Date   

Re: Inherited the project: How do I decide which info is critical? #general

CAROLYNR
 

Hello,

I know at this time it seems that there might be a quick & easy way to
determine the value of some things, and then toss away anything that looks like
"junk" to a Genealogical novice, but I can tell you after having saved the
belongings of several older relatives, that you can not toss anything away until
you have knowledge or have a knowledgeable person go through it piece-by-piece.

In my research I have found very important facts scribbled in the tiniest of
margins of genealogical magazines, or on backs of printed emails or letters,
and things like handwritten map directions to family cemeteries on
restaurant placemats, and all sorts of things that may have been impossible to
find again or know without these scraps.

And... information is often found to be more relevant when in the context of
newly found information and/or family lines.

Although not a certified genealogist, as a service in my data-organization
business, I help people to sort this type of material, cull all possible
details and scraps of information, and log it for use when it makes more sense.
(which of course sometimes may never happen)

Either find someone locally to help you do this or take on all materials
yourself and go through them very carefully, properly sourcing them, detailing
their available data, both obvious and not, and then make decisions of how to
store them. Most genealogical programs have sourcing capability, but even a
simple spreadsheet can be used to index and log what you have.

Take a Genealogy beginners course at your university or a local tech college,
or online, to get a feel for the organizational process. Organization is
important, and as you organize you will see the relationships of personal data
to the historical or back-issues of publications he may have saved...either
by Surname or Location.

If the publications are archived online somewhere, you may be able to throw
some things away, but you can't count on using the right search-terms or even
knowing where to begin looking in an archive without knowing which volumes
seemed relevant to your relative. If he really did save every volume of a
magazine or publication, it may be possible to donate them to your university
library historical rooms and thereby still have access when you need it? Just be
sure to pull any hand-written notes, photos or other "stuff" that may have
been placed within their pages as he did research.

Some materials may be scanned to save space, but you need to be vigilant in
scanning them completely, clearly and securely backing them up on CDs or other
storage devices that can be used and kept safe (and taken quickly away in
case of storms, earthquakes or fires etc.)

...and when the task seems overwhelming, take heart in that he obviously
felt you were a person he could depend on and trust with the hundreds or
thousands of hours of labor he's already put into gathering and beginning this
never-ending quest.

Carolyn Rutherford,
www.RutherfordGenealogy.org

Greetings to you all! I believe my father Irving LEVINE may have been a member
of this discussion group. If that is the case, I'm sorry to inform you that he
passed away in early November rather unexpectedly. But not before extracting
from me a promise to carry on his genealogy work! I am a total novice. I must
confess that I've only paid light attention to what he has already discovered
aside >from the rather amusing fact of the family name actually being SMUGOVICH
prior to immigration to Canada.

Here is my dilemma: he was a man who never threw anything away so there are
not only files on his computer but about 9 packing boxes of related paper files,
publications and I don't really even know yet what all else. I'm going to
need to have the stuff shipped eventually >from Florida.
I have to confess to being quite intimidated by the volume! I'm wondering
if any of you have any practical suggestions for picking up the pieces when not
starting >from scratch, but >from an overabundance of information! I have
read through the FAQs and I know there are back issues of Avoteynu in those boxes
and probably several of the recommended publications as well.

Thanks in advance for any help, pointers or advice!
Deborah Levine
deblev@...
Southern California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Inherited the project: How do I decide which info is critical? #general

CAROLYNR
 

Hello,

I know at this time it seems that there might be a quick & easy way to
determine the value of some things, and then toss away anything that looks like
"junk" to a Genealogical novice, but I can tell you after having saved the
belongings of several older relatives, that you can not toss anything away until
you have knowledge or have a knowledgeable person go through it piece-by-piece.

In my research I have found very important facts scribbled in the tiniest of
margins of genealogical magazines, or on backs of printed emails or letters,
and things like handwritten map directions to family cemeteries on
restaurant placemats, and all sorts of things that may have been impossible to
find again or know without these scraps.

And... information is often found to be more relevant when in the context of
newly found information and/or family lines.

Although not a certified genealogist, as a service in my data-organization
business, I help people to sort this type of material, cull all possible
details and scraps of information, and log it for use when it makes more sense.
(which of course sometimes may never happen)

Either find someone locally to help you do this or take on all materials
yourself and go through them very carefully, properly sourcing them, detailing
their available data, both obvious and not, and then make decisions of how to
store them. Most genealogical programs have sourcing capability, but even a
simple spreadsheet can be used to index and log what you have.

