Date   

NY Times article on genealogy & genetics #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those interested in the ***non-technical*** aspects and implications of
genealogy and genetics, this very interesting article in today's (July 31)
New York Times discusses the importance of a 1.6 million person Mormon
genealogical database in Utah in tracing genetics, as well as the emergence
of Utah as a base for genetics-focused companies.
http://tinyurl.com/5bydz

Headline: By accident, Utah is proving an ideal genetics laboratory

The story mentions Dr. Mark Skolnick of Myriad Genetic Inc., one of the
biggest companies in the new genetics corridor near the University of Utah.
He was a professor and a pioneer in the discovery of the breast cancer gene
marker.
Also referenced: Scott R. Woodward, non-profit Sorenson Molecular Genealogy
Foundation's chief scientist. His group is compiling a global genetic
database to assist people in finding roots, with the aim of having DNA
samples of 100,000 people within a few years, with a Western European focus;
some 40,000 samples are available now.
When the global database is completed, a person should be able to walk into
an office, provide a DNA sample, and receive a report specifying what
place - perhaps even the town or county, if not a region - the person's
genes are most likely from.

Enjoy the read.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
schelly@...

MODERATOR NOTE: The URL provided in the message will take you to page #2 o the article.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY Times article on genealogy & genetics #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those interested in the ***non-technical*** aspects and implications of
genealogy and genetics, this very interesting article in today's (July 31)
New York Times discusses the importance of a 1.6 million person Mormon
genealogical database in Utah in tracing genetics, as well as the emergence
of Utah as a base for genetics-focused companies.
http://tinyurl.com/5bydz

Headline: By accident, Utah is proving an ideal genetics laboratory

The story mentions Dr. Mark Skolnick of Myriad Genetic Inc., one of the
biggest companies in the new genetics corridor near the University of Utah.
He was a professor and a pioneer in the discovery of the breast cancer gene
marker.
Also referenced: Scott R. Woodward, non-profit Sorenson Molecular Genealogy
Foundation's chief scientist. His group is compiling a global genetic
database to assist people in finding roots, with the aim of having DNA
samples of 100,000 people within a few years, with a Western European focus;
some 40,000 samples are available now.
When the global database is completed, a person should be able to walk into
an office, provide a DNA sample, and receive a report specifying what
place - perhaps even the town or county, if not a region - the person's
genes are most likely from.

Enjoy the read.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
schelly@...

MODERATOR NOTE: The URL provided in the message will take you to page #2 o the article.


Re: SSDI erroneous information, what to do next ? #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Shalom Or,

You are assuming wrongly that your relative died in Florida. The SSDI
listings of "Last Residence" and "Last Benefit" merely indicate that your
relative resided in Florida at the time of death, but she may well have
died in another State while on vacation, on business, etc. The death
certificate would then be submitted by the funeral home in the State where
the event occurred. At the same time, the funeral home would also notify
Social Security. In both cases, the name of the deceased and her Florida
address would appear on the respective documents. A member of our family
was killed in an accident in Pennsylvania and his body was shipped back to
New York for burial. The death certificate was filed in Pennsylvania that
indicated the location where the death occurred, but also included the last
New York residence of the deceased. Hence, the SSDI has New York as the
Last Residence with no further indication that the person died in Pennsylvania.

Three suggestions: Contact a close relative of the deceased who might know
the State where she died, or failing that, contact the cemeteries near her
last residence. They may have records that will help lead you to the
information you are seeking. There is also the possibility as indicated
above that the remains of the deceased was shipped to yet another State
where her spouse (if he died previously) or a prepaid plot for the final
resting place is located near where they used to live in younger days.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Shalom,
I tried to obtain a death certificate of a supposedly
relative of mine. The SSDI (in more than one website)
mentioned that the woman died in Florida in 1991. I
ordered the death certificate >from Florida's State
Office of Vital Statistics and since there was only
one woman by that name who died in Florida in 1991 I
didn't write the SS# in the order form. (wrong, I
know).
To my utter surprise and disappointment the death
certificate that came was of another woman, by the
same name but with a different SS# and with a birth
date which was different than the one mentioned in the
SSDI.
So far Florida's State Office of Vital Statistics were
extremely nice and cooperative and they wrote back
that the death certificate of my relative who had the
SS# which appeared in the SSDI cannot be found in
Florida.
Can someone tell me what to do next :
Whom should I apply to find out where can the death
certificate or my relative, the one appearing in the
SSDI, be found ?
[And as a matter of interest : when searching the SSDI
for the SS# of that woman - not my relative- the
result is of her husband only. This was explained by
the fact that since she was a housewife she had her
husband's SS#. Furthermore, she herself cannot be
found in the SSDI when searching by her name and birth
date.]

