Date   

Require translation of Arolsen Archives documents

Rose
 

Dear Group

 

In my recent post I neglected to say that I require German translation of the documents I received from the Arolsen Archives in Germany.

 

Best wishes

 

Rose Raymen

Perth, Western Australia

roseraymen@...

 


Re: Suggestion regarding Family Finder

Todd Edelman
 

How to list this in the Family Finder? Sneak a shortened url into the contact info? It's indeed very frustrating to not be able to add e.g. Geni.com info to anywhere on JG...


Re: Require translation of Arolsen Archives documents

tom
 

when asking for translation help, please specify the language(s) required.  it saves time for the people willing to translate, and makes it more likely that you will get a response.

....... tom klein, toronto


Idea for a new presentation .... reactions?

A. E. Jordan
 

Curious to hear a few reactions to an idea I just had for a new presentation.  Wanted to know if it was offered by your local group would you want to attend or would you say Oh I know that.... and skip it?

My idea is a presentation about the importance of turning over every stone in your genealogy research.

What I would do is show examples of the documents I have found in obvious and not so obvious places.  For example attachments to NYC marriage licenses or documentation attached to a passport application.  Odd bits from probate files. etc.

Of course, not everyone is going to get so lucky to find these documents but the message of the presentation is to not stop looking for the unknown and undiscovered.  I have always been an advocate of taking the research into these lesser used resources and this would be examples of the lucky finds to encourage people to keep going and look in the unsuspecting places.

Would you attend this presentation?

Thanks

Allan Jordan


JGS New York Meeting October 27

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society New York Meeting
Sunday, October 27 at 2 PM

Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York NY

PROGRAM: The Wedding Photo: Genealogy Comes Alive!
SPEAKER: Dan Oren

Co-sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the Center for Jewish History

A visit to an abandoned Polish Jewish cemetery in 1993 launches Dan Oren's twenty-year search to solve the mystery of
"Who is Buried in Sarah's Tomb?" A visit with a cousin unearths a breathtaking photo of a Berlin family wedding from 1926
and leads to discovering their unimaginable post-wedding history. An archivist in Prague discovers a secret uncle whose life
takes the reader from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to the Vatican. A memoir by Philip Roth shocks a daughter
into unlocking a father's concealed past. All these stories are presented in Dan Oren's book The Wedding Photo, which he 
will discuss and share his genealogical research strategies.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dan Oren, M.D. has worked as a psychiatrist and faculty member at Yale University,
the National Institute of Mental Health, and the University of Rzeszow, Poland. He is the author of Joining the Club: A History of
Jews and Yale, and co-authored How to Beat Jet Lag:  A Practical Guide for Air Travelers, as well as numerous scientific articles.
He is the founder and president of the Friends of Jewish Heritage in Poland.

Free for members of JGSNY and CJH; guests welcome, $5 at weddingphoto.bpt.me or at the front desk

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute will be open from 11 am to 4 pm.

More information at our website - jgsny.org or at our Facebook site

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGSNY VP Communications



Re: Jaffa 1903

Rose Feldman
 

This was the period of the Ottoman Empire and IGRA has yet to find any documents dealing with travel documents for this period, or boarding list. People often travelled from Jaffa to one of the French ports on the Mediterranean where they transferred to a ship crossing the Atlantic.

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy


Re: Confusion about subgroup definition #germany

Sam G.
 

Understand. But who sets up groups -- the admin or can anyone else, and if so, how?


On Sun, Oct 20, 2019, 1:06 PM <jbonline1111@...> wrote:
Subgroups include other groups you can join if you wish.  If you click on that heading right now, you will find the yizkorbook subgroup is the only one currently listed.  No doubt it is set up for additional subgroups in the future.


Seeking C[arl] M. SHERMAN in Manayunk, Philadelphia

Stephen Cohen
 

I am seeking any and all information about the brother of a probable cousin, Michael SHERMAN (1877 in Kiev-1954 in North Miami, Florida).

Michael, who lived in Philadelphia, was a conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad. This year I received from the Railroad Pension Board a PDF of scans of his files. In it, Michael says his next of kin (in 1938) was "C.M. Sherman" who lived at 4348 Main St. in Manayunk (which is an area of Philadelphia). Upon Michael's death, an obituary notes that his brother Carl M. Sherman lived in New York (city? state?).

