Date   

Found My Sussholz Connection #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to everyone who helped me to find members of the Sussholz family
from Michalovce. I located the son of the woman who submitted the Page
of Testimony. Moreover, I found out that his grandfather is the
MOSKOVITS Leopold who is buried near my great-grandparents.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Found My Sussholz Connection #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to everyone who helped me to find members of the Sussholz family
from Michalovce. I located the son of the woman who submitted the Page
of Testimony. Moreover, I found out that his grandfather is the
MOSKOVITS Leopold who is buried near my great-grandparents.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA


Seeking Lotte GERNSHEIMER-MAINZER #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hans-martinunger@...>
 

Looking for the exact datre of death of Lotte Gernsheimer-Mainzer
born 3-7-1913 in Heppenheim/Bergstrasse-Germany
married to Salomon ( Sally ) Gernsheimer of Viernheim/Germany
lived in 1979 in New York Very best

Hansmartin Unger St. Gallen, Switz. <hans-martinunger@...>


German SIG #Germany Seeking Lotte GERNSHEIMER-MAINZER #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hans-martinunger@...>
 

Looking for the exact datre of death of Lotte Gernsheimer-Mainzer
born 3-7-1913 in Heppenheim/Bergstrasse-Germany
married to Salomon ( Sally ) Gernsheimer of Viernheim/Germany
lived in 1979 in New York Very best

Hansmartin Unger St. Gallen, Switz. <hans-martinunger@...>


INTRO- Georg VOLTZ 1612-1670, Wuerttemberg #germany

Ms Sarah Walls <walnut1946@...>
 

Hello,
I am a novice at researching in Germany and am intermediate at using the internet
and a computer e.g. people are always suggesting that I cut and paste
something or other but I don't know how. I know only English with a little bit
of Hebrew. I live in St Petersburg, Florida, in the United States.

My primary purpose for this posting is to learn what I can of other family
members of or the grandparents of Georg VOLTZ and his wife Margaretha HORCH of
Wuerttemberg, Kreis, Neckar, Germany.

Georg VOLTZ was born in 1612 and died in 1670. I have his son listed
as Johann Jacob VOLTZ born 1667 and died 1735 and he was married to Maria
Margaretha DIEHM. This family lived in this area and the surrounding villages of
Grossgarttach.

I have an idea that the VOLTZ line in my family is derived >from my last name of
WALLS but of course I may be wrong but I have seen this name spelled VOLZ which
isn't so far away in pronunciation >from WALLS.

And I have a very strong feeling based on I don't know
what that we are Sephardic Jews.

I got this information I am listing here >from a VOLTZ researcher whom I do not
know so I cannot personally verify the data.

I am looking forward to getting to know all of you and hope in the future I may
be of help to you in your research.

Sarah Jane WALLS St Petersburg, Florida USA walnut1946@...

Researching: WALLS, WALL, FULTZ, FOLTZ, FOLZ, VOLZ,
WILBURN, PONSTLER, PONCLER, DA VALLE, SHERROW


German SIG #Germany INTRO- Georg VOLTZ 1612-1670, Wuerttemberg #germany

Ms Sarah Walls <walnut1946@...>
 

Hello,
I am a novice at researching in Germany and am intermediate at using the internet
and a computer e.g. people are always suggesting that I cut and paste
something or other but I don't know how. I know only English with a little bit
of Hebrew. I live in St Petersburg, Florida, in the United States.

My primary purpose for this posting is to learn what I can of other family
members of or the grandparents of Georg VOLTZ and his wife Margaretha HORCH of
Wuerttemberg, Kreis, Neckar, Germany.

Georg VOLTZ was born in 1612 and died in 1670. I have his son listed
as Johann Jacob VOLTZ born 1667 and died 1735 and he was married to Maria
Margaretha DIEHM. This family lived in this area and the surrounding villages of
Grossgarttach.

I have an idea that the VOLTZ line in my family is derived >from my last name of
WALLS but of course I may be wrong but I have seen this name spelled VOLZ which
isn't so far away in pronunciation >from WALLS.

And I have a very strong feeling based on I don't know
what that we are Sephardic Jews.

I got this information I am listing here >from a VOLTZ researcher whom I do not
know so I cannot personally verify the data.

