Date   

Searching for family of Marianne FRANKEL nee NISSEL - born Vienna 1923 #israel #austria-czech

George Fogelson
 

Searching for the family of Marianne FRANKEL nee NISSEL who was born 1923 in Vienna. Her parents were Emil Nissel and Ella nee Bass. She resided in Vienna until July 1938 and arrived in Haifa in 1940. She married Heinz Frankel and resided in Tel Aviv. I am friends with a Holocaust survivor from Vienna who now resides in Los Angeles and has photos of the Nissel family he would like to share with Marianne FRANKEL's family.
 
You can message me at fogelson@...
 
George FOGELSON
Redondo Beach, CA
 


ViewMate translation request - German #translation

Nurit Har-zvi
 

I've posted the back of a photo  for which I need a translation from what I'm pretty sure is German. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Nurit Har-zvi


ViewMate translation request - Hebrew #translation

Nurit Har-zvi
 

I've posted the backs of some photos for which I need  translations from Hebrew. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses...
Nurit Har-zvi


Re: Reading manifest of Leiser Fiksler and deposit in emigrant bank by brother #records

Mark Halpern
 

Hi Marilyn:

I will only be responding to your inquiry on the attached Philadelphia Bank Immigrant Passenger Record.

The document you found on Ancestry was shared by our host JewishGen. Once you see that, it is best to close Ancestry and open the JewishGen USA database. First, you should read the backgrounder on The Rosenbaum Bank Passage Order Book Records Database at https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm. This database was indexed by the Jewish Genealogical and Archival Society of Greater Philadelphia and donated to JewishGen. 

Now, search the USA database in Pennsylvania for FIKSLER. Here is the result for Rosenbaum

Rosenbaum Bank Passage Order Book Records


Searching for Surname (phonetically like) : FIKSLER
4 matching records found.
Run on Sun, 11 Sep 2022 14:56:58 -0600

Passenger Name Purchaser Name Date
(MM/DD/CCYY)
FIKSLER, Schimen  LECHTMAN, Joe  12/6/1905 
FIKSLER, Leiser  FIKSLER, Nathan  8/1/1906 
FIKSLER, Golde  FIKSLER, Max  3/29/1910 
FIKSLER, Berl  FIKSLER, Max  3/29/1910 

There will also be results for Blitzstein and Lipshutz Banks and you should follow up on them. 

The actual records are held by Temple University Library Special Collections https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/custom/rosenbaum. You have to find the ledger number that relates to the date of passage (8/1/1906). Then click on Browse Ledgers. Then find Volume 17. Then find the "F" index. Then find your man on page 242 and then find the actual image, which is not on page 242, but is image 270 of 302. The information in this ledger will astound you.

Good luck on your search.

Mark Halpern
Conshohocken, PA
VP, Jewish Genealogical and Archival Society of Greater Philadelphia
  

On 2022-09-11 12:05 pm, Marilyn Levinson via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:

Hello researchers
I am trying to decipher the entries for Leiser Fiksler on the passenger manifest line 12.  I am attaching the arriving passenger document, but believe the manifest itself needs to be seen on a computer. Could anyone attempt to decipher his occupation, what is the first name of the Fiksler brother he is going to meet, and there seems to be a note "not at home."  Also who was Leiser leaving behind in Chotin?
Finally, it seems that on Leiser Fiksler's line on the passenger manifest it states he was either met at the landing station, sent home by steamship company, or passed by special board of inquiry.  Can any one tell me which category seems to be on Leiser's manifest line?
I have also attached a document for the Philadelphia Bank Immigrant Passenger Records.  Would Nathan Fiksler, the brother have deposited the money in the Philadelphia Bank account and then the money or perhaps the tickets themselves would be delivered to Leiser Fiksler in Chotin?I deeply appreciate your help.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


JewishGen Weekly News Nosh September 11, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates

