Date   

Re: Wrong birthdate/wrong death date #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/24/2001 11:57:57 AM Eastern Standard Time,
zach4v6@... writes:

<< Another lesson in the occasional unreliability of official documents.

. . . . the tombstone had a Jewish date which was off by
several months. . . . . it seems that when the deceased made aliyah
>from England thirty-odd years ago, the local bureaucrat misread the 7
(July) for 4 (April) and therefore got the birth date wrong in both
calendars.

How about 20 *years*?

In the book documenting the local cemetery, the first wife of my gggfather,
Baruch WOLFF of Pfungstadt is shown to have been buried 19 years and 9
months *after* Baruch, a fresh widower, married my gggmother Kaehle MAINZER
of Lorsch as recorded in the community's marriage records (OK, Baruch was
the Parnas [president] of the community and could have forged that, I guess.
Presumably his standing in the community helped him find a bride so soon
after he was widowed).

But a cross check of the matching Hebrew dates explained the difference. In
reading her death date on her tombstone, the researcher documenting the
cemetery had read the Hebrew letter `ayin (numerically 70) as tsadeh
(numerically 90)--not at all an uncommon problem. So there's your 20 year
error.

As for errors by Israeli bureaucrats: my name in Hebrew consonant
equivalents is B-R-N-T, variousy pronounced Brant, Berent, Bar-Net, Bernat.
I learned to live with that and chose not to Israelize my family name. The
Israel Army went one further: whoever made out my army identity book in
otherwise clear handwriting, combined the last two letters of my name, nun
and tet, so that they resembled a final tsadeh. I never quite got used to
answering when the name BRATZ was called out, and was glad to leave the
service in early 1949.

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Sheleshe in Poland and Russian army records #general

Leah Aharoni
 

I am wondering if anyone can help me to ID the shtetl whose name is
pronounced as "Sheleshe". Presumably it's located near Chelm, Lublin in
Polan.

Likewise, has anyone come across record on Russian army soldiers (from
Poland) in WWI and WWII.

My greatgrandfather served in Russian army during WWI and then settled in
Russia. My greatfather served in the Red Army in WWII.

Thanks a lot for your help,

Leah Aharoni
Israel


Researcher25119:Levine, Hein, Chernikoff #general

WAlmeleh@...
 

Will Research 25119, who submitted the family tree for the Levine, Hein, and
Chernikoff families, please e-mail me. Messages to you are not getting
through. I am the great-niece of Jacob Levine and would like to share
information with you.

Wendy Levin Almeleh
Great Neck, NY
(Walmeleh@...)


GORDON brothers #general

Michael Fischer <miketran@...>
 

I am looking for the family of Abraham JACHNUK and Rose . Their son
William was my grandfather. He had 3 brothers, Joseph, Samuel and Phillip.
The family came >from Bialystock, Poland and came to America in about 1904-
1906 When they came here they took the name GORDON after a cousin who met
William at the boat. Their Yiddish names were, Yussel, Shloime and Feivel.
Phillip was married to Gussie and had 3 children, Philli, Sylvie and Abe.
William was married to Annie. They had a son Abe and a daughter Sylvia. I
only know that William died in 1938. I am named after him

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sheleshe in Poland and Russian army records #general

Leah Aharoni
 

I am wondering if anyone can help me to ID the shtetl whose name is
pronounced as "Sheleshe". Presumably it's located near Chelm, Lublin in
Polan.

Likewise, has anyone come across record on Russian army soldiers (from
Poland) in WWI and WWII.

My greatgrandfather served in Russian army during WWI and then settled in
Russia. My greatfather served in the Red Army in WWII.

Thanks a lot for your help,

Leah Aharoni
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researcher25119:Levine, Hein, Chernikoff #general

WAlmeleh@...
 

Will Research 25119, who submitted the family tree for the Levine, Hein, and
Chernikoff families, please e-mail me. Messages to you are not getting
through. I am the great-niece of Jacob Levine and would like to share
information with you.

Wendy Levin Almeleh
Great Neck, NY
(Walmeleh@...)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wrong birthdate/wrong death date #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/24/2001 11:57:57 AM Eastern Standard Time,
zach4v6@... writes:

<< Another lesson in the occasional unreliability of official documents.

. . . . the tombstone had a Jewish date which was off by
several months. . . . . it seems that when the deceased made aliyah
>from England thirty-odd years ago, the local bureaucrat misread the 7
(July) for 4 (April) and therefore got the birth date wrong in both
calendars.

How about 20 *years*?