The standard Ancestry and FamilySearch sites do not help (at least with my particular searching techniques). There was a Carl M. Sherman who lived in Philadelphia during the 1st half of the 20th century, married to an Emma Conrad. He was a brushmaker. I do not believe he was the correct C[arl] M. SHERMAN, for his petition for naturalization states that he was born in Lodz. Michael claimed he was born in Kiev.

Michael and Carl's parents were (as per the Pension files) Morris/Moishe SHERMAN and Sarah HERMAN (yes, SHERMAN married HERMAN). 

The ONLY record I can find possibly relating to Morris and Sarah SHERMAN was a 1920 US Census record from Philadelphia for the married couple, both aged 62 (in the correct age bracket), mis-listed in Ancestry. I attach their putative census record here.

Any ideas or assistance is appreciated. My goal is to find more records of Carl, any family he had, any other siblings, and also more details about their parents, including death certificates.

-Steve Cohen

Technical writing for your business and product
For the best in Hebrew and English calligraphy, see www.JudaiCalligraphy.com
Board member, Midwest Jewish Studies Association
Board member, US Section--Royal Society of Chemistry
Contact me for presentations on genealogy





Re: Translation help with Hebrew inscription on grave #austria-czech

fredelfruhman
 

Hello,

May I suggest that you post one of the photos on ViewMate, and include the link to the other photos in your message?  That way, potential translators can easily see if someone else has already helped with this.  The benefit is that people will not be duplicating efforts already done, and others can also make additional comments/corrections easily.


Re: Confusion about subgroup definition #germany

jbonline1111@...
 

Subgroups include other groups you can join if you wish.  If you click on that heading right now, you will find the yizkorbook subgroup is the only one currently listed.  No doubt it is set up for additional subgroups in the future.


French SIG #France Issue 139 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published.

Leghorn (Livorno in Italian) has been for many centuries the hub of the
Jewish communities and trade in the western Mediterranean Sea since the
grand-duke of Tuscany decided in 1591 to welcome the Jews in this city.
Alain and Liliane Nedjar, with Gilles Boulu, have begun to digitalize
and analyze the very rich archives of Leghorn.To demonstrate what can be
obtained >from these archives as well as >from Tunisian and French
sources, these authors treat in details the Busnach family. The first
known Busnach, named Micael, was expelled >from Oran (Algeria) by the
Spanish in 1669 and settled in Leghorn. He had 4 sons: Saad, Ilel, Abram
and Naphtali. Saad had no child, but his three brothers were the
ancestors of extended families which are described by the authors. Some
members settled in Tunis and came back to Leghorn. Others commuted >from
Algiers to Leghorn and Tunis. Some went to Malta and to Minorca. Several
detailed family trees are given.

Robert Romano's paper is divided in two distinct parts. He first tells
the history of his grandfather Reuben Romano, born in Salonika in 1862.
He was first a very wealthy businessman owning a large quarry. But two
events changed his life: first Salonika was conquered by the Greeks in
1912 and the Greek government seized Reuben's quarry since he could not
prove his ownership. Then, on August 18, 1917, a terrible fire destroyed
most of the Jewish neighborhood and Reuben was completely ruined. The
family lived in misery until they decided in 1931 to migrate to Paris.
Alas, on November 5, 1942, the French police arrested a great deal of
Greek Jews. Reuben, aged 80, his wife, two of their children and
several of their grandchildren were deported to Auschwitz and
assassinated.In the second part, the author tries to understand the
origin of the surname Romano which is found all over Europe but
especially in Spain and Italy: Sicily, northern Italy and even,
surprisingly, Rome itself. According to him, this surname derives not
from Rome but >from Romania, the name under which the Byzantine Empire
was known in its time.

Anne-Marie Faraggi-Rychner also deals with her ancestors >from Salonika.
They were protected by the French consulate, a privileged status due
to their activity as drogman or interpreter. Simon Farach (ca. 1750-
1838) is attested as drogman and protected in 1775. His offspring are
given for three generations.