Every suggestion will be highly appreciated
Thanking you in advance
Or Shani
n. Haifa,Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SSDI erroneous information, what to do next ? #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Shalom Or,

You are assuming wrongly that your relative died in Florida. The SSDI
listings of "Last Residence" and "Last Benefit" merely indicate that your
relative resided in Florida at the time of death, but she may well have
died in another State while on vacation, on business, etc. The death
certificate would then be submitted by the funeral home in the State where
the event occurred. At the same time, the funeral home would also notify
Social Security. In both cases, the name of the deceased and her Florida
address would appear on the respective documents. A member of our family
was killed in an accident in Pennsylvania and his body was shipped back to
New York for burial. The death certificate was filed in Pennsylvania that
indicated the location where the death occurred, but also included the last
New York residence of the deceased. Hence, the SSDI has New York as the
Last Residence with no further indication that the person died in Pennsylvania.

Three suggestions: Contact a close relative of the deceased who might know
the State where she died, or failing that, contact the cemeteries near her
last residence. They may have records that will help lead you to the
information you are seeking. There is also the possibility as indicated
above that the remains of the deceased was shipped to yet another State
where her spouse (if he died previously) or a prepaid plot for the final
resting place is located near where they used to live in younger days.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Shalom,
I tried to obtain a death certificate of a supposedly
relative of mine. The SSDI (in more than one website)
mentioned that the woman died in Florida in 1991. I
ordered the death certificate >from Florida's State
Office of Vital Statistics and since there was only
one woman by that name who died in Florida in 1991 I
didn't write the SS# in the order form. (wrong, I
know).
To my utter surprise and disappointment the death
certificate that came was of another woman, by the
same name but with a different SS# and with a birth
date which was different than the one mentioned in the
SSDI.
So far Florida's State Office of Vital Statistics were
extremely nice and cooperative and they wrote back
that the death certificate of my relative who had the
SS# which appeared in the SSDI cannot be found in
Florida.
Can someone tell me what to do next :
Whom should I apply to find out where can the death
certificate or my relative, the one appearing in the
SSDI, be found ?
[And as a matter of interest : when searching the SSDI
for the SS# of that woman - not my relative- the
result is of her husband only. This was explained by
the fact that since she was a housewife she had her
husband's SS#. Furthermore, she herself cannot be
found in the SSDI when searching by her name and birth
date.]

Every suggestion will be highly appreciated
Thanking you in advance
Or Shani
n. Haifa,Israel


Berezovka - ROTHMAN #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Would the person who emailed me about Berezovka - ROTHMAN kindly resend
their message? I inadvertently deleted it.

Thank you,
Florence Elman
haflo@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Berezovka - ROTHMAN #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Would the person who emailed me about Berezovka - ROTHMAN kindly resend
their message? I inadvertently deleted it.

Thank you,
Florence Elman
haflo@...


FEINERs of Lemberg #galicia

Ed Leek <ed@...>
 

Looking for FEINER researchers focusing on Lemberg (now Lviv).

Ed Leek
Portland, OR 97225
(Private address and phone deleted)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia FEINERs of Lemberg #galicia

Ed Leek <ed@...>
 

Looking for FEINER researchers focusing on Lemberg (now Lviv).

Ed Leek
Portland, OR 97225
(Private address and phone deleted)


call for assistance #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

The book that I wrote, Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia: A Resource
Guide, published by Avotaynu in 1998, is now out of print. At the
conference in Jerusalem, the demand for it suggested that it would make
sense to revise and republish it in paperback form. I have completed much
of the revision, taking out material that was date-sensitive and material
that is available on the Internet and adding more history and contextual
material about laws and regulations that governed the lives of our
ancestors.

I'd like to say much more about the censuses that seem to be popping up in
various archives around Poland but I will need your help. If you know about
census material, please email me privately at srwynne@....

I'm also open to some new travel stories. The ones in the book are still
good but I'd like to add to that chapter.

The guide will not try to duplicate what is in JewishGen but will describe
how to utilize the resources of JewishGen & Routes to Roots.

If you have specific suggestions that bothered you about the first edition
that would make the second edition more useful, please email me.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia call for assistance #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

The book that I wrote, Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia: A Resource
Guide, published by Avotaynu in 1998, is now out of print. At the
conference in Jerusalem, the demand for it suggested that it would make
sense to revise and republish it in paperback form. I have completed much
of the revision, taking out material that was date-sensitive and material
that is available on the Internet and adding more history and contextual
material about laws and regulations that governed the lives of our
ancestors.

