Date   

names on tombstone #translation

Malka
 

Hello,

The top one –

Here lies or here is buried (two letter abbreviation on top)

Yosef son of Tuvia Ha’levi

Below-

Rachel daughter of Shmu’el Ha’levi,

Shalom, Malka Chosnek

 


Petitioning Records from Pilgrim State Psychiatric Hospital #records #usa

DBarany
 

Dear Colleagues and Fellow Time Travelers

This is a follow on to an earlier post about my Grandaunt. I have confirmation that she was a patient at the Pilgrim Psychiatric Hospital in New York. She was there from about 1934-  mid 1940s. She likely died there and that is why I can not get her death date. 

My understanding is that patient records are sealed for 100 years including her death certificate and burial location.
Here are my questions

1) Does 100 years from the time of admission OR the age of the patient? (She was born about 1897 in Senna Russia)
2) Can I petition for the records to be released? 

3) If I can petition, what wording would be helpful in my letter to the medical records review board? (I am a psychologist - would that help?)
4) If she died while at the hospital, did they bury her on the premises? Are those documents sealed as well?

This is a good puzzle to solve. 

Thank you all for your generosity

Elef Hodot
Deborah

--
Deborah Barany
deborahbarany@...


Re: Hebrew name translation #translation

DBarany
 

Dear Jocelyn,

Do you know your husband's Hebrew name? If you can sound it out I can help you with the Hebrew and send you an email with the Hebrew text.

His name would be.  Tobias ben Yosef Halevi

If he is named for his grandfather your husband's name might be:  Tuviah ben Yosef HaLevi

So you are correct about flipping the names. 

Depending on your family tradition some add the mother's name as well. For example

Tuviah Ben Yosef v Rachel HaLevi

I am happy to help if needs be

May you be comforted among the mourners of Zion,
B'Shalom
Deborah

--
Deborah Barany
deborahbarany@...


Polish record translation needed #translation

Hannah Niva Glick
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish from JRI-Poland.org, for which I need a translation pkease. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99617
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Hannah Niva Glick


Khutoryansky, gutaransky, ransky Anna from zvenigorodkae Cherkassy district ukraine. #ukraine

Bari Hochfeld
 

If anyone has any information on Zev Schlomo Gauchfeld/Gochfeld/Hochfeld father of Morris Hochfeld and Anna (Channah) Khutoryansky please share that with me.  Zvenigorodkae is their village of origin.   They married in Brooklyn, New York.  Thanks Bari Hochfeld


Viewmate Translations Yiddish Russian #translation #yiddish

srg100@...
 

I've posted postcards in Yiddish and Russian for which I would like translations. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99642
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99643
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99644
Please respond via the forms provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
--
Shoshanah Glickman
UK


ViewMate translation request - Polish #translation

E Iahav <eliahav@...>
 


I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99621
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
Eli Iahav


Looking for descendents of Paul and Rosa Stone, originally from Bedzin. #poland

Roger Lampert
 

Rosa Stone (not her original name) came to the USA from Poland in the early 1910s.  I am a descendent of her twin brother. Two of her sisters and their families died in the holocaust. I do not know if Paul came with her and if so, what his original name was in Poland. I think they had five children. If anyone knows anything about Paul and Rosa (Rosie?), please could they reply to this message.

 

Roger Lampert


Re: Hebrew name translation #translation

Diane Jacobs
 

His states Yosef Ben Tuvia or Tobia Halevi

Hers is Ruchel bat Shmuel Halevi


Hope this helps.
Diane Jacobs


On Aug 21, 2022, at 2:02 PM, Jocelyn Keene via groups.jewishgen.org <jbkeene=yahoo.com@...> wrote:

My husband just died and I am starting to think about a gravestone.  Unfortunately, I have never seen his Hebrew name written anywhere.  I searched for the gravestones of his grandfather (no Hebrew on it) and GG-grandfather (haven’t found him yet) because he was named after them.  But then I realized that his father’s name would do because my husband’s name would be just the opposite - i.e., Tobias son of Joseph instead of Joseph son of Tobias.  So I am attaching his father’s Hebrew name from his gravestone in Bushey Cemetery, Watford, England in hopes that someone will tell me what it says transliterated from Hebrew but also in Hebrew letters so I know what to tell the gravestone engraver.  I don’t read Hebrew at all.  Does it say halevi at the end?   I have also attached his mother’s Hebrew name because I don’t know at all what her Hebrew name was. 
 
Thank you,
Jocelyn Keene
Pasadena, California, USA
 
Joseph Phillips Hebrew name.jpegIris Phillips Hebrew name.jpeg

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Re: Brick wall regarding paper trail going dry in NY #records #usa

Diane Jacobs
 

One thing comes to mind, since her last residence was Scarsdale NY ,place I lived in for many years, the reference librarian at the Scarsdale Public Library could do a lookup for you in the Scarsdale Inquirer , the local paper for an obituary and you could also check The NY Times which can be obtained using Proquest at your local library for the same info .
Residing in Scarsdale , she could have died at the While Plains hospital in White Plains NY which is just a few minutes drive. 

Also keep in mind that although she had a 
10583 zip code, she could have actually been in  New Rochelle or Yonkers NY as some 
Residences there have Scarsdale mailing addresses.

Good luck.

Diane Jacobs

On Aug 21, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Renee Steinig <genmaven@...> wrote:


Wendy, in your inquiry about sisters Anna Kelmansky Rabinovitch and May (or Mae) Kelmansky, you wrote that  <<I actually found a record I think was Anna's, indicating she passed away in 1972 in Westchester (as Rabinovitch, which tells me she didn't remarry), but I think I have to purchase the Social Security record to know for sure it is her. (I also still do not know where she is buried.)>>

I assume that the record you referred to is this listing in the Social Security Death Index:

Name: Anna Rabinovitch
Social Security Number: 092-26-2965
Birth Date: 6 Apr 1886
Issue Year: 1951
Issue State: New York
Last Residence: 10583, Scarsdale, Westchester, New York, USA
Death Date: Oct 1972

Good chance that she's the right Anna as the birth date matches her naturalization record.

A reminder: The location shown in the SSDI is the decedent's last residence, which is not necessarily the place of death. Someone residing in Scarsdale could easily have died in nearby New York City, in which case the record would not be filed with NY State, or elsewhere. I've also seen instances where the zip code isn't even the decedent's, but that of a family member to whose address the monthly Social Security check was mailed, pre-direct deposit.