Nadia Hofnung, nee Darmon, describes the most noteworthy members of her
Algerian family. Rabbi Mordekhai Darmon (1730- Oran 1815) was the head
of the Jewish community of Mascara and well appreciated by the local
Ottoman authorities, the bey of Mascara and the dey of Alger. When Oran
was taken by the Turks >from the Spanish in 1792, he moved to this city
where he refounded the Jewish community. When France conquered Algeria,
two brothers, Amran (Oran 1815-Mascara 1878)and Mardochee (Oran
1826-Tlemcen 1898)Darmon became official interpreters in the French
army. Amran played an important role during the revolt of Abd-el-Kader
to protect the Jews stuck between the two armies. He was given the
Legion Honneur in 1852 and the French citizenship by an imperial
decree in 1865. Mardochee lived longer and had official roles as
judiciary interpreter and member of the city council. As his brother, he
was given the French citizenship in 1866, four years before the Cremieux
decree applied to all the Jews of Algeria. Diane Esther Darmon(Tlemcen
1892-Grenoble 1979), the grandmother of Nadia Hofnung, lost her mother
when she was 11 days old. When she was only 15 years old, she married
Sadia Darmon (Lamoriciere 1884 -Beni Saf 1943) who was a rabbi and an
erudite person. When WWI begun, he volunteered in the French Army and
became chaplain. He was gassed in 1916 and lived the rest of his life
with pulmonary problems.

Georges Graner
France


Issue 139 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published.

Leghorn (Livorno in Italian) has been for many centuries the hub of the
Jewish communities and trade in the western Mediterranean Sea since the
grand-duke of Tuscany decided in 1591 to welcome the Jews in this city.
Alain and Liliane Nedjar, with Gilles Boulu, have begun to digitalize
and analyze the very rich archives of Leghorn.To demonstrate what can be
obtained >from these archives as well as >from Tunisian and French
sources, these authors treat in details the Busnach family. The first
known Busnach, named Micael, was expelled >from Oran (Algeria) by the
Spanish in 1669 and settled in Leghorn. He had 4 sons: Saad, Ilel, Abram
and Naphtali. Saad had no child, but his three brothers were the
ancestors of extended families which are described by the authors. Some
members settled in Tunis and came back to Leghorn. Others commuted >from
Algiers to Leghorn and Tunis. Some went to Malta and to Minorca. Several
detailed family trees are given.

Robert Romano's paper is divided in two distinct parts. He first tells
the history of his grandfather Reuben Romano, born in Salonika in 1862.
He was first a very wealthy businessman owning a large quarry. But two
events changed his life: first Salonika was conquered by the Greeks in
1912 and the Greek government seized Reuben's quarry since he could not
prove his ownership. Then, on August 18, 1917, a terrible fire destroyed
most of the Jewish neighborhood and Reuben was completely ruined. The
family lived in misery until they decided in 1931 to migrate to Paris.
Alas, on November 5, 1942, the French police arrested a great deal of
Greek Jews. Reuben, aged 80, his wife, two of their children and
several of their grandchildren were deported to Auschwitz and
assassinated.In the second part, the author tries to understand the
origin of the surname Romano which is found all over Europe but
especially in Spain and Italy: Sicily, northern Italy and even,
surprisingly, Rome itself. According to him, this surname derives not
from Rome but >from Romania, the name under which the Byzantine Empire
was known in its time.

Anne-Marie Faraggi-Rychner also deals with her ancestors >from Salonika.
They were protected by the French consulate, a privileged status due
to their activity as drogman or interpreter. Simon Farach (ca. 1750-
1838) is attested as drogman and protected in 1775. His offspring are
given for three generations.

Nadia Hofnung, nee Darmon, describes the most noteworthy members of her
Algerian family. Rabbi Mordekhai Darmon (1730- Oran 1815) was the head
of the Jewish community of Mascara and well appreciated by the local
Ottoman authorities, the bey of Mascara and the dey of Alger. When Oran
was taken by the Turks >from the Spanish in 1792, he moved to this city
where he refounded the Jewish community. When France conquered Algeria,
two brothers, Amran (Oran 1815-Mascara 1878)and Mardochee (Oran
1826-Tlemcen 1898)Darmon became official interpreters in the French
army. Amran played an important role during the revolt of Abd-el-Kader
to protect the Jews stuck between the two armies. He was given the
Legion Honneur in 1852 and the French citizenship by an imperial
decree in 1865. Mardochee lived longer and had official roles as
judiciary interpreter and member of the city council. As his brother, he
was given the French citizenship in 1866, four years before the Cremieux
decree applied to all the Jews of Algeria. Diane Esther Darmon(Tlemcen
1892-Grenoble 1979), the grandmother of Nadia Hofnung, lost her mother
when she was 11 days old. When she was only 15 years old, she married
Sadia Darmon (Lamoriciere 1884 -Beni Saf 1943) who was a rabbi and an
erudite person. When WWI begun, he volunteered in the French Army and
became chaplain. He was gassed in 1916 and lived the rest of his life
with pulmonary problems.