I am looking forward to getting to know all of you and hope in the future I may
be of help to you in your research.

Sarah Jane WALLS St Petersburg, Florida USA walnut1946@...

Researching: WALLS, WALL, FULTZ, FOLTZ, FOLZ, VOLZ,
WILBURN, PONSTLER, PONCLER, DA VALLE, SHERROW


Researching Chernin-Czernin family of Belarus #general

SUSAN CHERNIN <suechernin@...>
 

I ask this question several years ago but as there are new members I would
like to post it again.
Seeking information on Moise CZERNIN originally of Vitebsk. Served in
Russian army in 1918 and married twice. Family lost contact during WWII.
Looking for any family members
Reply to susan.l.chernin@...
Researching CHERNIN, CZERNIN,CHANIN,SAVADOVE,SAVADOFKY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching Chernin-Czernin family of Belarus #general

SUSAN CHERNIN <suechernin@...>
 

I ask this question several years ago but as there are new members I would
like to post it again.
Seeking information on Moise CZERNIN originally of Vitebsk. Served in
Russian army in 1918 and married twice. Family lost contact during WWII.
Looking for any family members
Reply to susan.l.chernin@...
Researching CHERNIN, CZERNIN,CHANIN,SAVADOVE,SAVADOFKY


LOEB famlily from Philippsburg #germany

Allan Hirsh
 

As part of my ROSENTHAL tree I am searching for descendants of the LOEB family.

Moses LOEB born in Philippsburg Germany married Mina ROSENTHAL born Feb. 16,
1825 in Liedolsheim Germany. Their children who lived longer than a year all
born in Philippsburg Germany were Karl, Emily, Rosalie, Nathan, Joseph,
Babette, and Abraham. Any information on this family would be appreciated

Allan Hirsh Baltimore, MD Allanhirsh@...


German SIG #Germany LOEB famlily from Philippsburg #germany

Allan Hirsh
 

As part of my ROSENTHAL tree I am searching for descendants of the LOEB family.

Moses LOEB born in Philippsburg Germany married Mina ROSENTHAL born Feb. 16,
1825 in Liedolsheim Germany. Their children who lived longer than a year all
born in Philippsburg Germany were Karl, Emily, Rosalie, Nathan, Joseph,
Babette, and Abraham. Any information on this family would be appreciated

Allan Hirsh Baltimore, MD Allanhirsh@...


Confusion about 3G Grandmother's name: GRUENEWALD ? STRASS ? #germany

karen <karendesign@...>
 

I have a surname puzzle in regards to my GGGG grandmother, and need some
help in order to decipher her name. According to a book written by Arnold
Ruby her name was Johanetta (Susanna) GRUENEWALD, former name Schoenel
AARON, married to Isaac STRASS, and having 7 children. Later, and this was
according to the book Isaac married Susanna BEILDECK and had 2 more
children. Please keep in mind Johannetta died in 1849, and was not deceased
at the time of this so called second marriage. The marriage document for her
first child, Ester in 1818 lists her name as Susanna, born Gruenewald;
marriage of son Levy in 1828 finds her listed as Johannetta nee Gruenewald,
and the youngest child, married in 1838 finds her name to be Susanna
Beildeck. According to the 1808 Sembach name register her name is Susanna
BEILDECK, former name Schoenel AARON. In conclusion the husbands name stays
constant as Isaac STRASS, and according to his death document in 1826, she
is listed as Johannetta GRUENEWALD, his wife. Finally, her death document
dated 1849 lists her as the widow of Isaac STRASS, and her name is
Johannetta GRUENEWALD! So far I have not been able to find the marriage
document for Isaac STRASS and Susanna/Johanetta BIELDECK/GRUENEWALD or find
previous information in regards to her roots in Neuhemsbach, where she was
born. Can anyone help me?

Karen Brown, California, karendesign@...