I'd like to say much more about the censuses that seem to be popping up in
various archives around Poland but I will need your help. If you know about
census material, please email me privately at srwynne@....

I'm also open to some new travel stories. The ones in the book are still
good but I'd like to add to that chapter.

The guide will not try to duplicate what is in JewishGen but will describe
how to utilize the resources of JewishGen & Routes to Roots.

If you have specific suggestions that bothered you about the first edition
that would make the second edition more useful, please email me.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Name change #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Logan's question about a surname change raises several interesting points.
First, the process for changing a name is spelled out in the 1877
regulations governing registration. The next issue of The Galitzianer will,
hopefully, outline the most important of these regulations. The process
could have been carried out at the time of birth by the father going with
two witnesses before the registrar to claim parenthood. When the Austrian
government was in "crack down" mode about these regulations, which happened
periodically, the registrar was under pressure to follow the rules strictly.

It sounds like the father did not show up with witnesses at birth, but may
have done so afterward. Why this child and not the others? So many
possibilities, so little information. Maybe the son was about to emigrate
and needed to clear up the records so that he could leave with the proper
name. Maybe the son wanted to get a business license or attend university
and ran into the same issue. Many bureaucratic issues were tied up with the
issue of legitimacy in Austria.

As Logan knows >from experience, usually the Comments column on the right has
an explanation and some reference numbers when there are witnesses, changes,
etc. so I am guessing that this was not the case here. The other
possibility is that the parents had a civil marriage somewhere else, though
usually, that is referenced in the Comments column.

I know that individuals who wanted to have their surnames changed after the
death of the parent could also bring witnesses, including the mother to the
registrar to assert the father's role. I have a record for one such person.
The Comments simply recorded his appearance, the signature of the witnesses
and the explanation that his father was deceased.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Name change #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Logan's question about a surname change raises several interesting points.
First, the process for changing a name is spelled out in the 1877
regulations governing registration. The next issue of The Galitzianer will,
hopefully, outline the most important of these regulations. The process
could have been carried out at the time of birth by the father going with
two witnesses before the registrar to claim parenthood. When the Austrian
government was in "crack down" mode about these regulations, which happened
periodically, the registrar was under pressure to follow the rules strictly.

It sounds like the father did not show up with witnesses at birth, but may
have done so afterward. Why this child and not the others? So many
possibilities, so little information. Maybe the son was about to emigrate
and needed to clear up the records so that he could leave with the proper
name. Maybe the son wanted to get a business license or attend university
and ran into the same issue. Many bureaucratic issues were tied up with the
issue of legitimacy in Austria.

As Logan knows >from experience, usually the Comments column on the right has
an explanation and some reference numbers when there are witnesses, changes,
etc. so I am guessing that this was not the case here. The other
possibility is that the parents had a civil marriage somewhere else, though
usually, that is referenced in the Comments column.

I know that individuals who wanted to have their surnames changed after the
death of the parent could also bring witnesses, including the mother to the
registrar to assert the father's role. I have a record for one such person.
The Comments simply recorded his appearance, the signature of the witnesses
and the explanation that his father was deceased.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Klasno #galicia

Ginger de Winter <ginger@...>
 

Dear Genners

Many thanks to all who have contributed to my knowledge of the above
town. It's great to fill in the gaps.

Ginger de Winter
London


Re: galicia digest: July 28, 2004 #galicia

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Klasno is Wieliczka, 15 km Aw of Krakow. Till the end of WW1 this region
belonged to Austria, and since then - to Poland. The Jewish so called
"traditional" name of all this region was, and still is - Western
Galicia.
If you need more information contact me.
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem

(MODERATOR NOTE: End of thread)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Klasno #galicia

Ginger de Winter <ginger@...>
 

Dear Genners

Many thanks to all who have contributed to my knowledge of the above
town. It's great to fill in the gaps.

Ginger de Winter
London


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: galicia digest: July 28, 2004 #galicia

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Klasno is Wieliczka, 15 km Aw of Krakow. Till the end of WW1 this region
belonged to Austria, and since then - to Poland. The Jewish so called
"traditional" name of all this region was, and still is - Western
Galicia.
If you need more information contact me.
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem

(MODERATOR NOTE: End of thread)


Re: Klasno #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi,

Klasno used to be Wieliczka (near Krakow) suburb.
It has been incorportated since within Wieliczka, Krakow Province.