Also wondering...  

Could the Anna Rabinovitch listed in the SSDI be the same one who is buried at Baron Hirsch Cemetery?

Name: Anna Rabinovitch
Death Date: 14 Oct 1972
Burial Place: Staten Island, New York, United States
Comments: wife, sister, aunt
Other Comments: Erste Jablonower Lodge No. 477 I.O.B.A., Section E
Cemetery: Baron Hirsch Cemetery
Cemetery Address: Richmond Road
Cemetery Burials: 212
Cemetery Comments: Cemetery is badly overgrown with poison ivy, briars and other vines. Some graves are toppled or inaccessible. Contact John Hoenig for more information, hoenig@... Landsmanshaft Info: Yabluniv, Ukraine (was Jablonow, Galicia)

I realize that Anna wasn't a "Galitzianer," but that doesn't rule out burial in a Galician landsmanshaft section. I'd want to try to get a photo of the grave to see the Hebrew patronymic that's hopefully there. (Emphasis on the word "try," because, as the note on JOWBR indicates, many stones at Baron Hirsch are inaccessible.)

If you do send to the NY State Dept. of Health for a death record, wait a few months -- i.e. until 50 years after filing -- to be eligible for an uncertified copy of the record. https://www.health.ny.gov/vital_records/genealogy.htm

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

On Sun, Aug 21, 2022 at 11:21 AM Robert Hanna <robert.hanna41@...> wrote:

Anna's death certificate should have the cemetery where she is buried.  You can get the certificate from the NYS Dept of Health in Albany NY.



--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Hebrew name translation #translation

Jocelyn Keene
 

My husband just died and I am starting to think about a gravestone.  Unfortunately, I have never seen his Hebrew name written anywhere.  I searched for the gravestones of his grandfather (no Hebrew on it) and GG-grandfather (haven’t found him yet) because he was named after them.  But then I realized that his father’s name would do because my husband’s name would be just the opposite - i.e., Tobias son of Joseph instead of Joseph son of Tobias.  So I am attaching his father’s Hebrew name from his gravestone in Bushey Cemetery, Watford, England in hopes that someone will tell me what it says transliterated from Hebrew but also in Hebrew letters so I know what to tell the gravestone engraver.  I don’t read Hebrew at all.  Does it say halevi at the end?   I have also attached his mother’s Hebrew name because I don’t know at all what her Hebrew name was. 
 
Thank you,
Jocelyn Keene
Pasadena, California, USA
 


Re: INTRO - researching families MEYER and KAUFMANN from Mulheim an der Ruhr #germany

Robert Weinberg <weinberg@...>
 

Dear Mr. Meyer, I have on my Stammbaum Else Helene Kaufmann, daughter of Gustav Kaufmann from Mühlheim. she was born in M. 6 Jan 1887. she married Adolf Jonas, born 1872 in Schermbeck. They fled  1939 to the Hague but were caught by the Nazis. He died 9 Sep 1942 in Driebergen.  she was arrested 8 Oct 1943 and deported to Westerbork and then Bergen Belsen where she perished 3 Mar 1945. Their daughater Thea Amalie, born 1909 in M. marrried Simon Sally Daube, born 1897 in Mannheim. They were arrested 8 Oct 1943 in Driebergen NL and were deported 123 Sep 1944 to Bergen-Belsen but survived and emigrate to the US.  Their son Ernst/Ernesto lived in Mexico City and died there 1967. Does this help?  Best wishes, mit freundlichem Gruß, Bob Weinberg


NY Museums Required to Disclose Artwork Looted by Nazis #announcements #holocaust

Jan Meisels Allen
 

CNN reports, museums in New York will be required to disclose which artworks were stolen in Europe during the Nazi era due to new legislation signed into law on August 10 by NY Governor Kathy Hochul. The law is A.3719A /S117A (https://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?default_fld=&leg_video=&bn=A03719&term=2021&Summary=Y). . In a NY State governor reports it says, “the Nazis looted some 600,000 paintings from Jews, enriching the Third Reich and eliminating all vestiges of Jewish identity and culture. Museums across New York display this stolen art with no recognition of or transparency around their origins, and this legislation will require museums to disclose information on the history of these stolen art pieces.”  

See: https://www.dfs.ny.gov/reports_and_publications/press_releases/pr202208101

 

To read the CNN.style article see: https://www.cnn.com/style/article/new-york-art-museum-nazis-trnd/index.html

 

Thank you to Phil Goldfarb, JewishGen for informing us about this.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: The Weekly News Nosh from JewishGen August 21, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates

Debbie
 

This is great! Many thanks.
Ok to share w non members...hoping some will be inspired to join/ follow one or more sites/groups??( I belong to a small local group of retirees - florida- interested in Jewish culture.)
Tx

On Sun, Aug 21, 2022 at 12:33 PM, Phil Goldfarb
<phil.goldfarb@...> wrote:

The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor

Date: August 28, 2022 

“A Family Without The Knowledge Of Their Past History, Origin And Culture Is Like A Tree Without Roots”

 

I apologize in advance as this Weekly News Nosh is a little longer this week as it contains stories from two weeks as opposed to a single week as I have been on vacation.

Enjoy this week’s News Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@...

 

1.       JewishGen Discussion Group (JGDG) surpasses 20,000 members! The JewishGen Discussion Group in August surpassed the 20,000-member mark with 1,165 new members being added this past year. There has also been over 10,500 new posts approved this year by our three volunteer moderators: Jessica Feinstein (U.K.), Stephen Jones (U.S.), and Lead Moderator Phil Goldfarb (U.S.). If you have not yet searched the JGDG archives, there are over 670,800+ messages going back to 1998 that can be searched by names, towns, almost any subject or topic and can be a terrific, untapped, genealogical resource for you. To join the JGDG go to: main@... | Home To search the 670,800+ messages, once you sign in, simply go to “messages” and then “search.” For help go to: support@...

