Date   

Russian Translation needed #general

Ione Greene
 

Please can someone translate the Russian writing which is on the back of
this photo. Check ViewMate posting #4406.
Thank you for any help.

Ione Greene
igreene@socal.rr.com

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct URL of the image is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4406
Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian Translation needed #general

Ione Greene
 

Please can someone translate the Russian writing which is on the back of
this photo. Check ViewMate posting #4406.
Thank you for any help.

Ione Greene
igreene@socal.rr.com

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct URL of the image is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4406
Please reply privately.


JG tips: Viruses, worms, and spam, oh my! #general

Barbara Niederhoff <iamthewind@...>
 

We get lots of messages telling about viruses or spam that come disguised
as JewishGen messages, or that subscriber e-mail addresses have been
harvested by spammers, or similar troubles. Please keep these things in
mind:

1. Do not post this information to the Discussion Group. It's not
genealogy. It cannot be solved on this list.

2. All of these problems are a risk of being online, and more so when
you post to a public list such as this one. There is nothing private
about the Discussion Group -- it is mirrored in the newsgroup
soc.genealogy.jewish where e-mail addresses are free for the taking by
anyone who wants them.

3. It is your responsibility to take any necessary precautions, such as:
Back up your system (Must do!)
Up-to-date virus software (Must have!)
Update your browser (Check the maunfacturer's website)
Firewall
Spam protection (Can be >from ISP, or separate software, or separate
e-mail accounts, ...?)
If an e-mail looks suspicious, treat it suspiciously.
Don't open any attachment unless you know it's safe!

This is not an exhaustive list; there may be other ideas which you can
find elsewhere.

4. Be considerate of others. If you use a spam trap, make sure to tell
the other readers how to reply to you, or you will be left wondering why
no one answers. When sending a message to a fellow genner, pay attention
to their reply instructions. Make your purpose as clear as possible in
the subject line. Never send anyone an attachment unless they've agreed
beforehand to accept it. Otherwise your message may be deleted without
even being read.

Wherever mischief can be done, it will be done. So take a tip >from the
scouts and be prepared.

Barbara Niederhoff
for the JewishGen moderation team


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JG tips: Viruses, worms, and spam, oh my! #general

Barbara Niederhoff <iamthewind@...>
 

We get lots of messages telling about viruses or spam that come disguised
as JewishGen messages, or that subscriber e-mail addresses have been
harvested by spammers, or similar troubles. Please keep these things in
mind:

1. Do not post this information to the Discussion Group. It's not
genealogy. It cannot be solved on this list.

2. All of these problems are a risk of being online, and more so when
you post to a public list such as this one. There is nothing private
about the Discussion Group -- it is mirrored in the newsgroup
soc.genealogy.jewish where e-mail addresses are free for the taking by
anyone who wants them.

3. It is your responsibility to take any necessary precautions, such as:
Back up your system (Must do!)
Up-to-date virus software (Must have!)
Update your browser (Check the maunfacturer's website)
Firewall
Spam protection (Can be >from ISP, or separate software, or separate
e-mail accounts, ...?)
If an e-mail looks suspicious, treat it suspiciously.
Don't open any attachment unless you know it's safe!

This is not an exhaustive list; there may be other ideas which you can
find elsewhere.

4. Be considerate of others. If you use a spam trap, make sure to tell
the other readers how to reply to you, or you will be left wondering why
no one answers. When sending a message to a fellow genner, pay attention
to their reply instructions. Make your purpose as clear as possible in
the subject line. Never send anyone an attachment unless they've agreed
beforehand to accept it. Otherwise your message may be deleted without
even being read.

Wherever mischief can be done, it will be done. So take a tip >from the
scouts and be prepared.

