Date   

Nazi Destruction of Tsirin #general

Allen Saxe <absaxe@...>
 

I would like to learn the date and year of the
Nazi destruction of Tsirin.

Allen B. Saxe
Charlotte
absaxe@...


other ways of searching the Indiana death index #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

I am searching for someone on the Indiana death index who
we cannot find. I suspect her name has been entered
incorrectly, as I have a newspaper article reporting her
death on Dec 19, 1885. Her husband, Samuel Steinberg, and
she died in an accident. I have obtained his death
certificate, but there is nothing for a Mrs Steinberg.
How else could I search? I would love to have the names
of all the old ladies who died between Dec 18 and 25 for
example, and see if there is someone else who might fit
the bill. Or, I would like to be able to search by
addresses. Is either of these options possible? How
could I do it? All advice welcome.

Kind regards

Annemarie Jutel
Dunedin, NZ

Researching:
DROZDOWITZ/DROZDOWICZ/DROZDOW/DROSDOWITZ of Plonsk,
Zakroczym, Chicago, Ogden (UT), Indianapolis and New
York. GOLDSTEIN Marijampol, HIRSCHLER Manheim and
Hessheim, MANHEIM Ottensoos, San Francisco, KAHN
Hannover, San Francisco LOEB Strasbourg, San Francisco
and STEINBERG Marijampole(?), Louisville, KY


Albert EINSTEIN's genealogy #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Albert EINSTEIN was born in Ulm (Germany) on 14 March 1879, son of
Hermann EINSTEIN and Pauline KOCH. Where is it possible to obtain
more information concerning his genealogy, especially his mother's
and the KOCH family ?
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen other ways of searching the Indiana death index #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

I am searching for someone on the Indiana death index who
we cannot find. I suspect her name has been entered
incorrectly, as I have a newspaper article reporting her
death on Dec 19, 1885. Her husband, Samuel Steinberg, and
she died in an accident. I have obtained his death
certificate, but there is nothing for a Mrs Steinberg.
How else could I search? I would love to have the names
of all the old ladies who died between Dec 18 and 25 for
example, and see if there is someone else who might fit
the bill. Or, I would like to be able to search by
addresses. Is either of these options possible? How
could I do it? All advice welcome.

Kind regards

Annemarie Jutel
Dunedin, NZ

Researching:
DROZDOWITZ/DROZDOWICZ/DROZDOW/DROSDOWITZ of Plonsk,
Zakroczym, Chicago, Ogden (UT), Indianapolis and New
York. GOLDSTEIN Marijampol, HIRSCHLER Manheim and
Hessheim, MANHEIM Ottensoos, San Francisco, KAHN
Hannover, San Francisco LOEB Strasbourg, San Francisco
and STEINBERG Marijampole(?), Louisville, KY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nazi Destruction of Tsirin #general

Allen Saxe <absaxe@...>
 

I would like to learn the date and year of the
Nazi destruction of Tsirin.

Allen B. Saxe
Charlotte
absaxe@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Albert EINSTEIN's genealogy #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Albert EINSTEIN was born in Ulm (Germany) on 14 March 1879, son of
Hermann EINSTEIN and Pauline KOCH. Where is it possible to obtain
more information concerning his genealogy, especially his mother's
and the KOCH family ?
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


The shtetl of Shavli a/k/a Siauliai in Lithuania #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

I agree with Naomi Fatouros that the shtetl in Lithuania about which
Phyliss Bosworth had inquired probably was "Siauliai," a name which
has used many spelling variations, including "Shavli."

In English, both of these spellings would be pronounced "Shawley."
Remember that the Slavic letter "V" is pronounced "W" in English, and
the Slavic "W" is pronounced as the English "V."

The JewishGen site has extensive information about Siauliai. According
to reports, the Nazis performed excruciating medical experiments on
the children of the Siauliai ghetto, bestial even by Nazi standards.

Judy Segal
New York City USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The shtetl of Shavli a/k/a Siauliai in Lithuania #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

I agree with Naomi Fatouros that the shtetl in Lithuania about which
Phyliss Bosworth had inquired probably was "Siauliai," a name which
has used many spelling variations, including "Shavli."

In English, both of these spellings would be pronounced "Shawley."
Remember that the Slavic letter "V" is pronounced "W" in English, and
the Slavic "W" is pronounced as the English "V."

The JewishGen site has extensive information about Siauliai. According
to reports, the Nazis performed excruciating medical experiments on
the children of the Siauliai ghetto, bestial even by Nazi standards.