Georges Graner
France


Re: Healthcare in Belarus: This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks

N. Summers
 

Wow! My grandfather had two sisters who became nurses and stayed behind when the rest of the family came to the US. The family was living in Radzilov, Volyn, #Belarus but I have not been able to find out where the two sisters went to nursing school, or what happened to them. Do you know anything about the nurses who worked at the hospital in #Minsk? Their maiden names would have been #Finkelstein, but one or both probably got married. Not sure if this was before or after nursing school.

I have a photograph of the graduating class from the nursing school. I would love to find out where it is. Does anyone knows how I could figure this out? I think it would’ve been in the 1910’s. I will post the photo in the viewing program (which I haven’t found yet). I think there is some writing also on the back, which  probably is in Yiddish. that also might provide some clues.

Many thanks

 

Nancy Summers
MarylanD


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Brno during the War #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

My father was born in 1912 and moved to Brno by himself as a young
man (>from Subcarpathian Ruthenia). He gradually became successful as
a small business owner. When the nazis arrived he was living under
false papers for himself showing he was not jewish. These apparently
held up for about 2 years, but around 1941 he was found out, stripped
of his possessions, and deported back to his birthplace. He
subsequently served in a Hungarian forced labor unit on the Russian
front. Eventually he was allowed to return to his birthplace, and
then he was deported to Auschwitz with all the other Jews >from his
town in Spring of 1944.

Is anyone aware of any published memoirs of Jews who were living in
Brno in the 1939-1941 period, or any other published materials that
might bear on my father's experience?

Thanks for any help on this.

Stanley M. Dub, Esq.
20600 Chagrin Blvd., Suite 400
Cleveland, OH 44122


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Dual Citizenship #austria-czech

feising2@...
 

A lot of emails have recently surfaced regarding the Austrian
government granting citizenship to descendants of victims of the
Holocaust. I myself have been interested in that subject and followed
it for years. However, one should be aware of the U.S. position
regarding dual nationality. The below states that position.

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/travel-legal-considerations/Advice-about-Possible-Loss-of-US-Nationality-Dual-Nationality/Dual-Nationality.html
Frank Eisinger


Dual Citizenship #austria-czech

feising2@...
 

A lot of emails have recently surfaced regarding the Austrian
government granting citizenship to descendants of victims of the
Holocaust. I myself have been interested in that subject and followed
it for years. However, one should be aware of the U.S. position
regarding dual nationality. The below states that position.

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/travel-legal-considerations/Advice-about-Possible-Loss-of-US-Nationality-Dual-Nationality/Dual-Nationality.html
Frank Eisinger


Brno during the War #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

My father was born in 1912 and moved to Brno by himself as a young
man (>from Subcarpathian Ruthenia). He gradually became successful as
a small business owner. When the nazis arrived he was living under
false papers for himself showing he was not jewish. These apparently
held up for about 2 years, but around 1941 he was found out, stripped
of his possessions, and deported back to his birthplace. He
subsequently served in a Hungarian forced labor unit on the Russian
front. Eventually he was allowed to return to his birthplace, and
then he was deported to Auschwitz with all the other Jews >from his
town in Spring of 1944.

Is anyone aware of any published memoirs of Jews who were living in
Brno in the 1939-1941 period, or any other published materials that
might bear on my father's experience?

Thanks for any help on this.

Stanley M. Dub, Esq.
20600 Chagrin Blvd., Suite 400
Cleveland, OH 44122


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuania 1874 Revision List Question #lithuania

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

The 1874 revision list includes Part 1 and Part 2. Can someone please
explain the difference? The formatting is slightly different as well.

Also, does anyone know if the films are digitized and available online?

Thank you.

Jerry Zeisler
Portland, Oregon USA


Lithuania 1874 Revision List Question #lithuania

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

The 1874 revision list includes Part 1 and Part 2. Can someone please
explain the difference? The formatting is slightly different as well.

Also, does anyone know if the films are digitized and available online?

Thank you.

Jerry Zeisler
Portland, Oregon USA


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation Request #poland

Nomi Waksberg <nwaksberg@...>
 

I've posted 5 vital records in Polish for which I need a translations:

They are on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72186
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72182
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72157
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72152
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72149


Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

As always, thank you very much for your time and assistance.
Nomi Fiszenfeld Waksberg

Researching also Braun, Frydman, Zyngier, Wolkowicz, Elwig,
Burman, Rambaum, Bijak, Gryzmek, Lewkowicz (relative by marriage)

38261 - 38280 of 675046