Barbara Niederhoff
for the JewishGen moderation team


Tillie - a bona-fide English name #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Steve Orlen of Tucson AZ wrote on 1 July: Among the more popular
given names chosen by our immigrant ancestors was "Tillie."
.... do you happen to know any of the range of Hebrew or Yiddish names
this was transmogrified from? He received many replies and plumped for
Taube as the origin.

First, let me state that, unlike Michael Bernet [see his reply on 13 July]
I have no real academic knowledge on the subject of Hebrew names
other than that I have picked up in my research over the past few years.
However in this instance, as in many others, I start with the problem and
look at the evidence available to me >from the comfort of my home-computer
and my general knowledge. And there is plenty - but it maybe wrong!
A search through the UK and US census records show that Taube was
almost non-existent as a first name in registrations. Ottilie was
relatively rare and the holders were largely of Germanic origin - in the UK
at least - and Mathilde [and variants] are also mainly "continental".
However, if you search for Tillie in England and Wales there is an amazing
upward trend towards the name in the late 1800s and the holders appear
to be English and not Jewish. The same happens in the US, where the name
is popular amongst African-Americans too in the South . The reason for this
sudden surge in popularity is unknown to me at present. This rise in
popularity of non-Jewish Tillies coincides with the big influx of immigrants
into the UK and the US >from Eastern Europe. No wonder they were
attracted to the name!

If you look up Tillie in the 1881 England census, you come across another
possible clue: You cannot search by first name but I struck lucky with a few
combinations.Two instances are cited of the alternative names Tillah or
Zillah. Again the holders, mother and daughter were English.

*Tillah or Zillah BROWN born in 1841 in Great Easton, Leicester, England
Manageress of The Cocoa & Coffee Rooms (House Aylestone) married to
Seth BROWN a stone mason with five children inc. a daughter also called
Tillah or Zilla.

So it occurs to me that the Jewish "Tillie" could have been a transcription
of Cillie or Tzillie [as pronounced in German]. "Tzillie" was a very popular
name in the enormous Habsburg Empire and could have been derived >from a
Hebrew name. To corroborate my findings, I looked up Tillie and Galicia
[where German was the official language] on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/search.htm
and found the following:

Legal/Hebrew: Tsetsilya Gender: F Yiddish: Tsetsiliya
Yiddish Origin: Cecilia (Latin origin)
Yiddish Nickname: Tseske / Tseytl / Tsesya / Tsilye
US Name: Cecilia / Cilia / Tillie / Zeitel

Late 18th century Bohemia, a largely German-speaking area,
[ie not Yiddish] does not show up any names related to the above
found in Galicia. Cecilia is conspicuous by its absence. Bohemian Jews
as well as those >from Pressburg and Galicia migrated to Vienna in the
second half of the 19th century and that is where the name Cecilia and
Tsillie becomes common - as non-Jewish "Tillie" does in England
& America. Even without TV or text messaging, news travelled fast
in the 19th century!

Celia Male [UK]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tillie - a bona-fide English name #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Steve Orlen of Tucson AZ wrote on 1 July: Among the more popular
given names chosen by our immigrant ancestors was "Tillie."
.... do you happen to know any of the range of Hebrew or Yiddish names
this was transmogrified from? He received many replies and plumped for
Taube as the origin.

First, let me state that, unlike Michael Bernet [see his reply on 13 July]
I have no real academic knowledge on the subject of Hebrew names
other than that I have picked up in my research over the past few years.
However in this instance, as in many others, I start with the problem and
look at the evidence available to me >from the comfort of my home-computer
and my general knowledge. And there is plenty - but it maybe wrong!
A search through the UK and US census records show that Taube was
almost non-existent as a first name in registrations. Ottilie was
relatively rare and the holders were largely of Germanic origin - in the UK
at least - and Mathilde [and variants] are also mainly "continental".
However, if you search for Tillie in England and Wales there is an amazing
upward trend towards the name in the late 1800s and the holders appear
to be English and not Jewish. The same happens in the US, where the name
is popular amongst African-Americans too in the South . The reason for this
sudden surge in popularity is unknown to me at present. This rise in
popularity of non-Jewish Tillies coincides with the big influx of immigrants
into the UK and the US >from Eastern Europe. No wonder they were
attracted to the name!