German SIG #Germany Confusion about 3G Grandmother's name: GRUENEWALD ? STRASS ? #germany

karen <karendesign@...>
 

I have a surname puzzle in regards to my GGGG grandmother, and need some
help in order to decipher her name. According to a book written by Arnold
Ruby her name was Johanetta (Susanna) GRUENEWALD, former name Schoenel
AARON, married to Isaac STRASS, and having 7 children. Later, and this was
according to the book Isaac married Susanna BEILDECK and had 2 more
children. Please keep in mind Johannetta died in 1849, and was not deceased
at the time of this so called second marriage. The marriage document for her
first child, Ester in 1818 lists her name as Susanna, born Gruenewald;
marriage of son Levy in 1828 finds her listed as Johannetta nee Gruenewald,
and the youngest child, married in 1838 finds her name to be Susanna
Beildeck. According to the 1808 Sembach name register her name is Susanna
BEILDECK, former name Schoenel AARON. In conclusion the husbands name stays
constant as Isaac STRASS, and according to his death document in 1826, she
is listed as Johannetta GRUENEWALD, his wife. Finally, her death document
dated 1849 lists her as the widow of Isaac STRASS, and her name is
Johannetta GRUENEWALD! So far I have not been able to find the marriage
document for Isaac STRASS and Susanna/Johanetta BIELDECK/GRUENEWALD or find
previous information in regards to her roots in Neuhemsbach, where she was
born. Can anyone help me?

Karen Brown, California, karendesign@...


Re: Catholic Parish Records in Franconia as a Source of Jewish Genealogical Information #germany

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

Dear Nick,
I was equally surprised at a similar response when asking for data
about KUGELMANN >from Wagenfeld, where the city employee sent me to
the "Pfarramt der evangelisch-lutherischen Kirchengemeinde". I ended
up with extracts >from a compilation that had been produced by a young
historian (plainly Christian) during his national service. My
understanding is that records prior to 1874 are kept by the local church,
at least if there is no longer a Jewish community. Can anyone expand on this?

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium <nheymans@...>


German SIG #Germany Re: Catholic Parish Records in Franconia as a Source of Jewish Genealogical Information #germany

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

Dear Nick,
I was equally surprised at a similar response when asking for data
about KUGELMANN >from Wagenfeld, where the city employee sent me to
the "Pfarramt der evangelisch-lutherischen Kirchengemeinde". I ended
up with extracts >from a compilation that had been produced by a young
historian (plainly Christian) during his national service. My
understanding is that records prior to 1874 are kept by the local church,
at least if there is no longer a Jewish community. Can anyone expand on this?

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium <nheymans@...>


Surnames in Germany was Re: Inherited family names Re: Ludwig PFANTZLER, Born 1714 #germany

Nick Landau <N.Landau@...>
 

Pat Weinthal raises some questions in regard to the name adoptions in
Germany of the early 19th century. I guess, we have still much to learn.
Presumably, no standard pattern of name adoption existed. [snip]
I have found this article in German on the subject
http://www.rhaude.de/napoleon/namen/namensrecht.htm. It is published by the
municipality of Rhaude.

The article is specifically about Ostfriesland - East Friesland.

Nick Landau London, UK <N.Landau@...>


German SIG #Germany Surnames in Germany was Re: Inherited family names Re: Ludwig PFANTZLER, Born 1714 #germany

Nick Landau <N.Landau@...>
 

Pat Weinthal raises some questions in regard to the name adoptions in
Germany of the early 19th century. I guess, we have still much to learn.
Presumably, no standard pattern of name adoption existed. [snip]
I have found this article in German on the subject
http://www.rhaude.de/napoleon/namen/namensrecht.htm. It is published by the
municipality of Rhaude.

The article is specifically about Ostfriesland - East Friesland.

Nick Landau London, UK <N.Landau@...>


stable last names in Germany prior to legal requirements #germany

TamarDC <t.duke.cohan@...>
 

Hi,
I want to support Pat Weinthal's learned note about stable,
multi-generational names in German Jewish families well into
the 18th century. of the eight families I have researched, at
least three had such names well before the 19th century, one
as early as the beginning of the 18th. These families come
from Southern Germany's small villages and were poor and had
no rabbinic connections. The ESSINGER name was never changed
and some of my favorite cousins still carry it to this day! Thanks,

Tamar Duke-Cohan (Newton, MA) <t.duke.cohan@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: As stated by Mr. Buck today, the adoption of inherited family
names by Jews varied >from place to place. A comprehensive guide to such
adoptions would require "a very thick book". I will not approve an unending
stream of messages about name adoptions within various families. I hope that
the messages on this topic have established that the rule on this matter is:

