Date   

Lodz area maps and towns #lodz #poland

flamholtz@...
 

Tom,

You asked for a list of towns. The best and easiest
resource to use is the map and town list found at the LARG
(Lodz Area Group Research) site:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lodz/LARG.htm

Good luck,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Lawrenceville, GA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Lodz area maps and towns #lodz #poland

flamholtz@...
 

Tom,

You asked for a list of towns. The best and easiest
resource to use is the map and town list found at the LARG
(Lodz Area Group Research) site:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lodz/LARG.htm

Good luck,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Lawrenceville, GA


FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

Everything in Hungary was filmed up to Oct 1 1895, the point at which
civil registration was started.This project was done in 1965 at the
National Archives in Budapest.(In recent years there is a new project on
the way where civil records, i.e. post 1895 are being filmed and some are
available on microfilm--it would be interesting to find out in what
order/ context is this being done).

The way the old records were divided between the new countries after the
war was that the country where the District/Jaras seat resided got the
records for the entire district, even if some of the villages were not
there. Example: Kiraly Helmec was the district seat for Bodrog district
and after the war it became Slovakia. All the district records including
Cigand, Rozvagy, Karad etc which are in Hungary went along and were
excluded >from the 1965 project, thus do not appear on the FHL films.

However, interestingly enough the regional archives in Ujhely do have the
records!

Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Austro-Hungarian Army records #hungary

Danielle James <daniandw@...>
 

Dear Members,

I have just come across this site - it carries some excellent
information, including short biographies. Many of the names are
Jewish. Importantly, it also has excellent links.

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/index.htm

I hope it proves helpful to some.

Regards

Danielle James
South Australia
daniandw@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Austro-Hungarian Army records #hungary

Danielle James <daniandw@...>
 

Dear Members,

I have just come across this site - it carries some excellent
information, including short biographies. Many of the names are
Jewish. Importantly, it also has excellent links.

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/index.htm

I hope it proves helpful to some.

Regards

Danielle James
South Australia
daniandw@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY #hungary

alex p miller <alex.miller@...>
 

Everything in Hungary was filmed up to Oct 1 1895, the point at which
civil registration was started.This project was done in 1965 at the
National Archives in Budapest.(In recent years there is a new project on
the way where civil records, i.e. post 1895 are being filmed and some are
available on microfilm--it would be interesting to find out in what
order/ context is this being done).

The way the old records were divided between the new countries after the
war was that the country where the District/Jaras seat resided got the
records for the entire district, even if some of the villages were not
there. Example: Kiraly Helmec was the district seat for Bodrog district
and after the war it became Slovakia. All the district records including
Cigand, Rozvagy, Karad etc which are in Hungary went along and were
excluded >from the 1965 project, thus do not appear on the FHL films.

However, interestingly enough the regional archives in Ujhely do have the
records!

Best Regards,

Alex Miller, Chester CO. PA
alex.miller@ juno.com


Re: Satoraljaujhely (h-sig digest: August 21, 2005) #hungary

Michael Miller <mmillermrpjd@...>
 

It appears that Andres is not aware of the Satoraljaujhely records >from
1827-1895 contained in FHL microfilms #642954-642957. I don't know if these
are ALL Orthodox, but some clearly are and they are available >from Salt Lake
City on loan to any Family History Center. I have examined some.

Michael W. Miller
Napa, California

----Original Message Follows----

Subject: Re: FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY
From: Andres Carciente <andrescarciente@...>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2005 05:08:39 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

As I wrote in one of my postings about
SATORALJAUJHELY,I found in the city archive the Jewish
Orthodox Records which were not at all microfilmed by
the mormons!!!

Andres Carciente
Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Satoraljaujhely (h-sig digest: August 21, 2005) #hungary

Michael Miller <mmillermrpjd@...>
 

It appears that Andres is not aware of the Satoraljaujhely records >from
1827-1895 contained in FHL microfilms #642954-642957. I don't know if these
are ALL Orthodox, but some clearly are and they are available >from Salt Lake
City on loan to any Family History Center. I have examined some.