Judy Segal
New York City USA


Re: Siauliai (not Slauliai or Sauliai) #general

Arnold Davidson <arnoldbd@...>
 

At 01:00 AM 08/18/2004 NFatouros@... wrote:

On Aug.15, 04 Phyllis Bosworth (phylboz@...) said she was

<<Looking for information on Slauliai, Lithuania. Is it the same as present
day Silale, Lithuania.>>

I don't know how the "l" crept in after the "S" but I am quite sure that she
is interested in Sauliai, also known as Shav, Schaulen, Shavel, Shaulia,
Siavliai, and Schawli, and Saula, according to Nancy Schoenburg and Stuart
Schoenburg 'Lithuanian Jewish Communities."
Actually, it is not difficult to see how the "l" crept in. The town in
question is now known by its present name - Siauliai. The "i" after the
"S" can easily be misread as an "l".

Arnold Davidson
Boynton Beach, FL
arnoldbd@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Siauliai (not Slauliai or Sauliai) #general

Arnold Davidson <arnoldbd@...>
 

At 01:00 AM 08/18/2004 NFatouros@... wrote:

On Aug.15, 04 Phyllis Bosworth (phylboz@...) said she was

<<Looking for information on Slauliai, Lithuania. Is it the same as present
day Silale, Lithuania.>>

I don't know how the "l" crept in after the "S" but I am quite sure that she
is interested in Sauliai, also known as Shav, Schaulen, Shavel, Shaulia,
Siavliai, and Schawli, and Saula, according to Nancy Schoenburg and Stuart
Schoenburg 'Lithuanian Jewish Communities."
Actually, it is not difficult to see how the "l" crept in. The town in
question is now known by its present name - Siauliai. The "i" after the
"S" can easily be misread as an "l".

Arnold Davidson
Boynton Beach, FL
arnoldbd@...


Birth certificate #belarus

boris Bayevsky
 

Recently I asked Belarus SIG for advice where to go with the request for the
copy of my late (died in Belarus in 1981) father's birth certificate.
David Fox suggested me to contact the Consulate General of the Republic of
Belarus, http://www.belarusconsul.org/
They have on their web site the council affairs chapter, where they describe
the rules how to request archival documents. But all this information
available only in Russian version. (Follow the link below)

http://www.belarusconsul.org/rus/doc_request/doc_duplicate.htm

I translated just few statements, because of their significance:

Issuing copies of birth certificates of deceased persons is prohibited

Death certificates can be requested by the relatives of deceased or by
juridical person.

Regards,
Boris Bayevsky (Researcher # 26891)
Tallahassee, Florida
Researching Bayevsky, Rachlenko, Rubinshtein, Epshtein, >from Gomel
(Belarus), Kiev, Berdichev (Ukraine), Vikhvatinets (Bessarabiya)



David Fox wrote:

Suggest that you contact the Consulate General of the Republic of Belarus.
Here is the contact information. Please post a message to the SIG
discussion group to report back on the results you get >from contacting
them.

Address
708 Third Avenue,21st Floor, New York,NY 10017

Location
3rd Avenue & 44th Street

Telephone
(1-212) 682-5392

Fax
(1-212) 682-5491

E-mail
gcny@...

Subway
Grand Central Terminal Station

Office Hours
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

Good luck.

Dave
--
David Fox


Belarus SIG #Belarus Birth certificate #belarus

boris Bayevsky
 

Recently I asked Belarus SIG for advice where to go with the request for the
copy of my late (died in Belarus in 1981) father's birth certificate.
David Fox suggested me to contact the Consulate General of the Republic of
Belarus, http://www.belarusconsul.org/
They have on their web site the council affairs chapter, where they describe
the rules how to request archival documents. But all this information
available only in Russian version. (Follow the link below)

http://www.belarusconsul.org/rus/doc_request/doc_duplicate.htm

I translated just few statements, because of their significance:

Issuing copies of birth certificates of deceased persons is prohibited

Death certificates can be requested by the relatives of deceased or by
juridical person.

Regards,
Boris Bayevsky (Researcher # 26891)
Tallahassee, Florida
Researching Bayevsky, Rachlenko, Rubinshtein, Epshtein, >from Gomel
(Belarus), Kiev, Berdichev (Ukraine), Vikhvatinets (Bessarabiya)



David Fox wrote:

Suggest that you contact the Consulate General of the Republic of Belarus.
Here is the contact information. Please post a message to the SIG
discussion group to report back on the results you get >from contacting
them.