 

2.       JewishGen Announces Viewmate Update. JewishGen recently updated Viewmate to make the main page run much faster. Viewmate is a service where researchers post images, they want information about - translations, or other information - and volunteers help them out. To read more see: Viewmate Runs Faster (jewishgen.org)

 

3.       The 2022 Annual IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) report. The Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) had a busy year monitoring and addressing

issues affecting access to public records.  From Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, these are highlights of what PRAMC worked on since last year’s report. Go to: PRAMC.Annual.Report.2022.pdf (iajgs.org)

 

4.       Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly. A free new feature on the MyHeritage mobile app that lets you easily tag multiple photos of the same individual in one go. Photo Tagger makes organizing your family photos easier and accelerates your productivity, enabling you to tag hundreds of photos in minutes. Read more from MyHeritage: Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly - MyHeritage Blog

 

5.       Legacy Family Tree Webinars is hosting their third annual Webtember: a free, month-long online genealogy conference. Every Friday in September, Legacy Family Tree Webinars will host multiple live and pre-recorded webinars with expert speakers on a wide variety of family history and DNA topics. A total of 31 webinars will take place, and they'll all be available to view for free until the end of the month. Go to: Upcoming Webinars - Legacy Family Tree Webinars to view the full schedule and register for sessions.

 

6.       MyHeritage Adds New Records in July. They added 11 collections with 15.4 million historical records. The collections originate from Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Chile, France, and Sweden. Most of the collections include high-quality images of the original records. To read more about specific records go to: Historical Record Collections Added in July 2022 - MyHeritage Blog

 

7.       Findmypast Releases Tree Search. Tree Search will help you: Search for ancestors you have in common with others, gather information from other members’ research and privately message that member, validate your own research, and help other Findmypast members to find their family stories. Read more from Findmypast: What is Tree Search? - Help and FAQs | findmypast.com

 

8.       Findmypast Adds almost Two Million Records for North of England. See their press release about these records: Get lost in 1.8 million new records across the North of England | Blog | findmypast.com

 

9.       Vatican Archives Opened: Desperate Letters from Jews During WWII Revealed. The virtual reproduction of a collection preserving the requests for help addressed to Pope Pius XII by Jews from all over Europe after the beginning of Nazi-Fascist persecution is now accessible to all. It consists of a total of 170 volumes, or nearly 40,000 files. Only 70% of the total material will be initially available but will later be supplemented with the final volumes currently being prepared. Requests were addressed to the Pope from all over Europe, with the aim of providing all the help possible. Requests could be made to obtain visas or passports to expatriate, find asylum, reunify families, obtain liberation from detention and transfers from one concentration camp to another, receive news regarding deported people, supplies of food or clothing, financial support, spiritual support and much more. Each of these requests constituted a case which, once processed, was destined for storage in a documentary series entitled “Ebrei”. It contains more than 2,700 cases with requests for help almost always for entire families or groups of people. Thousands of people persecuted for their membership to the Jewish religion, or for merely having “non-Aryan” ancestry, turned to the Vatican, in the knowledge that others had received help. Read more: https://momentmag.com/vatican-archives-opened-letters-from-jews-revealed/ Thank you to Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.

 

10.   New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis. The new law forms part of a package of legislation designed to honor and support Holocaust survivors. Nazis stole and confiscated hundreds of thousands of works of art during World War II, mostly from Jewish communities. The new law mandates that museums "prominently place a placard or other signage" on the artworks. This legislation allows institutions in New York to honor those whose lives were lost and whose personal possessions were stolen for profit. Artworks stolen by Nazis continue to face contentious public debates over their ownership. Read the story from CNN: New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis - CNN Style

 

11.   Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery. The findings, based on a set of ancient silver vessels, propose a new method for decoding Linear Elamite symbols. The language originates in the 5000-year-old city of Susa, in what today is southwestern Iran. An ancient urban oasis and the capital of Elam, Susa was one of the first places to use written symbols in its bustling society. Read the story from the Jerusalem Post: Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery - study - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

12.   The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust. Issachar Ber Ryback preserved the Eastern European Jewish shtetl in his art works, reaping fame in his lifetime that rivalled that of Marc Chagall. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum in Paris gives a glimpse into his world. His main claim to fame was as an artist who drew and documented the ruined Jewish villages of Eastern Europe, combining Jewish elements and Yiddish words in works that fused cubism, the Russian avant-garde style, German expressionism, and futurism. Read more about Ryback and the exhibit from Haaretz: The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust - Jewish World - Haaretz.com

 

13.   European Days of Jewish Culture Kick off September 4, 2022. European Days of Jewish Culture (EDJC) kick off September 4th, however some events are starting in August. This year’s theme is “Renewal”. See: https://jewisheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Renewal.pdf   from the National Library of Israel. The EDJC is coordinated under the auspices of the AEPJ (European Association for the Preservation and Promotion of Jewish Culture and Heritage), in partnership with the National Library of Israel. It seeks to educate about the role of Jewish heritage, culture, and history in local, regional, and Europe-wide context, among other things in order to demystify the Jewish world and promote understanding. To find events and national programs see: https://jewisheritage.org/edjc/2022-renewal   Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for passing along this story.

 

14.   Doctors in Rome invented a fake infectious disease to save Jews and keep the Nazis away: “Syndrome K,” which hits digital and VOD platforms after some Jewish film festival showings, tells that little-known, surefire story: How three doctors at a hospital in Rome shielded a group of Jews from the Nazis in 1943 and 1944 by inventing a fake infectious disease called Syndrome K. The prospect of catching the disease kept the Nazis, who were occupying Rome following the fall of Mussolini, away from the hospital. The Jews there hung on until the Allies liberated the city in June of 1944. Read more from JTA: To save Jews and keep the Nazis away, these doctors invented a fake infectious disease - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

15.   Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz honored by Vatican cardinal with Jewish ancestry. Cardinal Czerny noted that his mother’s relatives, despite their conversion to Catholicism, were also persecuted by the Nazis for having Jewish ancestry. Read the full story from JTA: Canadian cardinal with Jewish ancestry honors Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

16.   Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey. The document made by monks, narrates the history of Israel and Judah and is on public display at its former home for the first time. The double-sided sheet is made from vellum, a specially prepared animal skin, usually that of a calf – that was used for books until the rise of paper production in the later Middle Ages. The Latin text is thought to have been written around the 13th century, probably at some point between 1225 and 1250. Read the story from Jewish News: Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey | Jewish News

 

17.   Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage. Meydad Eliyahu’s researched the roots of the Cochin Jews and found that his family’s history nearly vanished when they came to Israel. ‘It’s a reminder that something was once here.’ Read the story from Haaretz: Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage - Israel News - Haaretz.com

 