If you look up Tillie in the 1881 England census, you come across another
possible clue: You cannot search by first name but I struck lucky with a few
combinations.Two instances are cited of the alternative names Tillah or
Zillah. Again the holders, mother and daughter were English.

*Tillah or Zillah BROWN born in 1841 in Great Easton, Leicester, England
Manageress of The Cocoa & Coffee Rooms (House Aylestone) married to
Seth BROWN a stone mason with five children inc. a daughter also called
Tillah or Zilla.

So it occurs to me that the Jewish "Tillie" could have been a transcription
of Cillie or Tzillie [as pronounced in German]. "Tzillie" was a very popular
name in the enormous Habsburg Empire and could have been derived >from a
Hebrew name. To corroborate my findings, I looked up Tillie and Galicia
[where German was the official language] on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/search.htm
and found the following:

Legal/Hebrew: Tsetsilya Gender: F Yiddish: Tsetsiliya
Yiddish Origin: Cecilia (Latin origin)
Yiddish Nickname: Tseske / Tseytl / Tsesya / Tsilye
US Name: Cecilia / Cilia / Tillie / Zeitel

Late 18th century Bohemia, a largely German-speaking area,
[ie not Yiddish] does not show up any names related to the above
found in Galicia. Cecilia is conspicuous by its absence. Bohemian Jews
as well as those >from Pressburg and Galicia migrated to Vienna in the
second half of the 19th century and that is where the name Cecilia and
Tsillie becomes common - as non-Jewish "Tillie" does in England
& America. Even without TV or text messaging, news travelled fast
in the 19th century!

Celia Male [UK]


Searching LUPOLIANSKI from Golovanevsk-Ukraine #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Friends,
As you probably know,the Mayor of Jerusalem,Mr. Uri
Lupolianski, greeted a week ago the participants of
the IAJGS conference. In his greetings he challanged
the audience to try to uncover his roots since he
knows so little about his origins.Well some of us are
ready to do it but need your help.It seems that his
grandfather Joseph Lupolianski was born in
Golovanevsk, Ukraine between 1878-1882. He escaped
from there to Brody after a mini pogrom in 1904. The
mayor's father Jacob was born in Brodi in 1904. His
mother was Sarah Landau who was born in 1886??? in
Dukla,Galicia.During WW1 the family left to
Germany.Joseph died in Karlsruhe in 1937.
It seems that Joseph had brothers and sisters but we
know nothing about them.We also do not know the names
of his parents.
Any help or clues about their origins in Golovanevsk
are welcome. Please respond privately,unless there is
a general interest in the details or there is a chance
that your details may generate more info.
Many thanks >from Jerusalem.
Jacob Rosen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching LUPOLIANSKI from Golovanevsk-Ukraine #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Friends,
As you probably know,the Mayor of Jerusalem,Mr. Uri
Lupolianski, greeted a week ago the participants of
the IAJGS conference. In his greetings he challanged
the audience to try to uncover his roots since he
knows so little about his origins.Well some of us are
ready to do it but need your help.It seems that his
grandfather Joseph Lupolianski was born in
Golovanevsk, Ukraine between 1878-1882. He escaped
from there to Brody after a mini pogrom in 1904. The
mayor's father Jacob was born in Brodi in 1904. His
mother was Sarah Landau who was born in 1886??? in
Dukla,Galicia.During WW1 the family left to
Germany.Joseph died in Karlsruhe in 1937.
It seems that Joseph had brothers and sisters but we
know nothing about them.We also do not know the names
of his parents.
Any help or clues about their origins in Golovanevsk
are welcome. Please respond privately,unless there is
a general interest in the details or there is a chance
that your details may generate more info.
Many thanks >from Jerusalem.
Jacob Rosen