Take a Genealogy beginners course at your university or a local tech college,
or online, to get a feel for the organizational process. Organization is
important, and as you organize you will see the relationships of personal data
to the historical or back-issues of publications he may have saved...either
by Surname or Location.

If the publications are archived online somewhere, you may be able to throw
some things away, but you can't count on using the right search-terms or even
knowing where to begin looking in an archive without knowing which volumes
seemed relevant to your relative. If he really did save every volume of a
magazine or publication, it may be possible to donate them to your university
library historical rooms and thereby still have access when you need it? Just be
sure to pull any hand-written notes, photos or other "stuff" that may have
been placed within their pages as he did research.

Some materials may be scanned to save space, but you need to be vigilant in
scanning them completely, clearly and securely backing them up on CDs or other
storage devices that can be used and kept safe (and taken quickly away in
case of storms, earthquakes or fires etc.)

...and when the task seems overwhelming, take heart in that he obviously
felt you were a person he could depend on and trust with the hundreds or
thousands of hours of labor he's already put into gathering and beginning this
never-ending quest.

Carolyn Rutherford,
www.RutherfordGenealogy.org

Greetings to you all! I believe my father Irving LEVINE may have been a member
of this discussion group. If that is the case, I'm sorry to inform you that he
passed away in early November rather unexpectedly. But not before extracting
from me a promise to carry on his genealogy work! I am a total novice. I must
confess that I've only paid light attention to what he has already discovered
aside >from the rather amusing fact of the family name actually being SMUGOVICH
prior to immigration to Canada.

Here is my dilemma: he was a man who never threw anything away so there are
not only files on his computer but about 9 packing boxes of related paper files,
publications and I don't really even know yet what all else. I'm going to
need to have the stuff shipped eventually >from Florida.
I have to confess to being quite intimidated by the volume! I'm wondering
if any of you have any practical suggestions for picking up the pieces when not
starting >from scratch, but >from an overabundance of information! I have
read through the FAQs and I know there are back issues of Avoteynu in those boxes
and probably several of the recommended publications as well.

Thanks in advance for any help, pointers or advice!
Deborah Levine
deblev@...
Southern California


Translation from Polish Needed #general

Felicia P. Zieff <tzippy_chs@...>
 

Dear friends,

Can someone please translate these 2 pages of a Polish marriage record for
LIEBERMAN, FEIWEL? Below are the viewmate I.D.'s. Please send the
translations directly to me.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7206

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7207

Thank you very much.

Felicia P. Zieff
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation from Polish Needed #general

Felicia P. Zieff <tzippy_chs@...>
 

Dear friends,

Can someone please translate these 2 pages of a Polish marriage record for
LIEBERMAN, FEIWEL? Below are the viewmate I.D.'s. Please send the
translations directly to me.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7206

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7207

Thank you very much.

Felicia P. Zieff
Chicago, IL


SS Mercy Passsenger List-Thank you, Question Answered #general

Barbara Meyers
 

Thank you one and all. I now know how to go about seeking the ship record
for my Uncle thanks to the advice of so many Genners.

Appreciatively,
Barbara Meyers
babycat3@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SS Mercy Passsenger List-Thank you, Question Answered #general

Barbara Meyers
 

Thank you one and all. I now know how to go about seeking the ship record
for my Uncle thanks to the advice of so many Genners.

Appreciatively,
Barbara Meyers
babycat3@...


Contacting Cousins after Divorce #general

clea <clea@...>
 

I would like to hear >from anyone with experience in contacting a descendant
when there has been a divorce in the family. I have had all positive
experiences with contacting distant cousins but feel uncertain about making
this contact and if so how to broach the subject. I will try to sketch the
situation as briefly as possible. Working on my gg-uncle's family I had
posted on Jewishgen a request for help in locating Gustave, Jessie (nee
CAMINSKY) and son Sanford SCHWARTZBAUM. I received a lot of help >from a
wonderful Jewishgenner who located Jessie and Sanford. Jessie and Gus had
divorced and she remarried. The man she remarried died within a few years
and Jessie and Sanford (and Jessie's mother) moved to Hollywood where
Jessie's brother, Irving, had gone as a teen and by the 1930s had become
well known. He had changed his last name to CUMMINGS. Sanford also changed
his last name to Cummings.

I recently ordered an obit for Sanford and I am fairly certain I have the
right person. I have located one of his daughters and want to call her to
verify that I am still on the right track.