In the book documenting the local cemetery, the first wife of my gggfather,
Baruch WOLFF of Pfungstadt is shown to have been buried 19 years and 9
months *after* Baruch, a fresh widower, married my gggmother Kaehle MAINZER
of Lorsch as recorded in the community's marriage records (OK, Baruch was
the Parnas [president] of the community and could have forged that, I guess.
Presumably his standing in the community helped him find a bride so soon
after he was widowed).

But a cross check of the matching Hebrew dates explained the difference. In
reading her death date on her tombstone, the researcher documenting the
cemetery had read the Hebrew letter `ayin (numerically 70) as tsadeh
(numerically 90)--not at all an uncommon problem. So there's your 20 year
error.

As for errors by Israeli bureaucrats: my name in Hebrew consonant
equivalents is B-R-N-T, variousy pronounced Brant, Berent, Bar-Net, Bernat.
I learned to live with that and chose not to Israelize my family name. The
Israel Army went one further: whoever made out my army identity book in
otherwise clear handwriting, combined the last two letters of my name, nun
and tet, so that they resembled a final tsadeh. I never quite got used to
answering when the name BRATZ was called out, and was glad to leave the
service in early 1949.

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GORDON brothers #general

Michael Fischer <miketran@...>
 

I am looking for the family of Abraham JACHNUK and Rose . Their son
William was my grandfather. He had 3 brothers, Joseph, Samuel and Phillip.
The family came >from Bialystock, Poland and came to America in about 1904-
1906 When they came here they took the name GORDON after a cousin who met
William at the boat. Their Yiddish names were, Yussel, Shloime and Feivel.
Phillip was married to Gussie and had 3 children, Philli, Sylvie and Abe.
William was married to Annie. They had a son Abe and a daughter Sylvia. I
only know that William died in 1938. I am named after him

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine "Old Jewish Cemetery," Hartford #ukraine

Steve Franklin <franklin@...>
 

Hello again,

I realize this is a bit off topic, but I wonder if anyone in this group
from the Hartford, Conn. area has any idea what would be the official
name of what my relatives insist on referring to as "The Old Jewish
Cemetery" there? You can reply privately if you wish. Any help would be
appreciated.

Steve Franklin
Baltimore

Franklin, Schaff, Bloom, Cooper, etc. at:
http://www.bcpl.net/~franklin/steve.htm


"Old Jewish Cemetery," Hartford #ukraine

Steve Franklin <franklin@...>
 

Hello again,

I realize this is a bit off topic, but I wonder if anyone in this group
from the Hartford, Conn. area has any idea what would be the official
name of what my relatives insist on referring to as "The Old Jewish
Cemetery" there? You can reply privately if you wish. Any help would be
appreciated.

Steve Franklin
Baltimore

Franklin, Schaff, Bloom, Cooper, etc. at:
http://www.bcpl.net/~franklin/steve.htm


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Ukraine to Argentina 1890 #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Mario Schejtman in Jerusalem wrote:

I learned not long ago that both my grandparents families >from my
father's side emmigrated to Argentina >from the area. Specifically,
my grandmother's family ARCUSIN / ARCUSCHIN came >from Kherson,
and my grandfather's family SCHECHTMAN came >from a town called
Britschewo, that is not far away.

Both families migrated to Argentina around 1890, among the first
Jewish groups to go with the Baron Hirsch's JCA.
Dear Mario Schejtman,

I also learned not long ago that my mother's father's family
WINARSKY left Kiev circa 1890, joining a Baron Hirsch colony in
Argentina.

I have thus far found three sources of information:

(1) The records of Baron Hirsch's "Jewish Colonization
Association" were donated to the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People, which is located here in Jerusalem. The CAHJP
is independent of, but located on the campus of, the Hebrew
University at Givat Ram. I heard a recent rumour that the CAHJP
might be relocating in the forseeable future.

I spent a number of months' worth of afternoons last year at the
CAHJP, wading through some of the records of this JCA in their
collection. All of the records that I saw were records kept by the
main JCA office in Paris.

The records are voluminous, unindexed, and in many various
languages (French, English, Spanish, German, Yiddish, Hebrew).
They are the original documents, many of them in quite delicate
condition, some illegible because of age. Most of them do not refer
to individual colonists, rather are internal correspondence between
the main JCA office in Paris and the local administrators of the
various colonies. Knowing which colony your family went to in
Argentina will help a lot in locating records. Actually, the archivists
at the CAHJP wouldn't even let me order files >from the archives
(which are stored elsewhere) unless I knew which colony I was
interested in. In summary, there are true jems to be found in these
records, but the actual records search is not for the faint-hearted.