18.   An artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok, Poland could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years. Excavations have begun at a large, artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok where researchers believe possibly hundreds of historic matzevot uprooted under communism from another cemetery were buried. To read more from Jewish Heritage Europe see: Poland: an artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years - Jewish Heritage Europe (jewish-heritage-europe.eu)

 

19.   Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary. Out on August 19, a new film, ‘Three Minutes – A Lengthening,’ by Dutch filmmaker Bianca Stigter, looks in depth at recovered footage of a Polish town prior to its devastation. In 1938, David Kurtz, a Polish-born Jew who came to the United States as a child, took his wife on a “grand tour” of Europe. A successful businessman, he brought along with him a brand-new movie camera. He visited Nasielsk, the small village where he had grown up. Nasielsk had a significant Jewish population (over 40 percent of the town) and a thriving community. The day he visited, people were out in full force, eager to show off due to the novelty of the camera. Read more from Times of Israel: Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary | The Times of Israel

 

20.   City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust. The International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation named the city an honorary member. The foundation is named after the Swedish diplomat Raul Wallenberg, who helped save 200,000 Jews in Budapest in 1944 by giving them protective documents, putting them in protected housing and ensuring their release from Nazi deportation trains, death marches and labor service brigades, Read the story from Jewish News Syndicate: City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust - JNS.org

 

21.   More than 4,000 people gathered at the Coney Island Amphitheater in Brooklyn for the first annual Chosen Comedy Festival, featuring Jewish comedians and musical acts. The event served as a benefit for the Ukrainian Emergency Performing Arts Fund. Read the story from The Jewish Journal: Chosen Comedy Festival in Coney Island Lives up to Hype (jewishjournal.com)

 

22.   The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of “The Kaiser of Atlantis.”  Under a perpetual shadow of death, as train after train was sent to Auschwitz, Viktor Ullmann and Peter Kien, imprisoned in the Theresienstadt Ghetto, composed a searing opera satirizing the awful reality in Europe. Both were murdered, but a suitcase filled with Ullmann's works survived to tell the story of the human spirit’s triumph over death. Read the story from the National Library of Israel: The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of "The Kaiser of Atlantis" (nli.org.il)

 

23.   In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a farming village founded in 1882, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive. With museums boasting lifelike reproductions of life in the olden days and a seemingly endless number of historically significant sites, one of Israel’s oldest towns is must-see. Read the story from The Times of Israel: In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive | The Times of Israel

 

24.   Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River. Over 20 explosive-laden warships resurface in eastern Serbia near the river port town of Prahovo, blocking shipping and posing danger to fishing industry. The Danube is at its lowest levels in almost a century. Hundreds of ships belonging to Nazi Germany’s Black Sea fleet were sunk in the river as they retreated from advancing Soviet forces in 1944. Read the story from The Times of Israel: Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River | The Times of Israel

 

25.   People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now. Did you know that a thriving Jewish community has existed for centuries in Gibraltar, the British territory at the tip of the Iberian peninsula? Even when Jews were excluded from Spain, tiny Gibraltar was home to a prosperous Sephardic community that lived in harmony with their non-Jewish neighbors. Read the story from Aish: People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now - aish.com

 

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Re: Brick wall regarding paper trail going dry in NY #records #usa

Renee Steinig
 

Wendy, in your inquiry about sisters Anna Kelmansky Rabinovitch and May (or Mae) Kelmansky, you wrote that  <<I actually found a record I think was Anna's, indicating she passed away in 1972 in Westchester (as Rabinovitch, which tells me she didn't remarry), but I think I have to purchase the Social Security record to know for sure it is her. (I also still do not know where she is buried.)>>

I assume that the record you referred to is this listing in the Social Security Death Index:

Name: Anna Rabinovitch
Social Security Number: 092-26-2965
Birth Date: 6 Apr 1886
Issue Year: 1951
Issue State: New York
Last Residence: 10583, Scarsdale, Westchester, New York, USA
Death Date: Oct 1972

Good chance that she's the right Anna as the birth date matches her naturalization record.

A reminder: The location shown in the SSDI is the decedent's last residence, which is not necessarily the place of death. Someone residing in Scarsdale could easily have died in nearby New York City, in which case the record would not be filed with NY State, or elsewhere. I've also seen instances where the zip code isn't even the decedent's, but that of a family member to whose address the monthly Social Security check was mailed, pre-direct deposit.

Also wondering...  

Could the Anna Rabinovitch listed in the SSDI be the same one who is buried at Baron Hirsch Cemetery?

Name: Anna Rabinovitch
Death Date: 14 Oct 1972
Burial Place: Staten Island, New York, United States
Comments: wife, sister, aunt
Other Comments: Erste Jablonower Lodge No. 477 I.O.B.A., Section E
Cemetery: Baron Hirsch Cemetery
Cemetery Address: Richmond Road
Cemetery Burials: 212
Cemetery Comments: Cemetery is badly overgrown with poison ivy, briars and other vines. Some graves are toppled or inaccessible. Contact John Hoenig for more information, hoenig@... Landsmanshaft Info: Yabluniv, Ukraine (was Jablonow, Galicia)

I realize that Anna wasn't a "Galitzianer," but that doesn't rule out burial in a Galician landsmanshaft section. I'd want to try to get a photo of the grave to see the Hebrew patronymic that's hopefully there. (Emphasis on the word "try," because, as the note on JOWBR indicates, many stones at Baron Hirsch are inaccessible.)

If you do send to the NY State Dept. of Health for a death record, wait a few months -- i.e. until 50 years after filing -- to be eligible for an uncertified copy of the record. https://www.health.ny.gov/vital_records/genealogy.htm

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

On Sun, Aug 21, 2022 at 11:21 AM Robert Hanna <robert.hanna41@...> wrote:

Anna's death certificate should have the cemetery where she is buried.  You can get the certificate from the NYS Dept of Health in Albany NY.



Re: The Weekly News Nosh from JewishGen August 21, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates

Marilyn Hayes
 

Thank you so much… I look forward to the Weekly News Nosh.
Be well.
Marilyn

On Aug 21, 2022, at 12:32 PM, Phil Goldfarb <phil.goldfarb@...> wrote:

<dummyfile.0.part>

The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor

Date: August 28, 2022 

“A Family Without The Knowledge Of Their Past History, Origin And Culture Is Like A Tree Without Roots”
 

I apologize in advance as this Weekly News Nosh is a little longer this week as it contains stories from two weeks as opposed to a single week as I have been on vacation.