Phil Goldfarb
 


The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor
September 11, 2022

The question of the week last week was “Why am I receiving two Weekly News Noshes?” The answer is that you are subscribed to both the JewishGen Discussion Group (JGDG) as well as to JewishGen.org. Some individuals are subscribed to one or to the other, and many are subscribed to both. These are separate mailing lists. I mail the News Nosh to the JGDG on Sunday, and it is mailed by JewishGen.org on Monday to their e-mail list. Unfortunately, at this time there is not a way to integrate the two. Also, with the JGDG, all posts are archived for future reference (have you checked out the JGDG archives of over 671,000+ messages dating back to 1998 for any genealogy help?) while e-mails coming out from JewishGen.org are not. Depending upon how you receive your JGDG, you will also see it included in the Daily Summary or the Full Featured Digest. The simple solution for now? Just hit the delete button as the content is the same!

Enjoy this week’s Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@...

 

  1. MyHeritage Accelerates Publication of Content, Adds 74 Collections with 130 Million Historical Records. The 130 million records are of many different types including birth, marriage, death, census, immigration, civil, military, newspapers, will and probate records. The new records come from many countries: the U.S., the U.K, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Scotland, and Spain. Following this update, the total number of collections on MyHeritage has now climbed to 18.6 billion records. Read more in their blog: MyHeritage Accelerates Publication of Content, Adds 74 Collections with 130 Million Historical Records - MyHeritage Blog

 

  1. Another One Million Newspaper Pages Made Free by the British Newspaper Archive and the British Library. Together, the British Newspaper Archive and the British Library are committed to releasing a total of five million free pages over five years, which can be accessed online on the British Newspaper Archive website and on Findmypast. Read the full story from Dick Eastman’s EOGN:  https://eogn.com/page-18080/12907127

 

  1. Information for Jewish Genealogy Societies or anyone to use in starting a Jewish Genealogy library. Thanks to Michelle Sandler MLS, the Head of Libraries for the IAJGS and working with most of the experts in the Jewish Genealogy field, Michelle has compiled a list of critical books and steps needed, Library of Congress headings and classification numbers, as well as other information for help in starting a Jewish Genealogy Library. She also attached her 2022 IAJGS Presentation on the subject. To view go to: https://www.ocjgs.org/for-librarians.html  

 

  1. 5 Million Photos of Graves Now Available at Geneanet. Geneanet (based in France) has reached a milestone of 5 million photos of graves are now online. Many of these photos are taken in Europe although a few are from North America. The Geneanet approach is comparable to, but different from Find-a-Grave and others. At Geneanet, there is always at least one actual photo of a grave or monument in the database, so no copied lists, funeral home announcement scrapings, or blank entries. No one "owns" a grave record at Geneanet; gravestones are available for indexing by everyone, not just the photographer. Thanks to Dick Eastman and EOGN for this story: https://www.eogn.com/page-18080/12912397 Also, check out their “Save Our Graves Project” that you can participate in: Join the project "Save our Graves" - Geneanet

 

  1. Nowy Sącz Memorial Lists 12000 Jewish Names Nazis Deported to their Deaths; And Returned Cobblestones in Prague. A new memorial lists the names of 12,000 Jews from Nowy Sącz and its surroundings deported by the Germans to their deaths during the Holocaust. The Prague memorial constructed from hundreds of cobblestones that were cut from uprooted Jewish gravestones and used for paving in downtown Prague has also been dedicated at the Old Jewish Cemetery in Prague’s Žižkov district. Go to https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2022/09/11/poland-cz-memorials/ for the stories and to see the video. Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.