The JCA was organized by Baron Maurice (Moshe) Hirsch, a
wealthy and religious Jewish banker, who wanted to help his
brethren in eastern Europe. The idea was to organize Jewish
agricultural colonies in places like South America or Canada, far
from pogroms, where the Jewish colonists could support
themselves by farming.

In going through these records, I learned a great deal about what
conditions must have been like for the families that went to
Argentina with the JCA. The first colonists (arrivals c1890-1892)
suffered through repeated upheavals in the local JCA administration
in Buenos Aires. In those first few years there were something like
four successive administrations that were replaced one after the
other, some for incompetence, some for other reasons. Until the
local JCA got their act together, the colonists suffered >from lack of
proper shelter in the cold & rain of winter and in the heat &
humidity of the summer, inadequate food distribution, lack of basic
farming implements and tools, poorly organized land distribution,
outbreaks of diseases, locust plagues, etc. Additionally, some of
the colonists apparently weren't so interested in becoming farmers.
Some were criticized for going into business instead of farming,
while others (a noisy minority) were apparently anarchists, only
interested in trying to blackmail the local JCA administration into
giving them handouts. By 1893-4, many of the original colonists
had suffered enough, and wanted out.

To make a long story short, my many afternoons wading through
the JCA files *did* produce results for me personally. I found the
name of my great-grandfather "Solomon WINARSKY" in a 1893
census list of working colonists in the settlement of Mauricio,
Argentina. This particular list is only of working colonists, i.e., it
does not include family members. Later, I found a letter which lists
individually all of the family members of my great-grandfather's
immediate family with their ages, including my grandfather, aged 3.
This letter was dated April 21 1893, written by the Buenos Aires
JCA administration. It is a notification to the Paris JCA office listing
colonists who were being sent out of Argentina, most headed for
North America by way of Hamburg. My great-grandfather is listed
as a farmer, headed for New Orleans by way of Hamburg.

While I was already spending the time going through the JCA
records, as I came across many mentions of the names of various
individual colonists, I began compiling a list, with the idea of
making an index of the names of individual colonists that I found
mentioned. I also photocopied many of the documents that I came
across which list many names of individual colonists, such as
periodic internal JCA census information for the various Argentinian
colonies.

(2) Hamburg online immigration database: it seems that many, if
not most, of the JCA colonists travelled through the port of
Hamburg on their way to or >from Argentina. I found my great-
grandfather's family listed on their way to Argentina in 1891 as
"MINARSKY" instead of WINARSKY. According to the
abovementioned JCA letter, they also left Argentina by way of
Hamburg.

(3) the Agentinian Jewish Genealogical Society has lists compiled
from cemetery information, and possibly can get vital records >from
Argentina.

I hope that this helps,

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Re: Ukraine to Argentina 1890 #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Mario Schejtman in Jerusalem wrote:

I learned not long ago that both my grandparents families >from my
father's side emmigrated to Argentina >from the area. Specifically,
my grandmother's family ARCUSIN / ARCUSCHIN came >from Kherson,
and my grandfather's family SCHECHTMAN came >from a town called
Britschewo, that is not far away.

Both families migrated to Argentina around 1890, among the first
Jewish groups to go with the Baron Hirsch's JCA.
Dear Mario Schejtman,

I also learned not long ago that my mother's father's family
WINARSKY left Kiev circa 1890, joining a Baron Hirsch colony in
Argentina.

I have thus far found three sources of information:

(1) The records of Baron Hirsch's "Jewish Colonization
Association" were donated to the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People, which is located here in Jerusalem. The CAHJP
is independent of, but located on the campus of, the Hebrew
University at Givat Ram. I heard a recent rumour that the CAHJP
might be relocating in the forseeable future.

I spent a number of months' worth of afternoons last year at the
CAHJP, wading through some of the records of this JCA in their
collection. All of the records that I saw were records kept by the
main JCA office in Paris.

The records are voluminous, unindexed, and in many various
languages (French, English, Spanish, German, Yiddish, Hebrew).
They are the original documents, many of them in quite delicate
condition, some illegible because of age. Most of them do not refer
to individual colonists, rather are internal correspondence between
the main JCA office in Paris and the local administrators of the
various colonies. Knowing which colony your family went to in
Argentina will help a lot in locating records. Actually, the archivists
at the CAHJP wouldn't even let me order files >from the archives
(which are stored elsewhere) unless I knew which colony I was
interested in. In summary, there are true jems to be found in these
records, but the actual records search is not for the faint-hearted.

