12012/format/html/displaystory.html

Just click on the link above or copy it into your Address line of your
browser. Great stuff!

Warm Regards,
Ted Margulis
Palm Desert, CA
tmargulis@dc.rr.com
http://jewishwebindex.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Alsedziai #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

There is an online translation of the Pinkas HaKehillot Lita chapter
on Alsedziai at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00144.html as well as
some photos of the town recently taken by Gilda Kurtzman.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: A Mason-Dixon type line for Litvaks and Galitizianers #lithuania

Ted <tmargulis@...>
 

The site you were referring to about the Mason-Dixon line for Litvaks and
Galitizianers is:

http://www.jewishsf.com/content/2-0-/module/displaystory/story_id/12012/format/html/displaystory.html

Just click on the link above or copy it into your Address line of your
browser. Great stuff!

Warm Regards,
Ted Margulis
Palm Desert, CA
tmargulis@dc.rr.com
http://jewishwebindex.com


Cholent #lithuania

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

As per the moderator's request, I'm sharing my mother's cholent recipe.
Mom's descended >from two Litvische parents, father >from Vasilishki, mother
American born, with maternal grandparents >from Vilna Gubernia (shtetlach
unknown).

3-4 lbs. beef (brisket, flanken, etc.)
1 lb. dried lima beans
3 large onions, sliced
1/4 cup chicken fat
salt, pepper & paprika
1 small clove garlic
1/2 lb. barley
2 T. flour
boiling water to cover

Soak beans overnight, drain. Using heavy pot, brown onions in fat, remove.
Rub meat generously with salt, pepper, paprika & garlic. Brown well in hot
fat. Add all ingredients; sprinkle lightly with flour. Add boiling water to
cover. Cover tightly & bring to a boil. Taste, adjust salt, pepper. To
finish cooking, place covered pot in 250 degree oven overnight & until noon
next day or cook in 350 degree oven for 3-4 hours. Serves 10-12.

My Yeshiva trained sons get annoyed with my cholent, because it is too
thick, and has no potatoes or eggs. Sometimes I compromise, adding water,
eggs and potatoes, but I have to leave the table when they eat the eggs.

My late paternal great uncle, who hailed >from Boguslav, Ukraine, at the end
of his years, pined for cholent, though he had cancer of the stomach, and
this couldn't have been easy for him to digest. My mother made this cholent
for him, and he couldn't thank her enough. Now, I wonder if it was
appreciated as much as she thought. Who knows what might have gone into his
mother's Ukrainian cholent?

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Cholent #lithuania

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

As per the moderator's request, I'm sharing my mother's cholent recipe.
Mom's descended >from two Litvische parents, father >from Vasilishki, mother
American born, with maternal grandparents >from Vilna Gubernia (shtetlach
unknown).

3-4 lbs. beef (brisket, flanken, etc.)
1 lb. dried lima beans
3 large onions, sliced
1/4 cup chicken fat
salt, pepper & paprika
1 small clove garlic
1/2 lb. barley
2 T. flour
boiling water to cover

Soak beans overnight, drain. Using heavy pot, brown onions in fat, remove.
Rub meat generously with salt, pepper, paprika & garlic. Brown well in hot
fat. Add all ingredients; sprinkle lightly with flour. Add boiling water to
cover. Cover tightly & bring to a boil. Taste, adjust salt, pepper. To
finish cooking, place covered pot in 250 degree oven overnight & until noon
next day or cook in 350 degree oven for 3-4 hours. Serves 10-12.

My Yeshiva trained sons get annoyed with my cholent, because it is too
thick, and has no potatoes or eggs. Sometimes I compromise, adding water,
eggs and potatoes, but I have to leave the table when they eat the eggs.

My late paternal great uncle, who hailed >from Boguslav, Ukraine, at the end
of his years, pined for cholent, though he had cancer of the stomach, and
this couldn't have been easy for him to digest. My mother made this cholent
for him, and he couldn't thank her enough. Now, I wonder if it was
appreciated as much as she thought. Who knows what might have gone into his
mother's Ukrainian cholent?

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


Latkes & Applesauce #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

I have been reading the thread regarding latkes and other traditional foods.
My family was a mixture of Litvak and Galitzeaners, so the differences
sometime became blurred. In general, my Litvak family did not sweeten
gefilte fish, but they did put sugar cubes in their mouths while drinking
hot tea >from a glass.