My two concerns are 1) that she does not know her father's real last name -
he was about 8 yrs old when the divorce occurred. He not only did not keep
his father's name, he also did not keep the stepfather's name (used in 1930
census and who was Jewish) and his mother's maiden name was given as
CUMMINGS rather than CAMINSKY in her obit - even her mother began to use
Cummings. Apparently they Americanized the name or began using it when
Irving became well known. This would be no secret to her - the information
is available on the internet.

2) In the obit he is Roman Catholic so he would have converted at some point
if I have the right person

I am very excited to have finally made a breakthrough in this part of the
family. But I am not sure how to approach this. Interestingly, my own story
is similar. I found out my father's real name (Schwarzbaum) when he died -
he had used his stepfather's name and had converted to the Episcopal church.

Carolyn Lea
Ohio
clea@...
ID# 152314

Researching: SCHWARZBAUM/SCHWARTZBAUM > Posen>New York and Savannah, Georgia
ROTHSCHILD/ROTHCHILD> Prussia> Darien and Savannah, Georgia
BASCH>Prussia>Savannah, Georgia LEVISON> Prussia> Brunswick and Savannah,
Georgia OPPENHEIM > Savannah, Georgia WEINBERG > Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Contacting Cousins after Divorce #general

clea <clea@...>
 

I would like to hear >from anyone with experience in contacting a descendant
when there has been a divorce in the family. I have had all positive
experiences with contacting distant cousins but feel uncertain about making
this contact and if so how to broach the subject. I will try to sketch the
situation as briefly as possible. Working on my gg-uncle's family I had
posted on Jewishgen a request for help in locating Gustave, Jessie (nee
CAMINSKY) and son Sanford SCHWARTZBAUM. I received a lot of help >from a
wonderful Jewishgenner who located Jessie and Sanford. Jessie and Gus had
divorced and she remarried. The man she remarried died within a few years
and Jessie and Sanford (and Jessie's mother) moved to Hollywood where
Jessie's brother, Irving, had gone as a teen and by the 1930s had become
well known. He had changed his last name to CUMMINGS. Sanford also changed
his last name to Cummings.

I recently ordered an obit for Sanford and I am fairly certain I have the
right person. I have located one of his daughters and want to call her to
verify that I am still on the right track.

My two concerns are 1) that she does not know her father's real last name -
he was about 8 yrs old when the divorce occurred. He not only did not keep
his father's name, he also did not keep the stepfather's name (used in 1930
census and who was Jewish) and his mother's maiden name was given as
CUMMINGS rather than CAMINSKY in her obit - even her mother began to use
Cummings. Apparently they Americanized the name or began using it when
Irving became well known. This would be no secret to her - the information
is available on the internet.

2) In the obit he is Roman Catholic so he would have converted at some point
if I have the right person

I am very excited to have finally made a breakthrough in this part of the
family. But I am not sure how to approach this. Interestingly, my own story
is similar. I found out my father's real name (Schwarzbaum) when he died -
he had used his stepfather's name and had converted to the Episcopal church.

Carolyn Lea
Ohio
clea@...
ID# 152314

Researching: SCHWARZBAUM/SCHWARTZBAUM > Posen>New York and Savannah, Georgia
ROTHSCHILD/ROTHCHILD> Prussia> Darien and Savannah, Georgia
BASCH>Prussia>Savannah, Georgia LEVISON> Prussia> Brunswick and Savannah,
Georgia OPPENHEIM > Savannah, Georgia WEINBERG > Georgia


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jewsih Origins #lithuania

Elliott Porte <elliott.porte@...>
 

The subject of Cossack rapes and other crimes committed by the Tsarist
regimes is, I think, open to some conjecture. True, one might be tempted
to question why some of our Litvak families have blue eyes and blond
hair and wander down the route of rape rather than genetic/family
traits. I've questioned members of my cousin's blue eyed, blond haired
family for some indication of such crimes but the view of that family is
that they have had such eye/hair colouring for many generations. I
understand it also true that some indigenous families converted to
Judaism (not quite so problematic as you might think).

Certainly the story/myth in my family is that women wore wigs/shytels to
disguise the fact that they had shaved their hair i.e. to make them less
attractive to the marauding soldiers - again, this may be more myth than
fact.

Elliott Porte

PORT/PURTE - Lithuania


Birthdates on Polish Birth Registers #general

sangreenb@...
 

Hello: Can someone out there give me an opinion on the timing of birth
registrations in the Polish records circa 1850's?

How many of you came across a birth date of your ancestor that you felt was
incorrect in the Polish records? And if so, how common was it to have a son's
birth registered years later?