Enjoy this week’s News Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@...

 
1.       JewishGen Discussion Group (JGDG) surpasses 20,000 members! The JewishGen Discussion Group in August surpassed the 20,000-member mark with 1,165 new members being added this past year. There has also been over 10,500 new posts approved this year by our three volunteer moderators: Jessica Feinstein (U.K.), Stephen Jones (U.S.), and Lead Moderator Phil Goldfarb (U.S.). If you have not yet searched the JGDG archives, there are over 670,800+ messages going back to 1998 that can be searched by names, towns, almost any subject or topic and can be a terrific, untapped, genealogical resource for you. To join the JGDG go to: main@... | Home To search the 670,800+ messages, once you sign in, simply go to “messages” and then “search.” For help go to: support@...
 
2.       JewishGen Announces Viewmate Update. JewishGen recently updated Viewmate to make the main page run much faster. Viewmate is a service where researchers post images, they want information about - translations, or other information - and volunteers help them out. To read more see: Viewmate Runs Faster (jewishgen.org)
 
3.       The 2022 Annual IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) report. The Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) had a busy year monitoring and addressing
issues affecting access to public records.  From Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, these are highlights of what PRAMC worked on since last year’s report. Go to: PRAMC.Annual.Report.2022.pdf (iajgs.org)

 

4.       Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly. A free new feature on the MyHeritage mobile app that lets you easily tag multiple photos of the same individual in one go. Photo Tagger makes organizing your family photos easier and accelerates your productivity, enabling you to tag hundreds of photos in minutes. Read more from MyHeritage: Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly - MyHeritage Blog
 
5.       Legacy Family Tree Webinars is hosting their third annual Webtember: a free, month-long online genealogy conference. Every Friday in September, Legacy Family Tree Webinars will host multiple live and pre-recorded webinars with expert speakers on a wide variety of family history and DNA topics. A total of 31 webinars will take place, and they'll all be available to view for free until the end of the month. Go to: Upcoming Webinars - Legacy Family Tree Webinars to view the full schedule and register for sessions.
 
6.       MyHeritage Adds New Records in July. They added 11 collections with 15.4 million historical records. The collections originate from Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Chile, France, and Sweden. Most of the collections include high-quality images of the original records. To read more about specific records go to: Historical Record Collections Added in July 2022 - MyHeritage Blog
 
7.       Findmypast Releases Tree Search. Tree Search will help you: Search for ancestors you have in common with others, gather information from other members’ research and privately message that member, validate your own research, and help other Findmypast members to find their family stories. Read more from Findmypast: What is Tree Search? - Help and FAQs | findmypast.com
 
8.       Findmypast Adds almost Two Million Records for North of England. See their press release about these records: Get lost in 1.8 million new records across the North of England | Blog | findmypast.com

 

9.       Vatican Archives Opened: Desperate Letters from Jews During WWII Revealed. The virtual reproduction of a collection preserving the requests for help addressed to Pope Pius XII by Jews from all over Europe after the beginning of Nazi-Fascist persecution is now accessible to all. It consists of a total of 170 volumes, or nearly 40,000 files. Only 70% of the total material will be initially available but will later be supplemented with the final volumes currently being prepared. Requests were addressed to the Pope from all over Europe, with the aim of providing all the help possible. Requests could be made to obtain visas or passports to expatriate, find asylum, reunify families, obtain liberation from detention and transfers from one concentration camp to another, receive news regarding deported people, supplies of food or clothing, financial support, spiritual support and much more. Each of these requests constituted a case which, once processed, was destined for storage in a documentary series entitled “Ebrei”. It contains more than 2,700 cases with requests for help almost always for entire families or groups of people. Thousands of people persecuted for their membership to the Jewish religion, or for merely having “non-Aryan” ancestry, turned to the Vatican, in the knowledge that others had received help. Read more: https://momentmag.com/vatican-archives-opened-letters-from-jews-revealed/ Thank you to Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.
 
10.   New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis. The new law forms part of a package of legislation designed to honor and support Holocaust survivors. Nazis stole and confiscated hundreds of thousands of works of art during World War II, mostly from Jewish communities. The new law mandates that museums "prominently place a placard or other signage" on the artworks. This legislation allows institutions in New York to honor those whose lives were lost and whose personal possessions were stolen for profit. Artworks stolen by Nazis continue to face contentious public debates over their ownership. Read the story from CNN: New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis - CNN Style

 

11.   Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery. The findings, based on a set of ancient silver vessels, propose a new method for decoding Linear Elamite symbols. The language originates in the 5000-year-old city of Susa, in what today is southwestern Iran. An ancient urban oasis and the capital of Elam, Susa was one of the first places to use written symbols in its bustling society. Read the story from the Jerusalem Post: Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery - study - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

12.   The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust. Issachar Ber Ryback preserved the Eastern European Jewish shtetl in his art works, reaping fame in his lifetime that rivalled that of Marc Chagall. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum in Paris gives a glimpse into his world. His main claim to fame was as an artist who drew and documented the ruined Jewish villages of Eastern Europe, combining Jewish elements and Yiddish words in works that fused cubism, the Russian avant-garde style, German expressionism, and futurism. Read more about Ryback and the exhibit from Haaretz: The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust - Jewish World - Haaretz.com

 

13.   European Days of Jewish Culture Kick off September 4, 2022. European Days of Jewish Culture (EDJC) kick off September 4th, however some events are starting in August. This year’s theme is “Renewal”. See: https://jewisheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Renewal.pdf   from the National Library of Israel. The EDJC is coordinated under the auspices of the AEPJ (European Association for the Preservation and Promotion of Jewish Culture and Heritage), in partnership with the National Library of Israel. It seeks to educate about the role of Jewish heritage, culture, and history in local, regional, and Europe-wide context, among other things in order to demystify the Jewish world and promote understanding. To find events and national programs see: https://jewisheritage.org/edjc/2022-renewal   Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for passing along this story.
 