For Chanukah and all holidays, my American-born grandmother of Litvak
heritage, made delicious applesauce. It was one of the things that she could
make in advance of the holidays in her tiny kitchen. I remember going to her
house and checking the refrigerator to make sure that the applesauce was
there. When she passed away, I was given many of her cooking implements, but
the one that I treasure is her Foley food mill - an implement that is almost
totally absent (but still available) in today's kitchens. Here is a recipe
for applesauce that I have adapted >from a modern one to reflect the
tradition that I follow to this day. for Chanukah and all holidays.
Store-bought applesauce is cheaper and easier, but this applesauce is so
delicious and special. It is a great project to work on with children or
grandchildren. Enjoy!

GRANDMA HILDA's APPLESAUCE

4 pounds apples, quartered, but not peeled
1 lemon, quartered (OPTIONAL)
2 cinnamon sticks (OPTIONAL)
1/2 cup water (apple juice, or cider may be used for sweetness)

Place apples in a large pot. Add lemon and cinnamon sticks, if desired. Add
water ( or apple juice or cider). Cover, bring to a boil, and them simmer
over low heat, stirring occasionally to turn the apples and making sure they
do not stick. You may want to add some liquid, if needed. Cook about 20
minutes, or until the apples are very soft. (Remove cinnamon sticks.) Using
a ladle, put the hot cooked apples through a food mill and adjust seasoning
by adding honey, brown sugar, or maple syrup to taste.

Grandma Hilda made the applesauce year 'round, but always for the holidays.
She used recycled glass quart jars and she put a piece of waxed paper under
the lid. Applesauce may be made up to two weeks in advance and stored in the
refrigerator in a glass jar that is tightly sealed. I bought some (quart and
half-gallon) jars with glass lids and rubber rings for a tight seal. I wash
the jar thoroughly immediately before filling it with the hot applesauce
straight >from the food mill.

For special holidays when Italian prune plums were in season, Grandma used
to add about 6 pitted prune plums (with skin) to the apples before cooking.
The plums add a delightful pink color to the finished applesauce. As a
variation, I have added whole or crushed unsweetened frozen strawberries to
the mixture about 5 minutes before putting the mixture though the food mill.

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD
Researching:
Researching:
KATZ, DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM in Shuravno & Rozniatow, Galicia.
HANTMAN, GANTMAN and SINGER in Minsk gubernia.
SHOMER, SOMMERS, SOHMER & KULPE in Lithuania.


JRI Poland #Poland Latkes & Applesauce #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

I have been reading the thread regarding latkes and other traditional foods.
My family was a mixture of Litvak and Galitzeaners, so the differences
sometime became blurred. In general, my Litvak family did not sweeten
gefilte fish, but they did put sugar cubes in their mouths while drinking
hot tea >from a glass.

For Chanukah and all holidays, my American-born grandmother of Litvak
heritage, made delicious applesauce. It was one of the things that she could
make in advance of the holidays in her tiny kitchen. I remember going to her
house and checking the refrigerator to make sure that the applesauce was
there. When she passed away, I was given many of her cooking implements, but
the one that I treasure is her Foley food mill - an implement that is almost
totally absent (but still available) in today's kitchens. Here is a recipe
for applesauce that I have adapted >from a modern one to reflect the
tradition that I follow to this day. for Chanukah and all holidays.
Store-bought applesauce is cheaper and easier, but this applesauce is so
delicious and special. It is a great project to work on with children or
grandchildren. Enjoy!

GRANDMA HILDA's APPLESAUCE

4 pounds apples, quartered, but not peeled
1 lemon, quartered (OPTIONAL)
2 cinnamon sticks (OPTIONAL)
1/2 cup water (apple juice, or cider may be used for sweetness)

Place apples in a large pot. Add lemon and cinnamon sticks, if desired. Add
water ( or apple juice or cider). Cover, bring to a boil, and them simmer
over low heat, stirring occasionally to turn the apples and making sure they
do not stick. You may want to add some liquid, if needed. Cook about 20
minutes, or until the apples are very soft. (Remove cinnamon sticks.) Using
a ladle, put the hot cooked apples through a food mill and adjust seasoning
by adding honey, brown sugar, or maple syrup to taste.