Re: Buenos Aires Cemetery Information #latinamerica

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

1.
Asociaci=F3n Mutual Israelita Argentina Familiares - Buenos Aires=20
Fax+54-11-4959-8857 President: Abraham KAUL Jorge Finkielman=20
<finki_1@YAHOO.COM> finki_1@YAHOO.COM,

2.
Sorry, no results were found containing "www. amia.org.ar/difuntos. asp"

MODERATOR NOTE: URLs have no spaces. Try www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp


Jerusalem Post - It's All Relative - conference round-up #latvia

Micha Reisel
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti's newest It's All Relative, "Connecting the
Clans," offers some of the flavor of this year's 24th IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem.

It can be viewed at the following URL (easy access, no registration
required). Remember to cut-and-paste the entire URL into your browser.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/Printer&cid=1089861294366&p=1008596975996

or use the folowing link http://tinyurl.com/56fy5
it is the same page

take care & shabbat shalom
micha

Micha Reisel, publisher & consultant, Hod HaSharon, Israel. tel: 0544-788-218
Jewish Family History Publishing, see www.toldot.net for details .
Searching for: Lithuania: REISEL >from Shaki, SMOLIZANSKI >from Kalvarija.
Belarus: WIGDOROWITZ (VIGDOROVICH) >from Ostryna.
Germany: LIEFMANN >from Hanau, WEINBERG & BUECHLER >from Neustadtgoedens.
The Netherlands: MULLER & VAN ENGEL >from Goor, WOLFF >from Meppel.


Latin America #LatinAmerica Re: Buenos Aires Cemetery Information #latinamerica

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

1.
Asociaci=F3n Mutual Israelita Argentina Familiares - Buenos Aires=20
Fax+54-11-4959-8857 President: Abraham KAUL Jorge Finkielman=20
<finki_1@YAHOO.COM> finki_1@YAHOO.COM,

2.
Sorry, no results were found containing "www. amia.org.ar/difuntos. asp"

MODERATOR NOTE: URLs have no spaces. Try www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp


Latvia SIG #Latvia Jerusalem Post - It's All Relative - conference round-up #latvia

Micha Reisel
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti's newest It's All Relative, "Connecting the
Clans," offers some of the flavor of this year's 24th IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem.

It can be viewed at the following URL (easy access, no registration
required). Remember to cut-and-paste the entire URL into your browser.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/Printer&cid=1089861294366&p=1008596975996

or use the folowing link http://tinyurl.com/56fy5
it is the same page

take care & shabbat shalom
micha

Micha Reisel, publisher & consultant, Hod HaSharon, Israel. tel: 0544-788-218
Jewish Family History Publishing, see www.toldot.net for details .
Searching for: Lithuania: REISEL >from Shaki, SMOLIZANSKI >from Kalvarija.
Belarus: WIGDOROWITZ (VIGDOROVICH) >from Ostryna.
Germany: LIEFMANN >from Hanau, WEINBERG & BUECHLER >from Neustadtgoedens.
The Netherlands: MULLER & VAN ENGEL >from Goor, WOLFF >from Meppel.


SANDLER in Mexico City #latinamerica

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the family of my grandmother's cousin. My grandmother's
father, Joe GOLDBERG (born Krakes, Lithuania 1882; died NYC in 1970) had a
sister (possibly named Chava) who was married in Lithuania to a man named
Schmuel SANDLER.
During or after the Holocaust, Chava and one of her sons named Abraham
SANDLER went to Lugano, Switzerland. This son Abraham SANDLER was a
physician, apparently never married or had children, and died in Lugano in
his 70s during the mid-1960s. His mother died possibly in the 1950s and is
buried in Zurich, Switzerland. The other son (? SANDLER) went to Mexico
City during or after the Holocaust, was married and had a family. I don't
know if this family stayed in Mexico City, but was in Mexico at least until
the 1960s. This son might have been a professor at a university in Mexico
City, is very likely deceased, and his children could be in their 70-80s.
My family was never in contact with this family in Mexico City. Any
possibility that someone knows of this family? If not, can anyone lead me
to a way to find information about the Jewish community in Mexico City or
1940s Jewish immigrants to Mexico?