 

  1. Polish Genealogical Society of America 2022 Virtual Conference- Sept 16 – 18. To read more and register go to: https://pgsa.org/product/2022-pgsa-virtual-conference/

 

  1. 17th-century Jewish woman’s diaries to be adapted into new graphic novel.  Glikl of Hamlyn's diary, written hundreds of years ago, describes issues, ambitions and struggles that remain relevant today. The Jewish woman whose 20-year diary describes life in medieval eastern Europe is being turned into a graphic novel by a husband-and-wife team of educators. Born in approximately 1646, she lived mostly in Hamburg, in today’s Germany. She is usually referred to as Glikl of Hamlyn, her husband’s hometown, which is also spelled Hamelin, famous for the story of the Pied Piper. Glikl lived well into her 80s and had 14 children, 12 of whom lived into adulthood. Read the story from the Jerusalem Post: 17th-century Jewish woman’s diaries to be adapted into new graphic novel - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Revitalizing part of a small town’s Jewish History… Las Vegas, New Mexico. Nearly 700 miles east of the glitz and casinos of the Las Vegas strip lies another town with the same name: Las Vegas, New Mexico. It once boasted a large Jewish community and, in 1886, the Temple Montefiore opened its doors as the first Jewish place of worship in New Mexico Territory. The Jews of Las Vegas now have an opportunity to buy back the building and reclaim a vital part of their history. Read the interesting story: Las Vegas, N.M. Jewish community aims to buy back synagogue - Albuquerque Journal (abqjournal.com)  Thanks to JGDG member Mary Kinney for passing this story along to me.

 

  1. A labor of love: Meet the Rabbi who spent seven years translating the entire Chumash for Romania’s Jewish community…even though he moved away. Although there are several Romanian translations of the Hebrew Bible, this will be the first from a Jewish lens. “Tora si Haftarot,” which is both translated and transliterated into Romanian, was unveiled at a ceremony at Bucharest’s Choral Temple meant to celebrate both the book itself and the seven-year effort to bring it into the world. Read the story from JTA: This Romanian rabbi spent 7 years translating the Torah into Romanian — even though he moved away - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. Jamaica, Jews and Christopher Columbus: The Fascinating History of Jews in Jamaica.  Jamaica! Reggae music, Bob Marley, beaches, palm trees, Usain Bolt and… Jews. Jews!? Surprisingly, the Jewish connection to Jamaica is very old and very interesting. The first synagogue in Jamaica was built in the latter half of the 17th century, but was destroyed by an earthquake in 1692. Synagogues in Jamaica and the West Indies have a very unique feature: wooden floors covered with sand. .Read the full story from Aish: Jamaica, Jews and Christopher Columbus: The Fascinating History of Jews in Jamaica - aish.com

 

  1. He preserved Ukrainian Jewish culture — before, during and after the Shoah. In the late 1920s, ethnomusicologist Moyshe Beregovsky began traveling to Ukrainian Jewish villages equipped with a phonograph and wax cylinders. He was out to record wedding songs, klezmer anthems and lullabies. He couldn’t have known it at the time, but what he ended up documenting was a culture on the cusp of oblivion — and one that, against all odds, would continue a tradition of song. Read the story from the Forward: He preserved Ukrainian Jewish culture — before, during and after the Shoah – The Forward.

 

  1. Rare First Temple period ivories discovered in Jerusalem. Also found was a seal impression, some 2,700 years old, reading, “Natan-Melech servant of the king.” Archaeologists are describing as “extraordinary” the discovery of a collection of ivory plaques from the First Temple period recently unearthed in Jerusalem. They are among only a few ever found and the first to be unearthed in the city. Read the story from JNS: Rare First Temple period ivories discovered in Jerusalem - JNS.org

 

  1. Ancient Hebrew letter from First Temple period returned to Israel. The letter written in ancient Hebrew, originally found in the Judean Desert caves, ended up in Montana and was then returned to Israel. Archaeologists estimated that it dates back to the sixth century BCE which joins two other documents in this time period in the Israel Antiquities Authority Dead Sea Scrolls collection. Read the story from The Jerusalem Post: Ancient Hebrew letter from First Temple period returned to Israel - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Saving the World's Synagogues from Destruction. The London-based Foundation for Jewish Heritage, exists to preserve Jewish architectural sites, monuments and places of cultural significance at risk worldwide. The Foundation, which started in 2015 has created an inventory of over 3,300 historic Jewish sites, many in urgent need of restoration. To read more see: https://www.brandeis.edu/jewish-experience/alumni-friends/2022/august/temples-preservation-history.html Thanks to Dick Eastman and EOGN for this story.