My ancestor's birth records states that he was, "born today"? Was it a usual
practice for Jews to register a son's birth on the same day that he was born?

Did the threat of the draft of young boys have anything to do with
registering a birth years after the son was born?

Your answers and opinions will be greatly appreciated as I puzzle through it
all.

Best regards,

Sandra Greenberg
Denver, CO
_sangreenb@... (mailto:sangreenb@...)

CHOLEWA/COHN/LESNIK, Golub Dobrzyn, Poland
HERMAN - Kolomea, Sniatzyn, Austria, now Ukraine
NEUBURGER - Saveni/Botosani, Romania
CHAIES - Botosani, Romania
BEN DAVID/GRINBERG - Bivolari/Iasi, Romania
CHAIT/CHAET - Pukovitzi/Minsk, Belarus


Jewsih Origins #lithuania

Elliott Porte <elliott.porte@...>
 

The subject of Cossack rapes and other crimes committed by the Tsarist
regimes is, I think, open to some conjecture. True, one might be tempted
to question why some of our Litvak families have blue eyes and blond
hair and wander down the route of rape rather than genetic/family
traits. I've questioned members of my cousin's blue eyed, blond haired
family for some indication of such crimes but the view of that family is
that they have had such eye/hair colouring for many generations. I
understand it also true that some indigenous families converted to
Judaism (not quite so problematic as you might think).

Certainly the story/myth in my family is that women wore wigs/shytels to
disguise the fact that they had shaved their hair i.e. to make them less
attractive to the marauding soldiers - again, this may be more myth than
fact.

Elliott Porte

PORT/PURTE - Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Birthdates on Polish Birth Registers #general

sangreenb@...
 

Hello: Can someone out there give me an opinion on the timing of birth
registrations in the Polish records circa 1850's?

How many of you came across a birth date of your ancestor that you felt was
incorrect in the Polish records? And if so, how common was it to have a son's
birth registered years later?

My ancestor's birth records states that he was, "born today"? Was it a usual
practice for Jews to register a son's birth on the same day that he was born?

Did the threat of the draft of young boys have anything to do with
registering a birth years after the son was born?

Your answers and opinions will be greatly appreciated as I puzzle through it
all.

Best regards,

Sandra Greenberg
Denver, CO
_sangreenb@... (mailto:sangreenb@...)

CHOLEWA/COHN/LESNIK, Golub Dobrzyn, Poland
HERMAN - Kolomea, Sniatzyn, Austria, now Ukraine
NEUBURGER - Saveni/Botosani, Romania
CHAIES - Botosani, Romania
BEN DAVID/GRINBERG - Bivolari/Iasi, Romania
CHAIT/CHAET - Pukovitzi/Minsk, Belarus


Descendents of Jacob WEINER from Baltimore #general

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

I am researching the family of Harry and Katie WEINER for their
grandson and have determined that Harry had a brother Jacob who died
sometime before 1930. I would like to make contact with Jacob's descendents.

According to the 1910 census, Jacob and his wife Eva were living at
236 S. Eden St. in Baltimore with their children Frank, Sam, Simon
and Hyman (or Herman). By 1930, the family, headed by Eva, was
living at 2712 Classen Ave. Ephraim, Florence, Bessie, and Albert
had been added.

I would appreciate any information regarding this family.

Debra Price
Plainview, NY

PRUCE/PRUSEL - Kovno Gub. (possibly Vabalninkas or Kupreliskis) to Baltimore
WEINER/WEINEREIS - Gorodnitsa and Rovno, Volhynia Gub., Ukraine to Baltimore
GOLDSTEIN - Lomza (?) to Baltimore
PUMPIAN(SKY) - Kovno Gub. (possibly Pakruojis), to Baltimore


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendents of Jacob WEINER from Baltimore #general

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

I am researching the family of Harry and Katie WEINER for their
grandson and have determined that Harry had a brother Jacob who died
sometime before 1930. I would like to make contact with Jacob's descendents.

According to the 1910 census, Jacob and his wife Eva were living at
236 S. Eden St. in Baltimore with their children Frank, Sam, Simon
and Hyman (or Herman). By 1930, the family, headed by Eva, was
living at 2712 Classen Ave. Ephraim, Florence, Bessie, and Albert
had been added.

I would appreciate any information regarding this family.