There is no rule on this matter. John Lowens, MOD1


German SIG #Germany stable last names in Germany prior to legal requirements #germany

TamarDC <t.duke.cohan@...>
 

Hi,
I want to support Pat Weinthal's learned note about stable,
multi-generational names in German Jewish families well into
the 18th century. of the eight families I have researched, at
least three had such names well before the 19th century, one
as early as the beginning of the 18th. These families come
from Southern Germany's small villages and were poor and had
no rabbinic connections. The ESSINGER name was never changed
and some of my favorite cousins still carry it to this day! Thanks,

Tamar Duke-Cohan (Newton, MA) <t.duke.cohan@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: As stated by Mr. Buck today, the adoption of inherited family
names by Jews varied >from place to place. A comprehensive guide to such
adoptions would require "a very thick book". I will not approve an unending
stream of messages about name adoptions within various families. I hope that
the messages on this topic have established that the rule on this matter is:

There is no rule on this matter. John Lowens, MOD1


Surnames in Germany #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Since prior to 1871 there was no central, uniform legislation in Germany,
general historical questions and statements are not possible.

Texts about e.g. Schutzjuden status, Schutzgeld, name-giving can only be
written for specific territories or states within the German Reich. When talking
about the use of Jewish patronymics and family names one has to know these
particular laws and and how much liberty was left to the Jews. If this was
granted to a certain degree, we come to a further distinction: the Jews in the
smaller or greater cities and the rural Jewry or Landjudentum. All three
groups behaved in a different way concerning the change of the traditional
patronymic system.

*** If they had the free choice,*** the Jews *** in the cities *** turned to
family names sooner than the more conservative Landjuden. When a final date for
the adoption of family names was fixed, some families had already voluntarily
turned to the normal naming system.

All this means that R. Lustig's interesting questions can only be answered,
when the name of a specific state is added. To answer them for Germany as
whole would lead to a thick book.

Gerhard Buck - Idstein - Germany buckidstein@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr. Buck is the author of several books about Jewish communities
in Germany (usually in Hesse). He is also the author of a tremendously helpful
article in the current issue of "Stammbaum" - (N. 27)
"Genealogical Research for German Landjuden in Nassau - Part 1 - The Period
before the introduction of Vital Registers." (To be concluded in N.28)

As he says above, there is no universal truth regarding the adoption of inherited
family names by Jews in the region that became modern Germany. Mr. Buck is
an expert on the records of the Nassau region of Hesse. His comments, therefore,
can be considered authoritative with regard to that region. MOD 1


German SIG #Germany Surnames in Germany #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Since prior to 1871 there was no central, uniform legislation in Germany,
general historical questions and statements are not possible.

Texts about e.g. Schutzjuden status, Schutzgeld, name-giving can only be
written for specific territories or states within the German Reich. When talking
about the use of Jewish patronymics and family names one has to know these
particular laws and and how much liberty was left to the Jews. If this was
granted to a certain degree, we come to a further distinction: the Jews in the
smaller or greater cities and the rural Jewry or Landjudentum. All three
groups behaved in a different way concerning the change of the traditional
patronymic system.

*** If they had the free choice,*** the Jews *** in the cities *** turned to
family names sooner than the more conservative Landjuden. When a final date for
the adoption of family names was fixed, some families had already voluntarily
turned to the normal naming system.

All this means that R. Lustig's interesting questions can only be answered,
when the name of a specific state is added. To answer them for Germany as
whole would lead to a thick book.

Gerhard Buck - Idstein - Germany buckidstein@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr. Buck is the author of several books about Jewish communities
in Germany (usually in Hesse). He is also the author of a tremendously helpful
article in the current issue of "Stammbaum" - (N. 27)
"Genealogical Research for German Landjuden in Nassau - Part 1 - The Period
before the introduction of Vital Registers." (To be concluded in N.28)

As he says above, there is no universal truth regarding the adoption of inherited
family names by Jews in the region that became modern Germany. Mr. Buck is
an expert on the records of the Nassau region of Hesse. His comments, therefore,
can be considered authoritative with regard to that region. MOD 1