14.   Doctors in Rome invented a fake infectious disease to save Jews and keep the Nazis away: “Syndrome K,” which hits digital and VOD platforms after some Jewish film festival showings, tells that little-known, surefire story: How three doctors at a hospital in Rome shielded a group of Jews from the Nazis in 1943 and 1944 by inventing a fake infectious disease called Syndrome K. The prospect of catching the disease kept the Nazis, who were occupying Rome following the fall of Mussolini, away from the hospital. The Jews there hung on until the Allies liberated the city in June of 1944. Read more from JTA: To save Jews and keep the Nazis away, these doctors invented a fake infectious disease - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)
 
15.   Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz honored by Vatican cardinal with Jewish ancestry. Cardinal Czerny noted that his mother’s relatives, despite their conversion to Catholicism, were also persecuted by the Nazis for having Jewish ancestry. Read the full story from JTA: Canadian cardinal with Jewish ancestry honors Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)
 
16.   Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey. The document made by monks, narrates the history of Israel and Judah and is on public display at its former home for the first time. The double-sided sheet is made from vellum, a specially prepared animal skin, usually that of a calf – that was used for books until the rise of paper production in the later Middle Ages. The Latin text is thought to have been written around the 13th century, probably at some point between 1225 and 1250. Read the story from Jewish News: Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey | Jewish News

 

17.   Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage. Meydad Eliyahu’s researched the roots of the Cochin Jews and found that his family’s history nearly vanished when they came to Israel. ‘It’s a reminder that something was once here.’ Read the story from Haaretz: Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage - Israel News - Haaretz.com

 

18.   An artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok, Poland could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years. Excavations have begun at a large, artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok where researchers believe possibly hundreds of historic matzevot uprooted under communism from another cemetery were buried. To read more from Jewish Heritage Europe see: Poland: an artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years - Jewish Heritage Europe (jewish-heritage-europe.eu)

 

19.   Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary. Out on August 19, a new film, ‘Three Minutes – A Lengthening,’ by Dutch filmmaker Bianca Stigter, looks in depth at recovered footage of a Polish town prior to its devastation. In 1938, David Kurtz, a Polish-born Jew who came to the United States as a child, took his wife on a “grand tour” of Europe. A successful businessman, he brought along with him a brand-new movie camera. He visited Nasielsk, the small village where he had grown up. Nasielsk had a significant Jewish population (over 40 percent of the town) and a thriving community. The day he visited, people were out in full force, eager to show off due to the novelty of the camera. Read more from Times of Israel: Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary | The Times of Israel

 

20.   City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust. The International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation named the city an honorary member. The foundation is named after the Swedish diplomat Raul Wallenberg, who helped save 200,000 Jews in Budapest in 1944 by giving them protective documents, putting them in protected housing and ensuring their release from Nazi deportation trains, death marches and labor service brigades, Read the story from Jewish News Syndicate: City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust - JNS.org

 

21.   More than 4,000 people gathered at the Coney Island Amphitheater in Brooklyn for the first annual Chosen Comedy Festival, featuring Jewish comedians and musical acts. The event served as a benefit for the Ukrainian Emergency Performing Arts Fund. Read the story from The Jewish Journal: Chosen Comedy Festival in Coney Island Lives up to Hype (jewishjournal.com)

 

22.   The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of “The Kaiser of Atlantis.”  Under a perpetual shadow of death, as train after train was sent to Auschwitz, Viktor Ullmann and Peter Kien, imprisoned in the Theresienstadt Ghetto, composed a searing opera satirizing the awful reality in Europe. Both were murdered, but a suitcase filled with Ullmann's works survived to tell the story of the human spirit’s triumph over death. Read the story from the National Library of Israel: The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of "The Kaiser of Atlantis" (nli.org.il)

 

23.   In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a farming village founded in 1882, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive. With museums boasting lifelike reproductions of life in the olden days and a seemingly endless number of historically significant sites, one of Israel’s oldest towns is must-see. Read the story from The Times of Israel: In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive | The Times of Israel

 

24.   Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River. Over 20 explosive-laden warships resurface in eastern Serbia near the river port town of Prahovo, blocking shipping and posing danger to fishing industry. The Danube is at its lowest levels in almost a century. Hundreds of ships belonging to Nazi Germany’s Black Sea fleet were sunk in the river as they retreated from advancing Soviet forces in 1944. Read the story from The Times of Israel: Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River | The Times of Israel

 

25.   People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now. Did you know that a thriving Jewish community has existed for centuries in Gibraltar, the British territory at the tip of the Iberian peninsula? Even when Jews were excluded from Spain, tiny Gibraltar was home to a prosperous Sephardic community that lived in harmony with their non-Jewish neighbors. Read the story from Aish: People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now - aish.com

 

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The Weekly News Nosh from JewishGen August 21, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates

Phil Goldfarb
 


The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor

Date: August 28, 2022 

“A Family Without The Knowledge Of Their Past History, Origin And Culture Is Like A Tree Without Roots”

 

I apologize in advance as this Weekly News Nosh is a little longer this week as it contains stories from two weeks as opposed to a single week as I have been on vacation.

Enjoy this week’s News Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@...

 

1.       JewishGen Discussion Group (JGDG) surpasses 20,000 members! The JewishGen Discussion Group in August surpassed the 20,000-member mark with 1,165 new members being added this past year. There has also been over 10,500 new posts approved this year by our three volunteer moderators: Jessica Feinstein (U.K.), Stephen Jones (U.S.), and Lead Moderator Phil Goldfarb (U.S.). If you have not yet searched the JGDG archives, there are over 670,800+ messages going back to 1998 that can be searched by names, towns, almost any subject or topic and can be a terrific, untapped, genealogical resource for you. To join the JGDG go to: main@... | Home To search the 670,800+ messages, once you sign in, simply go to “messages” and then “search.” For help go to: support@...

 

2.       JewishGen Announces Viewmate Update. JewishGen recently updated Viewmate to make the main page run much faster. Viewmate is a service where researchers post images, they want information about - translations, or other information - and volunteers help them out. To read more see: Viewmate Runs Faster (jewishgen.org)

 

3.       The 2022 Annual IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) report. The Public Records Access Monitoring Committee (PRAMC) had a busy year monitoring and addressing

issues affecting access to public records.  From Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, these are highlights of what PRAMC worked on since last year’s report. Go to: PRAMC.Annual.Report.2022.pdf (iajgs.org)

 

4.       Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly. A free new feature on the MyHeritage mobile app that lets you easily tag multiple photos of the same individual in one go. Photo Tagger makes organizing your family photos easier and accelerates your productivity, enabling you to tag hundreds of photos in minutes. Read more from MyHeritage: Introducing Photo Tagger: Tag Multiple Photos Instantly - MyHeritage Blog

 

5.       Legacy Family Tree Webinars is hosting their third annual Webtember: a free, month-long online genealogy conference. Every Friday in September, Legacy Family Tree Webinars will host multiple live and pre-recorded webinars with expert speakers on a wide variety of family history and DNA topics. A total of 31 webinars will take place, and they'll all be available to view for free until the end of the month. Go to: Upcoming Webinars - Legacy Family Tree Webinars to view the full schedule and register for sessions.