Debra Price
Plainview, NY

PRUCE/PRUSEL - Kovno Gub. (possibly Vabalninkas or Kupreliskis) to Baltimore
WEINER/WEINEREIS - Gorodnitsa and Rovno, Volhynia Gub., Ukraine to Baltimore
GOLDSTEIN - Lomza (?) to Baltimore
PUMPIAN(SKY) - Kovno Gub. (possibly Pakruojis), to Baltimore


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania The Wandering Jew and how Jews look #lithuania

Meri-Jane Rochelson <rochelso@...>
 

Some years ago I read an article in the Jerusalem Post reporting on the
work of an Israeli anthropologist. This scholar found that rape by
non-Jews was not an especially significant factor in why Jews so often
resemble the non-Jews in the places where they have settled. She came
to the conclusion that a more important factor was a form of natural
selection: that Jews who looked sufficiently like others to "pass" were
more likely to be spared during acts of violence precipitated against
Jews; thus they were more likely to live to reproduce and pass on the
genes that made them look like those in the surrounding area. I don't
know how that research is regarded today, but I think it's an
interesting idea.

Meri-Jane Rochelson
Miami, FL

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Just a reminder that this thread will end at 10 p.m.
Eastern US time, Monday, Dec. 12.


Seeking: Joseph CHAIMBUNSKI #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

I spent a lovely two evenings with my maternal first cousin, who finally
decided to pay a visit to Israel. We hadn't seen each other in about 15
years. We talked about our common family, then I remembered a story about
her father's family, who is unrelated to me.

The story goes that when her great grandfather got to Ellis Island, he
thought he was supposed to give his first name, last. So he said he was
'CHAIMBUNSKI, Joseph'. Thus, my cousin's maiden surname was JOSEPH.

I asked her where this great grandfather came from, and she said 'Kitna'
Poland, and she can't figure out what that might be. I'm pretty sure it was
Kutno.

So, is anyone aware of a CHAIMBUNSKI >from Kutno? I'd love to surprise my
favorite cousin on her return home with an e-mail containing info on this
branch of her family. Nothing comes up on the JGFF, and the closest match in
JRI Poland is Gombinski.
Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


The Wandering Jew and how Jews look #lithuania

Meri-Jane Rochelson <rochelso@...>
 

Some years ago I read an article in the Jerusalem Post reporting on the
work of an Israeli anthropologist. This scholar found that rape by
non-Jews was not an especially significant factor in why Jews so often
resemble the non-Jews in the places where they have settled. She came
to the conclusion that a more important factor was a form of natural
selection: that Jews who looked sufficiently like others to "pass" were
more likely to be spared during acts of violence precipitated against
Jews; thus they were more likely to live to reproduce and pass on the
genes that made them look like those in the surrounding area. I don't
know how that research is regarded today, but I think it's an
interesting idea.

Meri-Jane Rochelson
Miami, FL

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Just a reminder that this thread will end at 10 p.m.
Eastern US time, Monday, Dec. 12.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking: Joseph CHAIMBUNSKI #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

I spent a lovely two evenings with my maternal first cousin, who finally
decided to pay a visit to Israel. We hadn't seen each other in about 15
years. We talked about our common family, then I remembered a story about
her father's family, who is unrelated to me.

The story goes that when her great grandfather got to Ellis Island, he
thought he was supposed to give his first name, last. So he said he was
'CHAIMBUNSKI, Joseph'. Thus, my cousin's maiden surname was JOSEPH.

I asked her where this great grandfather came from, and she said 'Kitna'
Poland, and she can't figure out what that might be. I'm pretty sure it was
Kutno.

So, is anyone aware of a CHAIMBUNSKI >from Kutno? I'd love to surprise my
favorite cousin on her return home with an e-mail containing info on this
branch of her family. Nothing comes up on the JGFF, and the closest match in
JRI Poland is Gombinski.
Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


Translation help for Kolo Yizkor Book Index #general

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

If someone would be willing to proofread the index for the Kolo Yizkor book
which is in both Hebrew and Yiddish I would be very grateful for the help.
Please contact me privately.

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles


Latke tradition #poland

philapple@...
 

Sweet foods are characteristic of Polish Jews (my guess is, Congress
Poland only), and sugar on latkes is definitely part of that custom.
My late mother came >from Jadow, northeast of Warsaw, and when she served
latkes, she always put sugar on top, and that was how we ate them
(along with a glass -- not a cup, mind you -- of tea).
My late father came >from Konstantynow, north of Biala Podlaska, and he
also ate latkes with sugar. My mother also made sweet gefilte fish.

Phillip Applebaum
Oak Park, Michigan, USA