Michael W. Miller
Napa, California

----Original Message Follows----

Subject: Re: FHL JEWISH RECORDS FOR HUNGARY
From: Andres Carciente <andrescarciente@...>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2005 05:08:39 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

As I wrote in one of my postings about
SATORALJAUJHELY,I found in the city archive the Jewish
Orthodox Records which were not at all microfilmed by
the mormons!!!

Andres Carciente
Budapest


Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Jules Levin
 

At 02:16 AM 8/24/2005, you wrote:

I will try to answer the question inquired by Sam
Schleman concerning a possibility to learn Cyrillic in
order to read records written in Russian. I think
there is no problem for English speaker to learn
Cyrillic alphabet, many letters are similar. The
problem is to *decipher* old Russian handwriting that
had slightly different >from the modern Russian
orthography and unintelligible script. Russian is my
mother tongue and I am working with nineteenth century
documents for ten years; sometimes I have difficulties
to decipher some words.
Irene Kudish
Tel-Aviv
In general I agree with Irene Kudish. I am not a native speaker, but I
began studying Russian at 18, and I am
now 65. I taught it, even advanced levels, for over 30 years. The
handwriting is the biggest challenge. Once deciphered
the translation is very simple. In fact I wrote to JewishGen a few months
ago regarding the costs of translating records
by hiring people in Russia. I said that if they hired people, even not
knowing English, to simply *transcribe* documents
into some readable computer text, I would be happy to translate as a
volunteer. In fact, having written a textbook for reading Russian, I think
that if the documents were available in such a readable form, I could write
a little guide to Russian just for people
trying to read these documents. After all, most of the language is
repeated in every document.
The documents I have seen do not strike me as sloppily written. Rather,
they seem to be written in stylized clerical hands.
The problem is, every writer seems to have his own style. They are
internally consistent, some are even quite beautiful, but it can take hours
to puzzle out the handwriting style used in a given document. The easiest
writing I deciphered was scrawled on the back of a postcard! Proving that
a little knowledge (of "official" handwriting) is a dangerous thing.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


1911 Canadian Census #general

Mervin
 

I want to express my gratitude to all who have responded to my posting for
help. You have been most helpful. I see that I have a great deal of work
ahead of me but at least I am pointed in the right direction.
Merv Glow
Palm Springs
mglow@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Jules Levin
 

At 02:16 AM 8/24/2005, you wrote:

I will try to answer the question inquired by Sam
Schleman concerning a possibility to learn Cyrillic in
order to read records written in Russian. I think
there is no problem for English speaker to learn
Cyrillic alphabet, many letters are similar. The
problem is to *decipher* old Russian handwriting that
had slightly different >from the modern Russian
orthography and unintelligible script. Russian is my
mother tongue and I am working with nineteenth century
documents for ten years; sometimes I have difficulties
to decipher some words.
Irene Kudish
Tel-Aviv
In general I agree with Irene Kudish. I am not a native speaker, but I
began studying Russian at 18, and I am
now 65. I taught it, even advanced levels, for over 30 years. The
handwriting is the biggest challenge. Once deciphered
the translation is very simple. In fact I wrote to JewishGen a few months
ago regarding the costs of translating records
by hiring people in Russia. I said that if they hired people, even not
knowing English, to simply *transcribe* documents
into some readable computer text, I would be happy to translate as a
volunteer. In fact, having written a textbook for reading Russian, I think
that if the documents were available in such a readable form, I could write
a little guide to Russian just for people
trying to read these documents. After all, most of the language is
repeated in every document.
The documents I have seen do not strike me as sloppily written. Rather,
they seem to be written in stylized clerical hands.
The problem is, every writer seems to have his own style. They are
internally consistent, some are even quite beautiful, but it can take hours
to puzzle out the handwriting style used in a given document. The easiest
writing I deciphered was scrawled on the back of a postcard! Proving that
a little knowledge (of "official" handwriting) is a dangerous thing.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1911 Canadian Census #general

Mervin
 

I want to express my gratitude to all who have responded to my posting for
help. You have been most helpful. I see that I have a great deal of work
ahead of me but at least I am pointed in the right direction.
Merv Glow
Palm Springs
mglow@...