 

  1. This Holocaust survivor and Brazilian swimming champion is still competing at 98. Last month, at the Pan American Games in Medellin, Colombia, spectators, journalists and the event’s organizers lined up with anticipation along the side of a pool to watch a 400-meter medley. They were there to see Nora Tausz Ronai, who would finish the race — which involves breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and freestyle — despite the fact that she is 98 years old. Read the inspiring story from JTA: This Holocaust survivor and Brazilian swimming champion is still competing at 98 - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. At Bergen-Belsen, an activist born in DP camp commemorates loss and life. One might not associate the term “concentration camp” with life. But that is exactly how Menachem Rosensaft views Bergen-Belsen. For it was here, in the displaced persons camp set up after World War II, that the longtime activist for Holocaust remembrance was born.  Read the story from JTA:  At Bergen-Belsen, an activist born in DP camp commemorates loss and life - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

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Advice on finding marriage record Zhitomir area, mid 19th century #records #ukraine

Philip Rosinsky
 

Hello- I need some expert advice…
My ancestor Ovsey Heshel TOIBENSHTEIN was born 1822 in (I believe- based on census records) Zhitomir. He had a first wife and six kids that all died within 2-3 days in October 1865 - (based on death index records… no actual record exists and I don’t know how they all died so close to each other).
He married Pessie PERELMAN and started having children with her about 1867-8.
My problem is that I can’t find their marriage record or even indexed record in Zhitomir during the relevant years…
Any suggestions? Any idea what neighbouring towns might be worth searching in?
Thanks in advance,
Philip Rosinsky, Israel
prosinsky@...


Re: Yizkor Book of Plotzk/Plock (Poland) #yizkorbooks

Mike Coleman
 

The insight provided by Irene - for which very many thanks - is disappointing and something I hadn't considered.

It however ties in with what had intrigued me from the outset, that pages 25 through 27 of the book together cover six separate "articles" including (page 25) that of interest to me.

So I guess that's the end of the story.

Thanks to all who took the trouble to answer.

 

Mike Coleman   London U.K.

 

Researching : Arbeiter/Arbajter and Malenka/Malenki in Plotzk/Plock and Wyszogrod

 

 

 

 

 


Andrychow notary records indexing #poland

Max Heffler
 

Stanley Diamond has alerted me to this article and the notary records that exist for Andrychow in Wadowice County in Poland, near Krakow, If you are researching Andrychow, please consider contributing to the indexing of these notary records. Thanks:

 

As this article rightly points out, there is a "A Potentially Powerful Alternative to Vital Records"

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vTyrpMXL0XI5C5Yow7kP4BY487yow2u8Sv0SWi6Byx9IG31WC1Jqcqk0i9jARZvrpLRqdlsaxATawdJ/pub

 

We just need the funds to scan the index volumes for these records.

 

1917

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Kazimierza Bąka w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/804/0

1873, 1879-1896

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Marcina Gayczaka w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/805/0

1901-1914

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Franciszka Horaka w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/806/0

1899-1900

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Marcina Groyeckiego w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/807/0

1916-1917

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Franciszka Gutwińskiego zastępcy notariusza w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/808/0

1921

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Juliana Janickiego w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/809/0

1926

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Stefana Klimczyka zastępcy notariusza w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/810/0

1920

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Władysława Mynarskiego zastępcy notariusza w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/811/0

1900-1901

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Piotra Pieli w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/812/0

1927-1937

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Stefana Breyera w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/1275/0

1934-1939

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Aleksandra Gertsmana w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/1410/0

1946-1947

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Kazimierza Piątkiewicza w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/1413/0

1946

Notarial

Akta Notariusza Władysława Starzałkowskiego w Andrychowie

PSA - 013 - Bielsko-Biala

13/1414/0

 

 

Max Heffler, JRI-Poland town leader for Andrychow

Houston, TX


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


(Poland, Czech Republic ) Nowy Sącz Memorial Lists 12000 Jewish Names Nazis Deported to their Deaths; Returned Cobblestones in Prague #announcements #austria-czech #holocaust #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Jewish Heritage Europe has an article on two significant new Holocaust Memorials: Names in Nowy Sącz and Returned (Cobble)stones in Prague.