Thanks,

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI


Latin America #LatinAmerica SANDLER in Mexico City #latinamerica

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the family of my grandmother's cousin. My grandmother's
father, Joe GOLDBERG (born Krakes, Lithuania 1882; died NYC in 1970) had a
sister (possibly named Chava) who was married in Lithuania to a man named
Schmuel SANDLER.
During or after the Holocaust, Chava and one of her sons named Abraham
SANDLER went to Lugano, Switzerland. This son Abraham SANDLER was a
physician, apparently never married or had children, and died in Lugano in
his 70s during the mid-1960s. His mother died possibly in the 1950s and is
buried in Zurich, Switzerland. The other son (? SANDLER) went to Mexico
City during or after the Holocaust, was married and had a family. I don't
know if this family stayed in Mexico City, but was in Mexico at least until
the 1960s. This son might have been a professor at a university in Mexico
City, is very likely deceased, and his children could be in their 70-80s.
My family was never in contact with this family in Mexico City. Any
possibility that someone knows of this family? If not, can anyone lead me
to a way to find information about the Jewish community in Mexico City or
1940s Jewish immigrants to Mexico?

Thanks,

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI


Re: Buenos Aires Cemetery Information #latinamerica

Mark Schwartzman <mark@...>
 

I have not posted to this group before and am not sure of the rules, but
the moderator asked that responses be made privately to Bill - I am seeking
the same information. I do not understand why responses should be private
when this information might be of use to the group.

I have tentative plans to travel to Buenos Aires in the fall and MIGHT be
able to check on a few graves if I have the time.

Mark Schwartzman

MODERATOR NOTE: Since Bill asked for cost, we needed to consider that there are
professional researchers who would respond quoting fees. Messages of that nature are not postable to the group. However, if you read the mod note carefully you will see that it was also suggested that information of general nature be posted to the group. Rob Weisskirch, co-founder of the Latamsig, posted such a response.


Latin America #LatinAmerica Re: Buenos Aires Cemetery Information #latinamerica

Mark Schwartzman <mark@...>
 

I have not posted to this group before and am not sure of the rules, but
the moderator asked that responses be made privately to Bill - I am seeking
the same information. I do not understand why responses should be private
when this information might be of use to the group.

I have tentative plans to travel to Buenos Aires in the fall and MIGHT be
able to check on a few graves if I have the time.

Mark Schwartzman

MODERATOR NOTE: Since Bill asked for cost, we needed to consider that there are
professional researchers who would respond quoting fees. Messages of that nature are not postable to the group. However, if you read the mod note carefully you will see that it was also suggested that information of general nature be posted to the group. Rob Weisskirch, co-founder of the Latamsig, posted such a response.


Indices to burials - Bielsko Biala Cemetery, Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database now includes indices to
the historic Jewish cemetery in Bielsko-Biala (this town was formed
from the merger of two towns Bielsk and Biala, 55 km south of Katowice
and WSW of Krakow.)

The Bielsk cemetery has been in continuous use for more than 150 years,
including the German occupation during World War II.

The Biala cemetery was liquidated by Polish authorities in 1966 over
strong protests of the Jewish Community; very few of the graves were
exhumed and transferred to the Bielsko cemetery and these are
included in the database

The indices were created by "Bear" - Historyczne Centrum Badawcze
(Historical Research Center), at the request of the Jewish
Denominational Community in Bielsko-Biala and the Irgun Yots'e
Bielsko-Biala in Israel.