Registering side-branches of family trees on the JGFF #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am responding to Nick Landau's point: Some personal
"successes" was Re: Seeking: PERELES, DUB and
TAUSSIG: "Further to Celia Male's posting, my mother's
maiden name ATLAS is not such a common Jewish name but
clearly is an ordinary English word, which also is
used in other languages, I believe. In the last 8
months I have been in contact with a probable cousin
from the States. We made contact through JGFF and he
had no knowledge of our branch of the family..."

But Nick, I have 5,000 plus on my tree - there is no
way I would register all the names - I am not really
looking for PERELES, HIRSCH, DUB, TAUSSIG etc as I
have constructed the tree which grows daily, visited
the graves in Vienna, done the research and I know
where many of the descendants are. Only a few are
actually related to me. They are side-branches going
way back to the early 1800s and in some cases, one or
two of their descendants married into my immediate
family.

There are few people who *do* side-branches on trees,
like I do. Randy Schoenberg, one of the founders of
the Austria-Czech group, an avid genealogist since his
childhood, said to me that I was the keenest
genealogist he knew because of my "side-branches". How
far does one branch? I was unaware of this
idiosyncracy of mine, thinking that is what everyone
did, as I just went sideways whenever I found a
confirmed link.

I am delighted to meet anyone on the tree and help
them but as far registering all my side-branches [not
relatives!] on the JGFF, I would never have any other
life. However, when I see a link >from a correspondent,
I always reply and branch even further. I am always on
the look out for links - I find them fascinating.

In this case, the only person I have not heard >from is
the original enquirer re HIRSCH, PERELES, DUB and
TAUSSIG - named Peter Rath >from Austria, which is
ironic! He presumably has another sideways link to
these families which I am unaware of and I am, as
always, excited to hear about.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Registering side-branches of family trees on the JGFF #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am responding to Nick Landau's point: Some personal
"successes" was Re: Seeking: PERELES, DUB and
TAUSSIG: "Further to Celia Male's posting, my mother's
maiden name ATLAS is not such a common Jewish name but
clearly is an ordinary English word, which also is
used in other languages, I believe. In the last 8
months I have been in contact with a probable cousin
from the States. We made contact through JGFF and he
had no knowledge of our branch of the family..."

But Nick, I have 5,000 plus on my tree - there is no
way I would register all the names - I am not really
looking for PERELES, HIRSCH, DUB, TAUSSIG etc as I
have constructed the tree which grows daily, visited
the graves in Vienna, done the research and I know
where many of the descendants are. Only a few are
actually related to me. They are side-branches going
way back to the early 1800s and in some cases, one or
two of their descendants married into my immediate
family.

There are few people who *do* side-branches on trees,
like I do. Randy Schoenberg, one of the founders of
the Austria-Czech group, an avid genealogist since his
childhood, said to me that I was the keenest
genealogist he knew because of my "side-branches". How
far does one branch? I was unaware of this
idiosyncracy of mine, thinking that is what everyone
did, as I just went sideways whenever I found a
confirmed link.

I am delighted to meet anyone on the tree and help
them but as far registering all my side-branches [not
relatives!] on the JGFF, I would never have any other
life. However, when I see a link >from a correspondent,
I always reply and branch even further. I am always on
the look out for links - I find them fascinating.

In this case, the only person I have not heard >from is
the original enquirer re HIRSCH, PERELES, DUB and
TAUSSIG - named Peter Rath >from Austria, which is
ironic! He presumably has another sideways link to
these families which I am unaware of and I am, as
always, excited to hear about.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Re: MOSES family #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Lawrence Blum wrote on 23 aug 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

While researching my maternal grandfather, Joseph FARBMAN, I found him
in the 1901 Census in London. The address is No. 56 Royal Mint St.,
WhiteChapel He is signed in as Joe FARBMAN, age 22 born in Russia
living with cousin.
His brother Morris FARBMAN, age 28 , born in Russia, living with
cousin is also listed.
The cousin and family record follows:
Nathan MOSES is head of family, age 42 , born in Russia
The wife is Rebecca, age 37, also born in Russia
The children are in order: Fannie 19, Jennie 17, Meyer 11, Louis 8,
Victor 6, all were born in WhiteChapel.
Is any researcher familiar with this MOSES family? This branch of my
grandfather's family is a
complete mystery.
In 1871 another MOSES lived there. Mixup possible?