 

NOWY SĄCZ, POLAND

A new memorial lists the names of 12,000 Jews from Nowy Sącz and its surroundings  deported by the Germans to their deaths  during the Holocaust. The dedication ceremony took place on the 80th anniversary of the last deportation of Jews to the death camp at Bełżec and was the culmination of a week of memorial events.  During the memorial service the names of the 12,000 victims were read aloud—Jews who were enclosed in the WW2 Nowy Sacz ghetto and who came from Nowy Sącz, as well as from Stary Sącz, Łabowa, Piwniczna Zdrój, Krynica Zdrój, Grybów, Limanowa, Łącko, Tarnów, Krakow Łódź, Leipzig (Germany), Sieradz and other places.

 

There is a video- audio is in Polish –that may be seen/heard on the website:

https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2022/09/11/poland-cz-memorials/

 

The memorial is a sunken area on whose walls the names are inscribed in long columns. The memorial is a project of People not numbers, a project headed by the Polish Olympic athlete Dariusz Popiela that seeks to restore Jewish cemeteries and to create memorials that list by one  the names of victims of the Holocaust.

 

PRAGUE: RETURNED (COBBLE)STONES MEMORIAL, September  7

The memorial constructed from hundreds of cobblestones that were cut from uprooted Jewish gravestones and used for paving in downtown Prague has been dedicated at the Old Jewish Cemetery in Prague’s Žižkov district. (Not the famous Old Jewish Cemetery in the former ghetto area.)

 

 Return of the Stones monument, designed  the sculptor Jaroslav Róna and his wife Lucie, is centered on a low, circular mound made of 200 of the cobblestones showing remnants of Hebrew and Czech inscriptions, highlighted in gold. Low walls of unequal height, also made from the cobbles, branch out from this “like rays of the sun.”  the cobbles had been used to construct the pedestrian promenade along Na Příkopě street, at one end of Wenceslas Square, in the 1980s.  The fact that matzevot were used for the cobblestones became known after the fall of the communist regime in 1989.

 

A memorandum  signed between the city and the Jewish community mandated that the cobbles be removed and taken to the Zizkov cemetery.

 

Photos may be seen at: https://prazsky.denik.cz/zpravy_region/nahrobky-ktere-skoncily-v-dlazbe-se-promenily-v-pamatnik-20220907.html

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Please translate the Hebrew into English. #translation

Sandy Kaplan Schepis
 

Hello!
 
Kindly note the gravestone photo below. Fingers crossed that Ida was my grand uncle's wife. Thanks in advance for everyone's help!
 
image.png
Regards,
 
Sandy Kaplan Schepis

Moderator note: please respond privately. If you do not know how to reply directly to an individual, please see:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W1tIJXY80vSMUUCbifHcUFa9ao3o8MzZ7kHAGbY_qE8/edit?usp=sharing

 

. If you do not know how to reply directly to an individual, please see:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W1tIJXY80vSMUUCbifHcUFa9ao3o8MzZ7kHAGbY_qE8/edit?usp=sharing

 


Re: Yizkor Book of Plotzk/Plock (Poland) #yizkorbooks

ireneplotzker@...
 

Hi Mike,
It may be that the original article you are looking for no longer exists.  
From the JewishGen site:  "The first part of a book, written in Yiddish, by Yeshaya Trunk M. A. on the history of the Jews of Plotzk was published by it in January 1939. This publication was, unfortunately, lost during the war years and only a few copies remained extant. Its contents form the basis of the article, of which the following is a summary in English." 
This is followed by many short items for about 80 pages in English that describe other documents but don't actually include those documents, nor are they referring to articles elsewhere in the book.  For example, f
or the article you are interested in: 

The Minute-Book of the Tailors’ Union

by Dr. Emanuel Ringelblum


This article analyzes and describes the rules and regulations of the Tailors' Union of Plotzk. 