Grandma Hilda made the applesauce year 'round, but always for the holidays.
She used recycled glass quart jars and she put a piece of waxed paper under
the lid. Applesauce may be made up to two weeks in advance and stored in the
refrigerator in a glass jar that is tightly sealed. I bought some (quart and
half-gallon) jars with glass lids and rubber rings for a tight seal. I wash
the jar thoroughly immediately before filling it with the hot applesauce
straight >from the food mill.

For special holidays when Italian prune plums were in season, Grandma used
to add about 6 pitted prune plums (with skin) to the apples before cooking.
The plums add a delightful pink color to the finished applesauce. As a
variation, I have added whole or crushed unsweetened frozen strawberries to
the mixture about 5 minutes before putting the mixture though the food mill.

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD
Researching:
Researching:
KATZ, DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM in Shuravno & Rozniatow, Galicia.
HANTMAN, GANTMAN and SINGER in Minsk gubernia.
SHOMER, SOMMERS, SOHMER & KULPE in Lithuania.


Latkes #poland

Devin and Julia Van Zandt (Home) <sonar230@...>
 

OK: I have to chime in on this one. On my mother's maternal side, the
family of my great grandmother (Carrie WARSZAWSKY / MARKS) was >from Warta,
Poland. The family of my great grandfather (Herman FINKELSTEIN) was from
Paltusk, Poland. On her paternal line, the family of my great grandfather
(Julius GLICZINSKY/GOLDSTEIN) was >from Petrovsk, Russia but he died so
young that it's hard to imagine his having much latke influence. My great
grandmother's family (Pauline TUCHLER) was >from Gollub, Westpreussen, now
Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland.

Maybe because there was both Russian and Polish influence we ate latkes
with both sour cream and applesauce. However the family was Reform from
very early on, and strictly not kosher, which might be why the sour cream
was allowable. We *never* ate them with sugar, and growing up we only ate
"savory" gefilte (>from a jar) as opposed to sweet. Now I prefer sweet
(but still >from a jar), so you don't need to grow up with it to like it
best :).

Having said all this I don't know how much of the influence was >from my
mom's parents, and thus their parents, and how much was just because she
didn't much like sweet foods. I wasn't introduced to maple syrup on
pancakes until I was in grade school, and to this day prefer them a little
salty, with butter.

My latke recipe (the very best) is about 1/3 onion to 2/3 potato, lots of
salt and matzoh meal, eggs to bind, fried in veg oil. I used to grate by
hand but as the annual latke party has grown to bigger numbers now use a
food processor. I also used to peel them all, but to my surprise have
discovered you cannot tell the difference if they are peeled, so why
bother?

We eat latkes at least once during Pesach as well as during Chanuka.

Wishing all of you a happy healthy Chanuka!

Julia Van Zandt


JRI Poland #Poland Latkes #poland

Devin and Julia Van Zandt (Home) <sonar230@...>
 

OK: I have to chime in on this one. On my mother's maternal side, the
family of my great grandmother (Carrie WARSZAWSKY / MARKS) was >from Warta,
Poland. The family of my great grandfather (Herman FINKELSTEIN) was from
Paltusk, Poland. On her paternal line, the family of my great grandfather
(Julius GLICZINSKY/GOLDSTEIN) was >from Petrovsk, Russia but he died so
young that it's hard to imagine his having much latke influence. My great
grandmother's family (Pauline TUCHLER) was >from Gollub, Westpreussen, now
Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland.

Maybe because there was both Russian and Polish influence we ate latkes
with both sour cream and applesauce. However the family was Reform from
very early on, and strictly not kosher, which might be why the sour cream
was allowable. We *never* ate them with sugar, and growing up we only ate
"savory" gefilte (>from a jar) as opposed to sweet. Now I prefer sweet
(but still >from a jar), so you don't need to grow up with it to like it
best :).

Having said all this I don't know how much of the influence was >from my
mom's parents, and thus their parents, and how much was just because she
didn't much like sweet foods. I wasn't introduced to maple syrup on
pancakes until I was in grade school, and to this day prefer them a little
salty, with butter.

My latke recipe (the very best) is about 1/3 onion to 2/3 potato, lots of
salt and matzoh meal, eggs to bind, fried in veg oil. I used to grate by
hand but as the annual latke party has grown to bigger numbers now use a
food processor. I also used to peel them all, but to my surprise have
discovered you cannot tell the difference if they are peeled, so why
bother?

We eat latkes at least once during Pesach as well as during Chanuka.