Best,


Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Canada

----- Original Message -----
Can someone please tell me where 'Klasno, Austria' is and in what
Gubernia. I presume that 'Austria' means 'Galicia' in the 1880s.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Klasno #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi,

Klasno used to be Wieliczka (near Krakow) suburb.
It has been incorportated since within Wieliczka, Krakow Province.


Best,


Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Canada

----- Original Message -----
Can someone please tell me where 'Klasno, Austria' is and in what
Gubernia. I presume that 'Austria' means 'Galicia' in the 1880s.


Taglines and Shoemakers from Slutsk #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

By putting a tagline about what we are looking for in our own researches, we
get the neatest responses >from others in the SIG. I mentioned (for the first
time yesterday and already got 10 emails) that I was looking for details on
shoemakers in the Slutsk area. I was especially pleased to see a new query
about bricklayers following the same thought, but others wanted details
about what I had in mind.

It occurred to me that "shoemaker" is a trade that requires apprenticeship;
in my family seems to be an occupation shared by in-laws, and may have
enough practitioners in a given "large" city like Slutsk or Minsk, to even
have their own shul. It also is a tool intensive trade which means that when
we get to Russian records we may find the government newspapers posting tax
records and probate records for people in these occupations. In the US I
have found that probate seemed to have been necessary to divide up the shop
equipment equitably.

I don't know anything about shoemakers in the area yet. I thought I would
start collecting data and see where it takes us. I am going to hunt through
the occupations on Ellis Island immigrants >from Minsk guberniya and see what
I can find. I will be happy to share what I find on the SIG board or to
individuals directly as they prefer.

So help me here. Did your person make or sell shoes? If he just sold them,
where did he get his stock? Did he change occupations when came to US? Did
he have family in the same business? Any in-laws in the business with other
names we can track? Did he come to the US with any tradesman's tools? Do you
have a picture of him, if at sometime we create a "shoemaker directory" for
the area? Any thoughts on other info that should be in the database? How
often and where should we post the updates to this info?

Deborah Glassman
PILNICK, GEFTER, MALOWITSKY in Belarus; ZABARSKA, FRIEDMAN, SOLOMON,
NEIFELD, KLEIMAN, ZHUROFSKY in Ukraine; CHAIT, TUCKER in Lithuania and the
towns of Lyakhovitchi and Slutsk (in Belarus) and Ostropol, Cymbalivka,
Bralov, Cherkassy, Chigirin in the Ukraine. And shoemakers in the Slutsk
area!


Belarus SIG #Belarus Taglines and Shoemakers from Slutsk #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

By putting a tagline about what we are looking for in our own researches, we
get the neatest responses >from others in the SIG. I mentioned (for the first
time yesterday and already got 10 emails) that I was looking for details on
shoemakers in the Slutsk area. I was especially pleased to see a new query
about bricklayers following the same thought, but others wanted details
about what I had in mind.

It occurred to me that "shoemaker" is a trade that requires apprenticeship;
in my family seems to be an occupation shared by in-laws, and may have
enough practitioners in a given "large" city like Slutsk or Minsk, to even
have their own shul. It also is a tool intensive trade which means that when
we get to Russian records we may find the government newspapers posting tax
records and probate records for people in these occupations. In the US I
have found that probate seemed to have been necessary to divide up the shop
equipment equitably.

I don't know anything about shoemakers in the area yet. I thought I would
start collecting data and see where it takes us. I am going to hunt through
the occupations on Ellis Island immigrants >from Minsk guberniya and see what
I can find. I will be happy to share what I find on the SIG board or to
individuals directly as they prefer.

So help me here. Did your person make or sell shoes? If he just sold them,
where did he get his stock? Did he change occupations when came to US? Did
he have family in the same business? Any in-laws in the business with other
names we can track? Did he come to the US with any tradesman's tools? Do you
have a picture of him, if at sometime we create a "shoemaker directory" for
the area? Any thoughts on other info that should be in the database? How
often and where should we post the updates to this info?

Deborah Glassman
PILNICK, GEFTER, MALOWITSKY in Belarus; ZABARSKA, FRIEDMAN, SOLOMON,
NEIFELD, KLEIMAN, ZHUROFSKY in Ukraine; CHAIT, TUCKER in Lithuania and the
towns of Lyakhovitchi and Slutsk (in Belarus) and Ostropol, Cymbalivka,
Bralov, Cherkassy, Chigirin in the Ukraine. And shoemakers in the Slutsk
area!