No article follows, and I see no title through the rest of the Teble of Contents that matches it.

Another example:  

Reb Moshe Ben Israel Wasserzug

by E. E.

The above – according to his memoirs – served at the end of the 18th century as a "go-between" of the Jewish community in Plotzk in its relations with the authorities, and as ritual slaughterer ("Shohet"). ....

Its owner and manager, Moshe Wasserzug, distinguished himself by his great ability. When the inn was partly destroyed by fire in 1807, he rebuilt it. "In a short time I succeeded", he writes, "to build it all again, including stables for 70 horses and sheds for the carts…" ... Heinrich Loewe, the publisher of these memoirs, states that they contain authentic facts throwing light on the daily life of Polish Jews at the end of the 18th century.

And there are dozens of similars cases of wording that are just summaries of texts that apparently are not in hand and may no longer exist.

Irene G. Plotzker, Wilmington, Delaware USA


Re: Can You Translate? #translation

Rosanne N Prichason
 

I tried researching Pauline's info in Ohio. Nothing. I also tried in New York. She lived in Ohio, so is that she would have filed?

Her history is rather interesting as to husbands. She was married but there isn't any record  of divorce or his death. There is a record of her living with the second one several years before their marriage. It is possible!!! :)

Rosanne Prichason
Lewes, Delaware


translation needed for line of document #translation

Judy Cooperman
 

Hi. I would appreciate help translating the following document, Line 708, Rella ROTH. The subject is from Munkacs and the translation can be from Subcarpathia, Ukraine, Czechoslovakia or Hungary.
Thank you very much.
Judy Cooperman
jbcoop30@...
New York


Bob Silverstein
 

Does anyone know anything about the Fridzon's from Pinsk and who settled in Cuba?
--
Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...
Elk Grove Village, IL

Researching Kaplan (Krynki, Poland) Tzipershteyn (Logishin, Pinsk, Belarus), Friedson/Fridzon (Pinsk, Cuba, Massachusetts), Israel and Goodman (Mishnitz, Warsaw, Manchester).


Re: Kohen Hands on Woman's grave stone #usa

Bob Silverstein
 

Graceland has three, small Jewish sections.  Jews are probably buried in the main cemetery.  Ask for photographs on findagrave.  I researched the husband and concluded he was probably not Jewish.  Could not find where he was buried.
--
Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...
Elk Grove Village, IL

Researching Kaplan (Krynki, Poland) Tzipershteyn (Logishin, Pinsk, Belarus), Friedson/Fridzon (Pinsk, Cuba, Massachusetts), Israel and Goodman (Mishnitz, Warsaw, Manchester).


Reading manifest of Leiser Fiksler and deposit in emigrant bank by brother #records

Marilyn Levinson
 

Hello researchers
I am trying to decipher the entries for Leiser Fiksler on the passenger manifest line 12.  I am attaching the arriving passenger document, but believe the manifest itself needs to be seen on a computer. Could anyone attempt to decipher his occupation, what is the first name of the Fiksler brother he is going to meet, and there seems to be a note "not at home."  Also who was Leiser leaving behind in Chotin?
Finally, it seems that on Leiser Fiksler's line on the passenger manifest it states he was either met at the landing station, sent home by steamship company, or passed by special board of inquiry.  Can any one tell me which category seems to be on Leiser's manifest line?
I have also attached a document for the Philadelphia Bank Immigrant Passenger Records.  Would Nathan Fiksler, the brother have deposited the money in the Philadelphia Bank account and then the money or perhaps the tickets themselves would be delivered to Leiser Fiksler in Chotin?I deeply appreciate your help.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Re: 1939 Jewish refugees ship from Europe via Bombay, India. #records

Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Yohanan,

This upcoming online (free) program from The Leo Baeck Institute may be of interest to you.