Four sources were used in creating the database, gravestones, vital
records (death registrations), the Chevra Kadisha funeral register and
death/funeral announcements >from regional newspapers. The sources
often used different spellings of the names. As a result, all spelling
variations have been incorporated into the database.

The oldest gravestone in the Bielsko cemetery is the matzevah of a
seventeen-year-old boy named Josef Neumann, who died on
16 Elul 5609 of the Hebrew calendar, or September 3, 1849.
The two oldest recorded members of the Bielsko Jewish community
were Salomon Hamburger and Benjamin Falek. Both lived to be
104 years of age and both are buried in Bielsko. Hamburger
lived >from 1771 to 1875 and Falek >from 1896 to 2000.

In March 2002, Bear and Jewish Records Indexing - Poland reached
an agreement to make available Internet-searchable indices to 6300
surviving gravestones in the cemetery. These indices will also be
available in the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry.

Years of death in the indices are >from 1849 to 1959, and thus
provide 20th century genealogical information not otherwise available
due to lack of - or inaccessibility to - death records.

For those who know of family buried in the cemetery, these indices
will be a welcome short cut for finding graves and obtaining further
information.

For others who search the JRI-Poland database on a regular basis,
there may be an unexpected surprise of finding family surnames and
perhaps ancestors and relatives in the Bielsko-Biala Jewish Cemetery.

For more information on the project, please read the following web page:

http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/bielsk.htm

The search process:

The indices to the matzevot in the Jewish Cemetery in have been
integrated into the JRI-Poland database.

To narrow the search, on the JRI-Poland search page, enter the surname
of interest and then the latitude and longitude of Bielsko-Biala (4949/1902)
in the distance >from registration search. Specify a 1 mile radius
If a match in the "Bielsko-Biala" Cemetery database is found, it will be
identified in a separate table in the search results.

To request information on a particular grave or obtain photographs, fill
out the suggested Request for Information Form which is linked on the
Bielsko-Biala information page http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/bielsk.htm

Stanley Diamond


JRI Poland #Poland Indices to burials - Bielsko Biala Cemetery, Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database now includes indices to
the historic Jewish cemetery in Bielsko-Biala (this town was formed
from the merger of two towns Bielsk and Biala, 55 km south of Katowice
and WSW of Krakow.)

The Bielsk cemetery has been in continuous use for more than 150 years,
including the German occupation during World War II.

The Biala cemetery was liquidated by Polish authorities in 1966 over
strong protests of the Jewish Community; very few of the graves were
exhumed and transferred to the Bielsko cemetery and these are
included in the database

The indices were created by "Bear" - Historyczne Centrum Badawcze
(Historical Research Center), at the request of the Jewish
Denominational Community in Bielsko-Biala and the Irgun Yots'e
Bielsko-Biala in Israel.

Four sources were used in creating the database, gravestones, vital
records (death registrations), the Chevra Kadisha funeral register and
death/funeral announcements >from regional newspapers. The sources
often used different spellings of the names. As a result, all spelling
variations have been incorporated into the database.

The oldest gravestone in the Bielsko cemetery is the matzevah of a
seventeen-year-old boy named Josef Neumann, who died on
16 Elul 5609 of the Hebrew calendar, or September 3, 1849.
The two oldest recorded members of the Bielsko Jewish community
were Salomon Hamburger and Benjamin Falek. Both lived to be
104 years of age and both are buried in Bielsko. Hamburger
lived >from 1771 to 1875 and Falek >from 1896 to 2000.

In March 2002, Bear and Jewish Records Indexing - Poland reached
an agreement to make available Internet-searchable indices to 6300
surviving gravestones in the cemetery. These indices will also be
available in the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry.

Years of death in the indices are >from 1849 to 1959, and thus
provide 20th century genealogical information not otherwise available
due to lack of - or inaccessibility to - death records.

For those who know of family buried in the cemetery, these indices
will be a welcome short cut for finding graves and obtaining further
information.