<http://genforum.genealogy.com/englandcountry/middlesex/messages/1355.html>

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: MOSES family #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Lawrence Blum wrote on 23 aug 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

While researching my maternal grandfather, Joseph FARBMAN, I found him
in the 1901 Census in London. The address is No. 56 Royal Mint St.,
WhiteChapel He is signed in as Joe FARBMAN, age 22 born in Russia
living with cousin.
His brother Morris FARBMAN, age 28 , born in Russia, living with
cousin is also listed.
The cousin and family record follows:
Nathan MOSES is head of family, age 42 , born in Russia
The wife is Rebecca, age 37, also born in Russia
The children are in order: Fannie 19, Jennie 17, Meyer 11, Louis 8,
Victor 6, all were born in WhiteChapel.
Is any researcher familiar with this MOSES family? This branch of my
grandfather's family is a
complete mystery.
In 1871 another MOSES lived there. Mixup possible?

<http://genforum.genealogy.com/englandcountry/middlesex/messages/1355.html>

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


Publishing family trees #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

Since I was not able to follow the discussion regarding family trees, I'd
like to ask: Is there some official/legal/and/or ethical limits on
publishing a family tree without the consent of all the members of the
family? What is considered "publishing"? Are their details regarding family
members which can be published without permission but others (addresses,
phones etc) which should/may not be published?

Sorry, if these questions were anwered but do to my work load and events
going on in Israel I was not able to read carefully all the e-mails.
Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Publishing family trees #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

Since I was not able to follow the discussion regarding family trees, I'd
like to ask: Is there some official/legal/and/or ethical limits on
publishing a family tree without the consent of all the members of the
family? What is considered "publishing"? Are their details regarding family
members which can be published without permission but others (addresses,
phones etc) which should/may not be published?

Sorry, if these questions were anwered but do to my work load and events
going on in Israel I was not able to read carefully all the e-mails.
Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Romania SIG #Romania List of jewish soldiers, Romanian army, dead in WWI #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

Hi,

Is anyone aware if there is a compiled list of jewish soldiers that have
fallen in the Romanian army during WWI ? If so, where could it be found
? Any historians that may be approached with this question?

Thanks,
Sorin Goldenberg,
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign messages with your location.

*


Re: Publishing genealogies #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<yisraelasper@...> wrote

I have relatives who are by now very distant in relationship and don't
need a genealogist to tell them they are related. All they have to do
is look at a wedding invitation. They would be insulted to be kicked
out of a tree or a wedding invitation.
I have a family-tree going back to 1650 and I was shown the cemeteries in
Furth by Gisela Blume (for which much thanks).

I had not heard of her previously and she handed me family-trees which were
all connected to this family.

The name Rapaport appears in the family-tree and I have established quite a
few years ago a connection with a number of people who post on this
newsgroup.

The mathematics of this is not very difficult and either you are related to
yourself a number of times, or you must be related to half the Jews in New
York.

I have read that the number of Ashkenazi Jews at the time of Rashi was only
about 50,000.

We know that at succeeding generations with the family cycle of weddings
individuals form their own families and once fairly close relations become
more distant - their is only so many people you can invite to weddings and
there is the factor of geography.

In statistics I use degrees of connectedness and likewise we do so in our
family relations - third, fourth cousins etc.

We naturally recognise that someone who shares a greatgreatgreatfather is
not as closely related as a first cousin.

Having said that we probably know of families where they have regular
meetings of all descendants of such and such a family that came >from X. This
is more like the Scottish clan.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland)
ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)