 

6.       MyHeritage Adds New Records in July. They added 11 collections with 15.4 million historical records. The collections originate from Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Chile, France, and Sweden. Most of the collections include high-quality images of the original records. To read more about specific records go to: Historical Record Collections Added in July 2022 - MyHeritage Blog

 

7.       Findmypast Releases Tree Search. Tree Search will help you: Search for ancestors you have in common with others, gather information from other members’ research and privately message that member, validate your own research, and help other Findmypast members to find their family stories. Read more from Findmypast: What is Tree Search? - Help and FAQs | findmypast.com

 

8.       Findmypast Adds almost Two Million Records for North of England. See their press release about these records: Get lost in 1.8 million new records across the North of England | Blog | findmypast.com

 

9.       Vatican Archives Opened: Desperate Letters from Jews During WWII Revealed. The virtual reproduction of a collection preserving the requests for help addressed to Pope Pius XII by Jews from all over Europe after the beginning of Nazi-Fascist persecution is now accessible to all. It consists of a total of 170 volumes, or nearly 40,000 files. Only 70% of the total material will be initially available but will later be supplemented with the final volumes currently being prepared. Requests were addressed to the Pope from all over Europe, with the aim of providing all the help possible. Requests could be made to obtain visas or passports to expatriate, find asylum, reunify families, obtain liberation from detention and transfers from one concentration camp to another, receive news regarding deported people, supplies of food or clothing, financial support, spiritual support and much more. Each of these requests constituted a case which, once processed, was destined for storage in a documentary series entitled “Ebrei”. It contains more than 2,700 cases with requests for help almost always for entire families or groups of people. Thousands of people persecuted for their membership to the Jewish religion, or for merely having “non-Aryan” ancestry, turned to the Vatican, in the knowledge that others had received help. Read more: https://momentmag.com/vatican-archives-opened-letters-from-jews-revealed/ Thank you to Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.

 

10.   New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis. The new law forms part of a package of legislation designed to honor and support Holocaust survivors. Nazis stole and confiscated hundreds of thousands of works of art during World War II, mostly from Jewish communities. The new law mandates that museums "prominently place a placard or other signage" on the artworks. This legislation allows institutions in New York to honor those whose lives were lost and whose personal possessions were stolen for profit. Artworks stolen by Nazis continue to face contentious public debates over their ownership. Read the story from CNN: New York museums are now required to disclose artwork looted by Nazis - CNN Style

 

11.   Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery. The findings, based on a set of ancient silver vessels, propose a new method for decoding Linear Elamite symbols. The language originates in the 5000-year-old city of Susa, in what today is southwestern Iran. An ancient urban oasis and the capital of Elam, Susa was one of the first places to use written symbols in its bustling society. Read the story from the Jerusalem Post: Ancient writing deciphered nearly a century after its discovery - study - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

12.   The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust. Issachar Ber Ryback preserved the Eastern European Jewish shtetl in his art works, reaping fame in his lifetime that rivalled that of Marc Chagall. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum in Paris gives a glimpse into his world. His main claim to fame was as an artist who drew and documented the ruined Jewish villages of Eastern Europe, combining Jewish elements and Yiddish words in works that fused cubism, the Russian avant-garde style, German expressionism, and futurism. Read more about Ryback and the exhibit from Haaretz: The Jewish Artist Whose Work Foretold the Holocaust - Jewish World - Haaretz.com

 

13.   European Days of Jewish Culture Kick off September 4, 2022. European Days of Jewish Culture (EDJC) kick off September 4th, however some events are starting in August. This year’s theme is “Renewal”. See: https://jewisheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Renewal.pdf   from the National Library of Israel. The EDJC is coordinated under the auspices of the AEPJ (European Association for the Preservation and Promotion of Jewish Culture and Heritage), in partnership with the National Library of Israel. It seeks to educate about the role of Jewish heritage, culture, and history in local, regional, and Europe-wide context, among other things in order to demystify the Jewish world and promote understanding. To find events and national programs see: https://jewisheritage.org/edjc/2022-renewal   Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for passing along this story.

 

14.   Doctors in Rome invented a fake infectious disease to save Jews and keep the Nazis away: “Syndrome K,” which hits digital and VOD platforms after some Jewish film festival showings, tells that little-known, surefire story: How three doctors at a hospital in Rome shielded a group of Jews from the Nazis in 1943 and 1944 by inventing a fake infectious disease called Syndrome K. The prospect of catching the disease kept the Nazis, who were occupying Rome following the fall of Mussolini, away from the hospital. The Jews there hung on until the Allies liberated the city in June of 1944. Read more from JTA: To save Jews and keep the Nazis away, these doctors invented a fake infectious disease - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

15.   Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz honored by Vatican cardinal with Jewish ancestry. Cardinal Czerny noted that his mother’s relatives, despite their conversion to Catholicism, were also persecuted by the Nazis for having Jewish ancestry. Read the full story from JTA: Canadian cardinal with Jewish ancestry honors Jewish-born nun and saint who was murdered at Auschwitz - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

16.   Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey. The document made by monks, narrates the history of Israel and Judah and is on public display at its former home for the first time. The double-sided sheet is made from vellum, a specially prepared animal skin, usually that of a calf – that was used for books until the rise of paper production in the later Middle Ages. The Latin text is thought to have been written around the 13th century, probably at some point between 1225 and 1250. Read the story from Jewish News: Page from 800-year-old bible on display at Glastonbury Abbey | Jewish News

 

17.   Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage. Meydad Eliyahu’s researched the roots of the Cochin Jews and found that his family’s history nearly vanished when they came to Israel. ‘It’s a reminder that something was once here.’ Read the story from Haaretz: Israeli Artist Explores His Indian Jewish Heritage - Israel News - Haaretz.com

 