Wishing all of you a happy healthy Chanuka!

Julia Van Zandt


A story on gen and latkes #poland

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

OK,

I cannot resist any longer.
A few years ago I did a story on "we eat what we are,"
with some food traditions as clues to our roots.
Now it is time for a specific gen-and-latkes story.

I've been reading the thread carefully, literally
"eating it up," and think it would be a great story.
I'd like to mention the people who wrote in, include
the family traditions and the places >from which their
parents/grandparents/ancestors originated, and where
the writer lives.

If you would like to be included in this, please write
to me privately and see if we can get this great story
out there.

With best wishes,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net


JRI Poland #Poland A story on gen and latkes #poland

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

OK,

I cannot resist any longer.
A few years ago I did a story on "we eat what we are,"
with some food traditions as clues to our roots.
Now it is time for a specific gen-and-latkes story.

I've been reading the thread carefully, literally
"eating it up," and think it would be a great story.
I'd like to mention the people who wrote in, include
the family traditions and the places >from which their
parents/grandparents/ancestors originated, and where
the writer lives.

If you would like to be included in this, please write
to me privately and see if we can get this great story
out there.

With best wishes,

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net


Re: Latkes #poland

MEL OSHINS
 

In a message dated 12/14/2005 11:25:50 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
AmyLynne Milich writes:

<< We never use a food processor. We hand grate them on
the ribeisen and add lots of fresh onions, black pepper, matzoh meal and
eggs. I have never tasted them any better. >>


Mama's family was >from Czernowitz. Prior to WWI it was part of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire. Following WWI it became part of Romania and
was called Romanian Cernauti. After WWII it was annexed by the Soviet
Union and was called in Russian, Czernowitzki Gorod (town). This part
of Europe had belonged at different times to Southern Poland and
Southern Ukraine. (info >from Jewishgen). My father's family was >from
Suwalki near the border of Lithuania.

I don't know whose Latkes we had but it was exactly like you say, my
Mother never used a food processor. she hand grated them on the
ribeisen and add lots of fresh onions, black pepper, matzoh meal and
eggs. Only I added sugar and I have never tasted them any better.

Both my parents were born in Manhattan's East Side.

Mel Oshins formerly of The Bronx, NY
La Quinta, CA


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Latkes #poland

MEL OSHINS
 

In a message dated 12/14/2005 11:25:50 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
AmyLynne Milich writes:

<< We never use a food processor. We hand grate them on
the ribeisen and add lots of fresh onions, black pepper, matzoh meal and
eggs. I have never tasted them any better. >>


Mama's family was >from Czernowitz. Prior to WWI it was part of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire. Following WWI it became part of Romania and
was called Romanian Cernauti. After WWII it was annexed by the Soviet
Union and was called in Russian, Czernowitzki Gorod (town). This part
of Europe had belonged at different times to Southern Poland and
Southern Ukraine. (info >from Jewishgen). My father's family was >from
Suwalki near the border of Lithuania.

I don't know whose Latkes we had but it was exactly like you say, my
Mother never used a food processor. she hand grated them on the
ribeisen and add lots of fresh onions, black pepper, matzoh meal and
eggs. Only I added sugar and I have never tasted them any better.

Both my parents were born in Manhattan's East Side.

Mel Oshins formerly of The Bronx, NY
La Quinta, CA


*re: List of Terezin Survivors #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Vivian and all,

As far as I know, this is the same list which based the Beit Terezin database. I received transcript of my mother's and mine stay in that camp, which contain the following data:

Register number
Family Name
First name
Maiden name
Birth date
Country of birth
City of birth
Last address
Deceased or Survived
Date of death
Place of death
Coffin number
Coroner certificate
If survived, where
Other camps where interned
Transport number TO Terezin
Date of arrival
Origin of transport - country and city
Transport number >from Terezin
Date of departure
Destination of transport - country and city

Of course not all these data are available for the persons in this database, but Beit Terezin informs all those which are.