Rafting to Bombay
An Escape from Poland to India
Tue, Sep 13, 2022, 12:00 PM EDT

To register for the link:
https://www.lbi.org/events/rafting-to-bombay/

The program is Noon EDT.  I think that Melbourne is 14 hours ahead of EDT. The Leo Baeck Institute has a YouTube channel, so you should also be able to watch the recording when it gets posted.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish

Searching:
RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala, Lith.); LEFFENFELD / FINK / KALTER (Daliowa & Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BLEIWEISS (Tarnow & Tarnobrzeg, Pol.); WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.); SOLON / SOLAN / SOKOLSKY (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / BLUMENKRANZ / APPEL / WEINER / ROSENBERG (Vysoko-Litovsk, Brest, Biala Podlaska)


Re: Kaunas Regional State Archives - Excellent Service #lithuania

Stephen Katz
 

Since several people have asked, here is further information about how I requested documents from the Kaunas Regional State Archives. The email address I used to transmit my request was kaunas@.... The documents I requested were internal passport and related documents extracted in a litvaksig spreadsheet. I essentially sent them a shot of the spreadsheet entries, which included the data they needed to locate the documents, such as names, dates, places, and archive/fond/etc.identifiers.
Stephen Katz


Reminder: Jewish Genealogy SIG (JGSIG) Sept meeting - Tues Sept 13 2022 1:2:30 pm EDT on Zoom RSVP #jgs-iajgs #announcements #education #events

Arthur Sissman
 

Hi,

We have a guest presenter this month! I Michael Snyder.  Michael will speak on 2 topics - and you will get to ask questions.
If you are a Geni.com user this might just be the tool (Smart Copy) you have been looking for and want to know how to use it

 

Topic 1 - Smart Copy

Tool for copying genealogical data into Geni.

SmartCopy is a web browser extension that helps Geni users copy and update information and profiles from various sources into Geni.

 

Topic 2 - Face Compare Tool at JGSGW developed by I Michael Snyder.  Try it ahead of the meeting so you can ask questions! 

 

I will be sending out a Resource Guide for Geni (EYWTKAGeniBWATA!) and Face Compare to all who sign up for the meeting.

 

Please request a Zoom link by sending an email to Arthur Sissman, genresearch13@... 

 

If you are new to the Jewish Genealogy SIG, I need the following info to send you a Zoom link and the handout(s):

  1. Your name
  2. Your email address
  3. Your location
  4. Your phone # 

 

You will receive an acknowledgement and the link will arrive soon after the request is received!

--

Regards,

Arthur Sissman

Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier/Lee Co FL

genresearch13@...

genresearch13 @yahoo.com (copy and close space in email format to send email, if necessary)
954-328-3559

Join our FB page at Jewish Genealogy SIG: https://www.facebook.com/groups/hellojewishgen

Genealogy Wise page: http://www.genealogywise.com/profile/ArthurSissman

 

Researching: ZISMAN/ZYSMAN/ZUSMAN (Belarus); TELESHEVSKY (Belarus); CHANUTIN, (W. Russia), BRODY, (Hungary); FRIEDMAN, (Hungary); GRAUBARD, (Romania/Ukraine)

TimeZoneConverterhttps://www.thetimezoneconverter.com/ 

 

 


ORENSTEIN from Kishinev and vicinity #romania #yizkorbooks

Rony Golan
 

I am seeking information on Israel ORENSTEIN & wife Rachel POMERANTZ who used t live before the Holocaust in Kishinev or its vicinity.

Please reply privately.

Thank you!
--
Rony Golan
Ramat HaSharon, Israel

SEARCHING: KRMARUTSKY, KRIVORUCHKI, Kaunas, Lithuania
                        EISDORFER, Hungary
                        SLOMOVITS, Sighet, Romania