18.   An artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok, Poland could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years. Excavations have begun at a large, artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok where researchers believe possibly hundreds of historic matzevot uprooted under communism from another cemetery were buried. To read more from Jewish Heritage Europe see: Poland: an artificial mound outside the Bagnowka Jewish cemetery in Białystok could cover hundreds of matzevot dating back over 200 years - Jewish Heritage Europe (jewish-heritage-europe.eu)

 

19.   Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary. Out on August 19, a new film, ‘Three Minutes – A Lengthening,’ by Dutch filmmaker Bianca Stigter, looks in depth at recovered footage of a Polish town prior to its devastation. In 1938, David Kurtz, a Polish-born Jew who came to the United States as a child, took his wife on a “grand tour” of Europe. A successful businessman, he brought along with him a brand-new movie camera. He visited Nasielsk, the small village where he had grown up. Nasielsk had a significant Jewish population (over 40 percent of the town) and a thriving community. The day he visited, people were out in full force, eager to show off due to the novelty of the camera. Read more from Times of Israel: Lost for decades, 3 minutes of pre-Holocaust life becomes a full-length documentary | The Times of Israel

 

20.   City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust. The International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation named the city an honorary member. The foundation is named after the Swedish diplomat Raul Wallenberg, who helped save 200,000 Jews in Budapest in 1944 by giving them protective documents, putting them in protected housing and ensuring their release from Nazi deportation trains, death marches and labor service brigades, Read the story from Jewish News Syndicate: City of Milan honored for helping to save Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust - JNS.org

 

21.   More than 4,000 people gathered at the Coney Island Amphitheater in Brooklyn for the first annual Chosen Comedy Festival, featuring Jewish comedians and musical acts. The event served as a benefit for the Ukrainian Emergency Performing Arts Fund. Read the story from The Jewish Journal: Chosen Comedy Festival in Coney Island Lives up to Hype (jewishjournal.com)

 

22.   The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of “The Kaiser of Atlantis.”  Under a perpetual shadow of death, as train after train was sent to Auschwitz, Viktor Ullmann and Peter Kien, imprisoned in the Theresienstadt Ghetto, composed a searing opera satirizing the awful reality in Europe. Both were murdered, but a suitcase filled with Ullmann's works survived to tell the story of the human spirit’s triumph over death. Read the story from the National Library of Israel: The Opera That Survived the Ghetto: The Story of "The Kaiser of Atlantis" (nli.org.il)

 

23.   In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a farming village founded in 1882, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive. With museums boasting lifelike reproductions of life in the olden days and a seemingly endless number of historically significant sites, one of Israel’s oldest towns is must-see. Read the story from The Times of Israel: In unassuming Rishon Lezion, a treasure trove of Israeli history comes alive | The Times of Israel

 

24.   Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River. Over 20 explosive-laden warships resurface in eastern Serbia near the river port town of Prahovo, blocking shipping and posing danger to fishing industry. The Danube is at its lowest levels in almost a century. Hundreds of ships belonging to Nazi Germany’s Black Sea fleet were sunk in the river as they retreated from advancing Soviet forces in 1944. Read the story from The Times of Israel: Drought exposes dozens of Nazi ships sunk in Danube River | The Times of Israel

 

25.   People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now. Did you know that a thriving Jewish community has existed for centuries in Gibraltar, the British territory at the tip of the Iberian peninsula? Even when Jews were excluded from Spain, tiny Gibraltar was home to a prosperous Sephardic community that lived in harmony with their non-Jewish neighbors. Read the story from Aish: People of the Rock: The Jewish Community of Gibraltar, Then and Now - aish.com

 

Copyright © 2022 JewishGen.org, All rights reserved.
JewishGen is an Affiliate of the Museum of Jewish Heritage.

You are receiving this email because you registered for
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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.


Longstanding Riddles of Jewish Genomics Explored in New Article #dna #rabbinic #sephardic

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues of Jewish Genomics,

I've released an article in which I identify and discuss various longstanding mysteries of Jewish genomics, in the light of recent published and unpublished research.

The topics include: 1) possible origins of several controversial uniparental lineages found in modern Ashkenazic populations (ydna: Q2a-Y2200, R1a-Y2619, R1a-Z2123, R1b-ZZ12, G2a-Z6552; mtdna: K1a1b1a), 2) 14th Century Erfurt data vis a vis the Khazar Hypothesis, 3) genetic footprint of the Judeo-Greco-Roman-Byzantine mixing event, 4) First Temple ancestries of the Jews of Africa, Yemen, and India, 5) the Sephardic-Ashkenazi phenomenon, 6) whereabouts of Occitanian Jews, and 7) historicity of Biblical genealogies.

The article may be downloaded here: https://www.academia.edu/84138593 (a free account is necessary to download articles from this site, which includes many papers relevant to Jewish genomics).

I hope some or all of the topics may be of interest to you.

Adam Cherson
NY, NY
Benyakonski, Kherszon, Rubinovich, Solts, Grodsinski, Levine, Cohen, Kaplan, Lubetski, Karchmer, Horwitz, Rabinovich, Zussman (Lida, Voronova, Dieveniskes, Konvaliski, Smarhon, Vilna)


Re: "Stolpersteine" / Stones of Remembrance #germany

csicher@...
 

In addition, beginning in 1985, there are "Berliner Gedenktafel" on buildings around the city (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_memorial_plaque). This one--https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gedenktafel_Kurt_Singer.jpg--is at Mommsenstr. 56, next to a building where my father lived 1931-33, with a good view of Nazi demonstrations. At the time that the Gedenktafel was erected, his death at Theresienstadt on 7 Feb. 1944 wasn't known. When you see this quite large plaque, you "stumble" in your mind.
--
Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


Re: Brick wall regarding paper trail going dry in NY #records #usa

Robert Hanna
 

Anna's death certificate should have the cemetery where she is buried.  You can get the certificate from the NYS Dept of Health in Albany NY.

Robert Hanna
NYC

Researching: CHANAN/HANAN/HANNE/HEINE/HINEY (Warsaw, Poland); BLUMENBLAT (Sarnaki, Poland); KARASIK, THOMASHOW/TOMOSHOFF, COHEN (Babruysk, Belarus); RUBINSTEIN, BUNDEROFF, PASTILNIK, NEMOYTEN, DISKIN (Minsk, Belarus).

4201 - 4220 of 675158