Good luck
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 13.12.2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Subject: List of Terezin Survivors
From: vkahn@kmort.com
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2005 18:55:22 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

Can anyone tell me what information is provided in the LIST OF JEWISH
SURVIVORS FOUND IN THERESIENSTADT ON 10.5.1945 that is one of the
sources included in JewishGen's Holocaust Database? This list was
assembled by the Executive Committee of "Agudat Israel", Jerusalem, and
by the Czechoslovakian Settlers' Association.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary *re: List of Terezin Survivors #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Vivian and all,

As far as I know, this is the same list which based the Beit Terezin database. I received transcript of my mother's and mine stay in that camp, which contain the following data:

Register number
Family Name
First name
Maiden name
Birth date
Country of birth
City of birth
Last address
Deceased or Survived
Date of death
Place of death
Coffin number
Coroner certificate
If survived, where
Other camps where interned
Transport number TO Terezin
Date of arrival
Origin of transport - country and city
Transport number >from Terezin
Date of departure
Destination of transport - country and city

Of course not all these data are available for the persons in this database, but Beit Terezin informs all those which are.

Good luck
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 13.12.2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Subject: List of Terezin Survivors
From: vkahn@kmort.com
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2005 18:55:22 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

Can anyone tell me what information is provided in the LIST OF JEWISH
SURVIVORS FOUND IN THERESIENSTADT ON 10.5.1945 that is one of the
sources included in JewishGen's Holocaust Database? This list was
assembled by the Executive Committee of "Agudat Israel", Jerusalem, and
by the Czechoslovakian Settlers' Association.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Hebrew name Shmule(k) Zanville? from Lodz #germany

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 13:16:23 UTC, janbousse@skynet.be (Jan BOUSSE) opined:

Hello,

I am researching a family TENCER in Lodz, Poland. One son in the States
remembers that his father, called Sigmund in the States, had as Hebrew name
Shmule(k) Zanville. He didn't seem too sure, so I am wondering if his memory
is correct. Shmulek or Szmulek is used by another descendant, I believe that
is a common name. But Zanville? Could he have mis-read or misunderstood
Samuel?
No, he did not misunderstand.

Consider that in German, "Z" is read like English "S", so we might
write the name phonetically as "Sanvil". What your informant heard as
an "N" is actually a nasalized "A" which makes the "N"
indistinguishable >from "M"; the nasalization is a local habit of
speech, so ignore it and write "M", giving you "Samvil". Most European
languages pronounce "W" as English "V", yielding "Samwil", which is
close enough to "Samwel" > "Samuel".

In my own tree there are two men called "Zawel". In their case, the
nasalization wasn't written as "N", because Polish has a special
character for the nasalized "A". It was perceived by your informant as
"N" because writing wasn't involved.

MODERATOR NOTE: The Double name Shmuel Zanvil has been discussed here before.
Please check the Discussion Group Archives at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archpop
As shown above, it isn't really a double name at all, but a single
name with two pronunciations.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above
-- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew name Shmule(k) Zanville? from Lodz #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 13:16:23 UTC, janbousse@skynet.be (Jan BOUSSE) opined:

Hello,

I am researching a family TENCER in Lodz, Poland. One son in the States
remembers that his father, called Sigmund in the States, had as Hebrew name
Shmule(k) Zanville. He didn't seem too sure, so I am wondering if his memory
is correct. Shmulek or Szmulek is used by another descendant, I believe that
is a common name. But Zanville? Could he have mis-read or misunderstood
Samuel?
No, he did not misunderstand.

Consider that in German, "Z" is read like English "S", so we might
write the name phonetically as "Sanvil". What your informant heard as
an "N" is actually a nasalized "A" which makes the "N"
indistinguishable >from "M"; the nasalization is a local habit of
speech, so ignore it and write "M", giving you "Samvil". Most European
languages pronounce "W" as English "V", yielding "Samwil", which is
close enough to "Samwel" > "Samuel".

In my own tree there are two men called "Zawel". In their case, the
nasalization wasn't written as "N", because Polish has a special
character for the nasalized "A". It was perceived by your informant as
"N" because writing wasn't involved.

MODERATOR NOTE: The Double name Shmuel Zanvil has been discussed here before.
Please check the Discussion Group Archives at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archpop
As shown above, it isn't really a double name at all, but a single
name with two pronunciations.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above
-- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Re: Names & dates in Indexes often wrong #general

Genealogy@Matrix <Genealogy@...>
 

Hi All,
In response to the below message, I want to remind everyone that the
indexes on the web are very often wrong. The records are often
transcribed by people who don't understand European writing or don't
know Jewish names. Also, the handwritten originals are very hard to decipher!
As an example: My own grandmother's ship record at Ellis Island is
Transcribed as Wrezewsky when it really was Strezewsky. I found it by
getting the naturalization records and finding the ship name & date first.
I found Sabra's relatives in 1920 in Chicago listed as Nevich (rather
than Novick).