Address
708 Third Avenue,21st Floor, New York,NY 10017

Location
3rd Avenue & 44th Street

Telephone
(1-212) 682-5392

Fax
(1-212) 682-5491

E-mail
gcny@...

Subway
Grand Central Terminal Station

Office Hours
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

Good luck.

Dave
--
David Fox


David Horodok Vital Records #belarus

brkaye@...
 

In response to Darlene Bregman Ehrenberg’s question about
David Horodok birth records, the David Horodok web page, located at
http://davidhorodok.netfirms.com/ contains English translation of birth
and death records >from 1886-1892. The Family History Library (LDS
genealogy library) has microfilms of Jewish vital records for David
Horodok >from 1874-1910. The records are in Russian and Hebrew. The URL for
the Family History Library is http://www.familysearch.org/ and for their
catalog (search under David Gorodok) is
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp.

Unfortunatly, as far as I know ,there are no Jewish birth records for
1860. The David Horodok web page also lists David Horodok Jews murdered in
the Holocaust.

Brian Kaye
Piedmont, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus David Horodok Vital Records #belarus

brkaye@...
 

In response to Darlene Bregman Ehrenberg’s question about
David Horodok birth records, the David Horodok web page, located at
http://davidhorodok.netfirms.com/ contains English translation of birth
and death records >from 1886-1892. The Family History Library (LDS
genealogy library) has microfilms of Jewish vital records for David
Horodok >from 1874-1910. The records are in Russian and Hebrew. The URL for
the Family History Library is http://www.familysearch.org/ and for their
catalog (search under David Gorodok) is
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp.

Unfortunatly, as far as I know ,there are no Jewish birth records for
1860. The David Horodok web page also lists David Horodok Jews murdered in
the Holocaust.

Brian Kaye
Piedmont, CA


Silale, Lithuania #general

Chuck Weinstein <cmw521@...>
 

According to "Where Once We Walked", Silale, Lithuania is 87 km SW of
Siauliai. In Yiddish, it was known as Sallel or Shilel. Siauliai, known as
Shavel, etc., was a more important Jewish center, but there was a
significant Jewish community in Silale, as well.

Chuck Weinstein in Commack, NY
cmw521@...

<<Looking for information on Slauliai, Lithuania. Is it the
same as present
day Silale, Lithuania.>>

I don't know how the "l" crept in after the "S" but I am quite
sure that she
is interested in Sauliai, also known as Shav, Schaulen,
Shavel, Shaulia,
Siavliai, and Schawli, and Saula, according to Nancy
Schoenburg and Stuart
Schoenburg 'Lithuanian Jewish Communities." The Schoenburgs
devote several
pages to this city and they include names of its rabbis,
community leaders,
and "natives" of some prominence.

I haven't seen the spelling "Silale"anywhere but in Ms.
Bosworth's message.
Perhaps it is the sounding out of the city's name as she may
have heard it or
seen it written in some document or on a ship manifest.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Silale, Lithuania #general

Chuck Weinstein <cmw521@...>
 

According to "Where Once We Walked", Silale, Lithuania is 87 km SW of
Siauliai. In Yiddish, it was known as Sallel or Shilel. Siauliai, known as
Shavel, etc., was a more important Jewish center, but there was a
significant Jewish community in Silale, as well.

Chuck Weinstein in Commack, NY
cmw521@...

<<Looking for information on Slauliai, Lithuania. Is it the
same as present
day Silale, Lithuania.>>

I don't know how the "l" crept in after the "S" but I am quite
sure that she
is interested in Sauliai, also known as Shav, Schaulen,
Shavel, Shaulia,
Siavliai, and Schawli, and Saula, according to Nancy
Schoenburg and Stuart
Schoenburg 'Lithuanian Jewish Communities." The Schoenburgs
devote several
pages to this city and they include names of its rabbis,
community leaders,
and "natives" of some prominence.