For others who search the JRI-Poland database on a regular basis,
there may be an unexpected surprise of finding family surnames and
perhaps ancestors and relatives in the Bielsko-Biala Jewish Cemetery.

For more information on the project, please read the following web page:

http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/bielsk.htm

The search process:

The indices to the matzevot in the Jewish Cemetery in have been
integrated into the JRI-Poland database.

To narrow the search, on the JRI-Poland search page, enter the surname
of interest and then the latitude and longitude of Bielsko-Biala (4949/1902)
in the distance >from registration search. Specify a 1 mile radius
If a match in the "Bielsko-Biala" Cemetery database is found, it will be
identified in a separate table in the search results.

To request information on a particular grave or obtain photographs, fill
out the suggested Request for Information Form which is linked on the
Bielsko-Biala information page http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/bielsk.htm

Stanley Diamond


Buenos AIres Cemetery Information #latinamerica

Rob Weisskirch <rob_weisskirch@...>
 

Bill and others,

First, read Diana Nimcovicz's InfoFile on research in Argentina.

from the cemetery database, most immediately, you can request a "Certificada de Difuncion" (a death certificate) >from the correct Registro Civil (Civil Register). "Correct" would be whether you are talking about within the city of Buenos Aires or
the province. In the past, it's been $15 (now it might be more) in a regular American check for each one, given the exact date of death. Often, grandparents' names are included but are only as reliable as the reporting person gave to the Registro
Civil. I have not seen town listed but broad categories of nationality (e.g., rusia [russia], rumania [romania], bessarabia). You are better off writing in Spanish giving as many details as you can.

The next database ought to be CEMLA, which contains many arrivals >from 1882-1939. http://www.cemla.com/paginas/c_busqueda.htm They may have more information about place of origin and birthdate. With arrival info, often the embarcation port is
Hamburg. You can then look at the Hamburg Passenger List films manually to pull that information.

You can also try the Bremen passenger lists that often indicate Buenos Aires as the port. http://db.genealogy.net/maus/

Next, you might try the Argentine Jewish Genealogy Society. http://www.agja.com.ar. They have cementery information and early settler and schooling databases. Each individual name search is between $15-20 dollars. The cemetery information
includes some of the cemeteries outside of Buenos Aires.

This is my 2 cents,

Rob
Rob Weisskirch, MSW, Ph.D.
Seaside, CA


Latin America #LatinAmerica Buenos AIres Cemetery Information #latinamerica

Rob Weisskirch <rob_weisskirch@...>
 

Bill and others,

First, read Diana Nimcovicz's InfoFile on research in Argentina.

from the cemetery database, most immediately, you can request a "Certificada de Difuncion" (a death certificate) >from the correct Registro Civil (Civil Register). "Correct" would be whether you are talking about within the city of Buenos Aires or
the province. In the past, it's been $15 (now it might be more) in a regular American check for each one, given the exact date of death. Often, grandparents' names are included but are only as reliable as the reporting person gave to the Registro
Civil. I have not seen town listed but broad categories of nationality (e.g., rusia [russia], rumania [romania], bessarabia). You are better off writing in Spanish giving as many details as you can.

The next database ought to be CEMLA, which contains many arrivals >from 1882-1939. http://www.cemla.com/paginas/c_busqueda.htm They may have more information about place of origin and birthdate. With arrival info, often the embarcation port is
Hamburg. You can then look at the Hamburg Passenger List films manually to pull that information.

You can also try the Bremen passenger lists that often indicate Buenos Aires as the port. http://db.genealogy.net/maus/

Next, you might try the Argentine Jewish Genealogy Society. http://www.agja.com.ar. They have cementery information and early settler and schooling databases. Each individual name search is between $15-20 dollars. The cemetery information
includes some of the cemeteries outside of Buenos Aires.

This is my 2 cents,

Rob
Rob Weisskirch, MSW, Ph.D.
Seaside, CA