In addition, remember that birthdates might also be wrong on ship
records because the immigrants used Hebrew dates that officials
couldn't translate, or on census records because they often rounded
the age to the nearest 5 or 10.

So keep searching!!!

Randy Barbara Messinger
New Haven, CT

Researching: STRIZEWSKY/SRAUSS and HORWITZ/GURWITZ -
Belarus->Philadelphia
ROCHMANN/RICHMAN and SHAPIRO -- Zhitomir, Ukraine-> Philadelphia and
Pittsgrove, New Jersey
MESSINGER & HABER & LINGEL - Zawalow, Austria/Galicia->New York City
REGAN & FERSHING & REISS - Stanislau (Ivano-Frankivsk) ->New York City


Subject: Looking for Info on Tillie NOVICK nee STEIN 1881-1932 Chicago
From: "Sabra Waldfogel" <sawaldfogel@qwest.net>

I'm researching Falick NOVICK, Chicago metalsmith >from Antopol,
Belarus, 1878-1958, and am now curious about his first wife, Tillie.
Before she married, she went by any of three names: her Yiddish name,
Taube STEIN; an Americanized version, Tillie STEIN; and a translation,
Tillie STONE.

According to the census, she was born around 1881 in Russia and
immigrated around 1900. Cook County marriage records show that she
married Falick NOVICK in Chicago on February 19, 1907. She had three
children, all born in Chicago: Mitchell, on February 25, 1908;
Gertrude, in 1915; Herman, on March 30, 1916. >from 1907 until her
death, she worked with her husband in his metalsmithing business, from
1907 to 1920 at 627 W 12th St., and subsequently at 828 E 43rd St.
She's in the Illinois death records as having died in Chicago on May
8, 1932, and she was buried in the Antipol Congregation section of
Chicago's Waldheim Cemetery."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Names & dates in Indexes often wrong #general

Genealogy@Matrix <Genealogy@...>
 

Hi All,
In response to the below message, I want to remind everyone that the
indexes on the web are very often wrong. The records are often
transcribed by people who don't understand European writing or don't
know Jewish names. Also, the handwritten originals are very hard to decipher!
As an example: My own grandmother's ship record at Ellis Island is
Transcribed as Wrezewsky when it really was Strezewsky. I found it by
getting the naturalization records and finding the ship name & date first.
I found Sabra's relatives in 1920 in Chicago listed as Nevich (rather
than Novick).

In addition, remember that birthdates might also be wrong on ship
records because the immigrants used Hebrew dates that officials
couldn't translate, or on census records because they often rounded
the age to the nearest 5 or 10.

So keep searching!!!

Randy Barbara Messinger
New Haven, CT

Researching: STRIZEWSKY/SRAUSS and HORWITZ/GURWITZ -
Belarus->Philadelphia
ROCHMANN/RICHMAN and SHAPIRO -- Zhitomir, Ukraine-> Philadelphia and
Pittsgrove, New Jersey
MESSINGER & HABER & LINGEL - Zawalow, Austria/Galicia->New York City
REGAN & FERSHING & REISS - Stanislau (Ivano-Frankivsk) ->New York City


Subject: Looking for Info on Tillie NOVICK nee STEIN 1881-1932 Chicago
From: "Sabra Waldfogel" <sawaldfogel@qwest.net>

I'm researching Falick NOVICK, Chicago metalsmith >from Antopol,
Belarus, 1878-1958, and am now curious about his first wife, Tillie.
Before she married, she went by any of three names: her Yiddish name,
Taube STEIN; an Americanized version, Tillie STEIN; and a translation,
Tillie STONE.

According to the census, she was born around 1881 in Russia and
immigrated around 1900. Cook County marriage records show that she
married Falick NOVICK in Chicago on February 19, 1907. She had three
children, all born in Chicago: Mitchell, on February 25, 1908;
Gertrude, in 1915; Herman, on March 30, 1916. >from 1907 until her
death, she worked with her husband in his metalsmithing business, from
1907 to 1920 at 627 W 12th St., and subsequently at 828 E 43rd St.
She's in the Illinois death records as having died in Chicago on May
8, 1932, and she was buried in the Antipol Congregation section of
Chicago's Waldheim Cemetery."