I haven't seen the spelling "Silale"anywhere but in Ms.
Bosworth's message.
Perhaps it is the sounding out of the city's name as she may
have heard it or
seen it written in some document or on a ship manifest.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana


Name Correspondences, was: Hebrew names for Victor Maxwell #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

Within the Jewish legal literature, there is an entire genre
of books known as "Shemot Gittin" (literally, "Names in Divorce
Documents.") "Halachah" (Jewish law) places a premium on the
correct identification and spelling of the husband and wife's
names in a "Get" (divorce document). Accordingly, many medieval
and later authorities researched the origins of nicknames and
wrote books about them. These books can be useful sources for
discovering the origin of Yiddish, Russian, Polish, Ladino and
Arabic nicknames. Of course, these books are always in Hebrew
and require some ability to read halachic literature.
I hope this helps someone.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring Maryland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name Correspondences, was: Hebrew names for Victor Maxwell #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

Within the Jewish legal literature, there is an entire genre
of books known as "Shemot Gittin" (literally, "Names in Divorce
Documents.") "Halachah" (Jewish law) places a premium on the
correct identification and spelling of the husband and wife's
names in a "Get" (divorce document). Accordingly, many medieval
and later authorities researched the origins of nicknames and
wrote books about them. These books can be useful sources for
discovering the origin of Yiddish, Russian, Polish, Ladino and
Arabic nicknames. Of course, these books are always in Hebrew
and require some ability to read halachic literature.
I hope this helps someone.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring Maryland


Re: Seeking Hebrew names for Victor Maxwell #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <uViCr8LlbtmJ-pn2-XgzWybWcQe52@poblano>,
Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...> wrote:
On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 04:13:21 UTC, israel@... (Robert Israel) opined:
X-No-archive: yes
<MBernet@...> wrote:
Occasionally, according to Beider,
Avigdor was a kinnuy for Moshe (Moses).
I don't know if Beider mentions the reason for this kinnuy:
according to the Bible, the original Moshe was given that name by
Pharaoh's daughter. But logically his parents must have already given
him a name, which the Bible neglects to mention. According to midrash,
he had seven (or in other versions 10) such names, and one of them
was Avigdor. See e.g.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=830&letter=M
Where do you find any of this, in the Bible or in the Encyclopedia? The
explanation you give, if true, is certainly not off-topic, for it would bear
on name tracing in recent generations, for example. But I don't see it in
either Breshit or the article to which you refer. It would be well, when
basing an argument on "the Bible" to give a reference to chapter and verse,
so that other users can verify it and make use of the information. I, for
one, would be very interested in knowing the basis for a connection between
"Moshe" and "Avigdor".
In that Jewish Encyclopedia article I referred to, see the paragraph
entitled "His Bringing up."

If you meant actually to refer to midrashim, it is hard to take them
seriously as unsupported statements of what name or names Moshe was called
by. One has to distinguish between exegetic Talmudic explanations and
Biblical ones coming out of an attempt to record "history" as it was
perceived in pre-dispersion Israel.
I am not claiming that the midrashim should be taken as literally true.
It wouldn't bother me even if you don't want to believe that Moshe existed
at all. All I'm saying is that when people (not in biblical times, but
perhaps a few hundred years ago) used Avigdor as a kinnuy for Moshe, these
midrashim are the source for that connection.

Robert Israel
israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Hebrew names for Victor Maxwell #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <uViCr8LlbtmJ-pn2-XgzWybWcQe52@poblano>,
Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...> wrote:
On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 04:13:21 UTC, israel@... (Robert Israel) opined:
X-No-archive: yes
<MBernet@...> wrote:
Occasionally, according to Beider,
Avigdor was a kinnuy for Moshe (Moses).
I don't know if Beider mentions the reason for this kinnuy:
according to the Bible, the original Moshe was given that name by
Pharaoh's daughter. But logically his parents must have already given
him a name, which the Bible neglects to mention. According to midrash,
he had seven (or in other versions 10) such names, and one of them
was Avigdor. See e.g.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=830&letter=M
Where do you find any of this, in the Bible or in the Encyclopedia? The
explanation you give, if true, is certainly not off-topic, for it would bear
on name tracing in recent generations, for example. But I don't see it in
either Breshit or the article to which you refer. It would be well, when
basing an argument on "the Bible" to give a reference to chapter and verse,
so that other users can verify it and make use of the information. I, for
one, would be very interested in knowing the basis for a connection between
"Moshe" and "Avigdor".
In that Jewish Encyclopedia article I referred to, see the paragraph
entitled "His Bringing up."

If you meant actually to refer to midrashim, it is hard to take them
seriously as unsupported statements of what name or names Moshe was called
by. One has to distinguish between exegetic Talmudic explanations and
Biblical ones coming out of an attempt to record "history" as it was
perceived in pre-dispersion Israel.
I am not claiming that the midrashim should be taken as literally true.
It wouldn't bother me even if you don't want to believe that Moshe existed
at all. All I'm saying is that when people (not in biblical times, but
perhaps a few hundred years ago) used Avigdor as a kinnuy for Moshe, these
midrashim are the source for that connection.

Robert Israel
israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada