Date   

Two brothers listed as one and surname change to become Only Son #general

GDLProject@...
 

In records >from Lithuania for both my paternal (northern Lithuania)
and maternal (southeastern Lithuania) two brothers are listed as one person. I
don't know why although I assume that it may have something to do with
trying to avoid the Russian draft. I am curious to know how >common this
practice was. Has anyone else come across such records?

Harold Rhode
Yes, the practice of combining two brothers into a single person on revision
lists did occur, and I am sure that your assumption about the reason is
right.

This poses difficult problems for genealogists tracing our ancestors and is
adds to the argument that the more data >from different sources that we can
find, the better.

Another situation occurred in my family where one of two brothers, both of
whom were listed in the Ariogala FRIEDLAND family in 1874, became
non-draftable "only sons", when one of them changed his surname to FRIEDMAN and
was listed separately >from the FRIEDLAND family's household.

David Hoffman
Encino, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Two brothers listed as one and surname change to become Only Son #general

GDLProject@...
 

In records >from Lithuania for both my paternal (northern Lithuania)
and maternal (southeastern Lithuania) two brothers are listed as one person. I
don't know why although I assume that it may have something to do with
trying to avoid the Russian draft. I am curious to know how >common this
practice was. Has anyone else come across such records?

Harold Rhode
Yes, the practice of combining two brothers into a single person on revision
lists did occur, and I am sure that your assumption about the reason is
right.

This poses difficult problems for genealogists tracing our ancestors and is
adds to the argument that the more data >from different sources that we can
find, the better.

Another situation occurred in my family where one of two brothers, both of
whom were listed in the Ariogala FRIEDLAND family in 1874, became
non-draftable "only sons", when one of them changed his surname to FRIEDMAN and
was listed separately >from the FRIEDLAND family's household.

David Hoffman
Encino, CA


finding a passenger list #general

Kaye Paletz <mpaletz@...>
 

I was told that an ancestor came to Philadelphia in 1891. I looked him
up on the Steven Morse cite for Ny, Castle Garden, Philadelphia
Baltimore and boston with various spellings as well as the Hamburg
lists. What other suggestions are there for finding this individual.
Kaye Paletz kpaletz@njstatelib.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen finding a passenger list #general

Kaye Paletz <mpaletz@...>
 

I was told that an ancestor came to Philadelphia in 1891. I looked him
up on the Steven Morse cite for Ny, Castle Garden, Philadelphia
Baltimore and boston with various spellings as well as the Hamburg
lists. What other suggestions are there for finding this individual.
Kaye Paletz kpaletz@njstatelib.org


Name changes #general

dotvic <dotvic@...>
 

I haven't been paying much attention to the discussion about children born
our of "civil wedlock" until last week when my 86 year old uncle remembered
his father telling him that his (my grandfather's) real name was MAURER not
BERGSTEIN.

A light bulb went on inside my head when I realized I should be looking for
Oscar MAURER in Ulanov. Maybe that's why I can't get any info >from the
Polish records for him.

Evidently his mother, Ruchla MAURER and father, Simon BERGSTEIN weren't
married in a civil ceremony so the children carried Ruchla's maiden name.
My uncle and I figured how we came to be BERGSTEINs. Grandpa went from
Ulanow to Budapest where he worked for a while before leaving for the USA.
We think he fled his homeland and changed his name to stay out of the army!

So, it's back to square one. I *love* genealogy!

Dorothy AUERBACH Rivers
Tucson, Arizona USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name changes #general

dotvic <dotvic@...>
 

I haven't been paying much attention to the discussion about children born
our of "civil wedlock" until last week when my 86 year old uncle remembered
his father telling him that his (my grandfather's) real name was MAURER not
BERGSTEIN.

A light bulb went on inside my head when I realized I should be looking for
Oscar MAURER in Ulanov. Maybe that's why I can't get any info >from the
Polish records for him.

Evidently his mother, Ruchla MAURER and father, Simon BERGSTEIN weren't
married in a civil ceremony so the children carried Ruchla's maiden name.
My uncle and I figured how we came to be BERGSTEINs. Grandpa went from
Ulanow to Budapest where he worked for a while before leaving for the USA.
We think he fled his homeland and changed his name to stay out of the army!

So, it's back to square one. I *love* genealogy!

Dorothy AUERBACH Rivers
Tucson, Arizona USA


naming babies who die #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

I would like to start a new thread.
Would like to know if any of you out there have heard of a
tradition by which of a baby who died at or a short time=20
after birth are given a name.
In addition to Jewish traditions, there are statutory imperatives which
may determine if a stillborn child is named or not. Today, this will be
based on gestational age. In New Zealand a baby who dies before 21
weeks cannot be buried and will not receive a death certificate.
According to the Births, Deaths and Marriage Registration Act, at 21
weeks, it is a fetus and not a child. While this may seem logical, as
we can't today save 21 week babies, only 20 years ago, the gestational
limit for declaring the death of a baby was 28 weeks. Today 28 week
babies are regularly saved. This brings to mind recollections >from my
own nursing training in the early 80s when I helped looked after a 28
week premature infant, born tragically after his older siblings perished
in a house fire. The staff looked upon the child with horror as a
'failed miscarriage.' Today, of course, infants of this
gestation are regularly nurtured to adulthood, witnessing to the
advancement of the technical ability of the medical community to
resuscitate premature infants.

Midwives recall the difficulties encountered when a multiple birth took =
place before the then-statutory definition of viability at 28 weeks. =
One twin might not survive birth, while another might live, or die =
later. The twin who did not survive birth could not be registered while =
his or her sibling could.

Families may very well experience the death of a "fetus" as the death of
a "child" and this can create the potential for family accounts which
differ >from vital records. For many countries, these children never
existed.

Annemarie Jutel
Wellington, NZ

Researching:
DROZDOWITZ/DROZDOWICZ/DROZDOW/DROSDOWITZ of Plonsk, Zakroczym, Chicago, =
Ogden (UT), Indianapolis and New York. GOLDSTEIN Marijampol, HIRSCHLER =
Manheim and Hessheim, MANHEIM Ottensoos, San Francisco, KAHN Hannover, =
San Francisco LOEB Strasbourg, San Francisco and STEINBERG =
Marijampole(?), Louisville, KY

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep this thread to the original topic of naming babies
who die at birth. Abortions, preemies and laws thereof are not in keeping with
this discussion groups parameters.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen naming babies who die #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

I would like to start a new thread.
Would like to know if any of you out there have heard of a
tradition by which of a baby who died at or a short time=20
after birth are given a name.
In addition to Jewish traditions, there are statutory imperatives which
may determine if a stillborn child is named or not. Today, this will be
based on gestational age. In New Zealand a baby who dies before 21
weeks cannot be buried and will not receive a death certificate.
According to the Births, Deaths and Marriage Registration Act, at 21
weeks, it is a fetus and not a child. While this may seem logical, as
we can't today save 21 week babies, only 20 years ago, the gestational
limit for declaring the death of a baby was 28 weeks. Today 28 week
babies are regularly saved. This brings to mind recollections >from my
own nursing training in the early 80s when I helped looked after a 28
week premature infant, born tragically after his older siblings perished
in a house fire. The staff looked upon the child with horror as a
'failed miscarriage.' Today, of course, infants of this
gestation are regularly nurtured to adulthood, witnessing to the
advancement of the technical ability of the medical community to
resuscitate premature infants.

Midwives recall the difficulties encountered when a multiple birth took =
place before the then-statutory definition of viability at 28 weeks. =
One twin might not survive birth, while another might live, or die =
later. The twin who did not survive birth could not be registered while =
his or her sibling could.

Families may very well experience the death of a "fetus" as the death of
a "child" and this can create the potential for family accounts which
differ >from vital records. For many countries, these children never
existed.

Annemarie Jutel
Wellington, NZ

Researching:
DROZDOWITZ/DROZDOWICZ/DROZDOW/DROSDOWITZ of Plonsk, Zakroczym, Chicago, =
Ogden (UT), Indianapolis and New York. GOLDSTEIN Marijampol, HIRSCHLER =
Manheim and Hessheim, MANHEIM Ottensoos, San Francisco, KAHN Hannover, =
San Francisco LOEB Strasbourg, San Francisco and STEINBERG =
Marijampole(?), Louisville, KY

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep this thread to the original topic of naming babies
who die at birth. Abortions, preemies and laws thereof are not in keeping with
this discussion groups parameters.


National Geographic Genographic Study #romania

fbandjd@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Both my husband and I have recently received the results of our DNA
>from National Geographic's Genographic Study. This is not a geneology
study, but instead is designed to trace your ethnic origins. Females
have their mt DNA analyzed and that traces their direct maternal line,
while males take the Y DNA test for their direct paternal line. My
brother and my husband's female cousin on his maternal line are also
participating.

Early members of my Haplogroup lived in the Eastern Mediterranean and
Near East region, and was part of the first group to arrive in Europe
some 30,000 years ago. My husband's Haplogroup evolved in the Middle
East and expanded into the Mediterranean. It currently is distributed
around the Mediterranean and Southern Europe. Of course, we all came
out of Africa.

If anyone is interested they can get additional information by going to:

www.nationalgeographic.com/genographic

Best Regards,
Fran Meng
Walnut Creek, CA
fbandjd@aol.com


Romania SIG #Romania National Geographic Genographic Study #romania

fbandjd@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Both my husband and I have recently received the results of our DNA
>from National Geographic's Genographic Study. This is not a geneology
study, but instead is designed to trace your ethnic origins. Females
have their mt DNA analyzed and that traces their direct maternal line,
while males take the Y DNA test for their direct paternal line. My
brother and my husband's female cousin on his maternal line are also
participating.

Early members of my Haplogroup lived in the Eastern Mediterranean and
Near East region, and was part of the first group to arrive in Europe
some 30,000 years ago. My husband's Haplogroup evolved in the Middle
East and expanded into the Mediterranean. It currently is distributed
around the Mediterranean and Southern Europe. Of course, we all came
out of Africa.

If anyone is interested they can get additional information by going to:

www.nationalgeographic.com/genographic

Best Regards,
Fran Meng
Walnut Creek, CA
fbandjd@aol.com


Library "BOF" #belarus

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Are any library staff (current or retired) attending the IAJGS
Conference in Las Vegas? Do you think you might actually find a few free
moments to have a "schmooze" session? If so, please contact me. I was
thinking mostly in terms of dinner or after-dinner as possible times.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA
laguna@sciti.com


Library "BOF" #romania

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Are any library staff (current or retired) attending the IAJGS
Conference in Las Vegas? Do you think you might actually find a few free
moments to have a "schmooze" session? If so, please contact me. I was
thinking mostly in terms of dinner or after-dinner as possible times.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA
laguna@sciti.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Library "BOF" #belarus

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Are any library staff (current or retired) attending the IAJGS
Conference in Las Vegas? Do you think you might actually find a few free
moments to have a "schmooze" session? If so, please contact me. I was
thinking mostly in terms of dinner or after-dinner as possible times.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA
laguna@sciti.com


Romania SIG #Romania Library "BOF" #romania

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Are any library staff (current or retired) attending the IAJGS
Conference in Las Vegas? Do you think you might actually find a few free
moments to have a "schmooze" session? If so, please contact me. I was
thinking mostly in terms of dinner or after-dinner as possible times.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA
laguna@sciti.com


Russian Army service #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,

In last quarter of 19th century how long was army service?
At what age was a man/ boy called up?

Would someone be able to confirm that the following tale is likely to be
correct. .
The one remaining living child of my grandfather's brother says her father
did 2 stints of army service one in his own name and one in my GF's name at
the request of my GGmother, his mother. She thought my apparently sickly GF
would not survive.
I have a copy of a paper >from the Lithuanian Archives stating that my GF
went to the army (Went to his call up or actually served is not clear)
whereas his nephew had not complied.
Naturally I presumed GF had at least been called up, possibly discharged as
sickly, but now great uncle's daughter says probably her father went in his
own name and also as big brother.

Big brother was 5 years older than baby brother. Big brother was of small
stature. Baby brother was big.
Apparently 2 of his children were born while he was in the army. This would
be when baby brother was in his late 20's or early 30's.

Thank you
Ros Romem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian Army service #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,

In last quarter of 19th century how long was army service?
At what age was a man/ boy called up?

Would someone be able to confirm that the following tale is likely to be
correct. .
The one remaining living child of my grandfather's brother says her father
did 2 stints of army service one in his own name and one in my GF's name at
the request of my GGmother, his mother. She thought my apparently sickly GF
would not survive.
I have a copy of a paper >from the Lithuanian Archives stating that my GF
went to the army (Went to his call up or actually served is not clear)
whereas his nephew had not complied.
Naturally I presumed GF had at least been called up, possibly discharged as
sickly, but now great uncle's daughter says probably her father went in his
own name and also as big brother.

Big brother was 5 years older than baby brother. Big brother was of small
stature. Baby brother was big.
Apparently 2 of his children were born while he was in the army. This would
be when baby brother was in his late 20's or early 30's.

Thank you
Ros Romem


Knyazhe-Timanov modern name? #general

robert roudman <rcroudman@...>
 

Hello, I am trying to determine where Tomanof in Moldava/Bessarbia is
located and what the modern name would be. My grandfather listed Tomanof as
his birthplace. I believe he was born near Tiraspol or Tighnia in today's
Moldava. I found a reference to a Timinov in a birth record that I believe
to be the Tomanof I am looking for. The record is as follows:
Bessarabia Father petty bourgeois >from Knyazhe-Timanov /
Kniazshe-Tumanivke, Moil/Mohel: Moishe BRIMER Kishinev. Can anyone tell me
where Knyazhe-Timanov / Knaizshe-Tumanivke might be located and what the
modern name would be?
Thank you,
Bob Roudman
San Rafael, CA
KRUTANSKY, CHALIK, Moldava; RUDMAN, MALTZMAN, KAPLAN, MILLNER, Ukraine,
Lithuania, Latvia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Knyazhe-Timanov modern name? #general

robert roudman <rcroudman@...>
 

Hello, I am trying to determine where Tomanof in Moldava/Bessarbia is
located and what the modern name would be. My grandfather listed Tomanof as
his birthplace. I believe he was born near Tiraspol or Tighnia in today's
Moldava. I found a reference to a Timinov in a birth record that I believe
to be the Tomanof I am looking for. The record is as follows:
Bessarabia Father petty bourgeois >from Knyazhe-Timanov /
Kniazshe-Tumanivke, Moil/Mohel: Moishe BRIMER Kishinev. Can anyone tell me
where Knyazhe-Timanov / Knaizshe-Tumanivke might be located and what the
modern name would be?
Thank you,
Bob Roudman
San Rafael, CA
KRUTANSKY, CHALIK, Moldava; RUDMAN, MALTZMAN, KAPLAN, MILLNER, Ukraine,
Lithuania, Latvia.


Barnato family questions #general

bxzi@...
 

3 quick questions:

1) Was Jack Barnato the son or the nephew of Barney Barnato?

2) Was his widow (Dorothy or Dorothee) of Jewish ancestry?

3) Did they have any children?

Thanks for everyone's help.

Brooke Morris
bxzi@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Barnato family questions #general

bxzi@...
 

3 quick questions:

1) Was Jack Barnato the son or the nephew of Barney Barnato?

2) Was his widow (Dorothy or Dorothee) of Jewish ancestry?

3) Did they have any children?

Thanks for everyone's help.

Brooke Morris
bxzi@yahoo.com