The JCA was organized by Baron Maurice (Moshe) Hirsch, a
wealthy and religious Jewish banker, who wanted to help his
brethren in eastern Europe. The idea was to organize Jewish
agricultural colonies in places like South America or Canada, far
from pogroms, where the Jewish colonists could support
themselves by farming.

In going through these records, I learned a great deal about what
conditions must have been like for the families that went to
Argentina with the JCA. The first colonists (arrivals c1890-1892)
suffered through repeated upheavals in the local JCA administration
in Buenos Aires. In those first few years there were something like
four successive administrations that were replaced one after the
other, some for incompetence, some for other reasons. Until the
local JCA got their act together, the colonists suffered >from lack of
proper shelter in the cold & rain of winter and in the heat &
humidity of the summer, inadequate food distribution, lack of basic
farming implements and tools, poorly organized land distribution,
outbreaks of diseases, locust plagues, etc. Additionally, some of
the colonists apparently weren't so interested in becoming farmers.
Some were criticized for going into business instead of farming,
while others (a noisy minority) were apparently anarchists, only
interested in trying to blackmail the local JCA administration into
giving them handouts. By 1893-4, many of the original colonists
had suffered enough, and wanted out.

To make a long story short, my many afternoons wading through
the JCA files *did* produce results for me personally. I found the
name of my great-grandfather "Solomon WINARSKY" in a 1893
census list of working colonists in the settlement of Mauricio,
Argentina. This particular list is only of working colonists, i.e., it
does not include family members. Later, I found a letter which lists
individually all of the family members of my great-grandfather's
immediate family with their ages, including my grandfather, aged 3.
This letter was dated April 21 1893, written by the Buenos Aires
JCA administration. It is a notification to the Paris JCA office listing
colonists who were being sent out of Argentina, most headed for
North America by way of Hamburg. My great-grandfather is listed
as a farmer, headed for New Orleans by way of Hamburg.

While I was already spending the time going through the JCA
records, as I came across many mentions of the names of various
individual colonists, I began compiling a list, with the idea of
making an index of the names of individual colonists that I found
mentioned. I also photocopied many of the documents that I came
across which list many names of individual colonists, such as
periodic internal JCA census information for the various Argentinian
colonies.

(2) Hamburg online immigration database: it seems that many, if
not most, of the JCA colonists travelled through the port of
Hamburg on their way to or >from Argentina. I found my great-
grandfather's family listed on their way to Argentina in 1891 as
"MINARSKY" instead of WINARSKY. According to the
abovementioned JCA letter, they also left Argentina by way of
Hamburg.

(3) the Agentinian Jewish Genealogical Society has lists compiled
from cemetery information, and possibly can get vital records >from
Argentina.

I hope that this helps,

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Update to my 12-20=01 Berdichev message #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

I didn't expect to update my Berdichev message of 12-20-01 so soon, but
I thought I should now do so, lest I forget to tell you what I've learned
since my message was published.

First I want to refer Berdichev genealogists to a section of Linda
Berkowitz's extraordinary "Jewish-History.com" website at:

http://jewish-history.com/Occident/volume2/nov1844/berditschew.html

I've known about Ms. Berkowitz's site for several years but have only
rarely visited it beause none of my ancestors arrived in the US before
1896, and I thought the website would not hold much interest for me. It is
largely devoted to information about Jews who came to the US much earlier
than mine and has a large section about Jews who fought in the Civil War.

But during the past couple of days, I discovered at this website a
section called "The Occident and American Jewish Advocate." Here there is
a collection of articles taken >from microfilmed copies >from a publication
that was issued in Philadelphia >from 1844-1848. I read a brief but
interesting article about Odessa's Jews, to which I've already referred
the members of the Odessa mail group at Rootsweb.com. But there is also
another brief but interesting article at the above noted URL which is
entitled "Jewish Artificers in Berditchew." After some discussion, it
presents a "statistical" paragraph about its Jewish population and the
number of Jews engaged in each of the various occupations noted.

Those of you who are interested in reading more about Russian history
may want to click on the many other articles >from the four volumes of "The
Occident. such as one showing the text of the 1827 ukase regarding
conscription, an article about the relief of 30 or so Jews >from that
ukase, and several articles about Dr. Lilienthal and his efforts and those
of other "enlightened" Jews to ameliorate the lives and living conditions
of the more unfortunate of their brethren. There are also chapters >from
an ardent Chassidic rabbi's lengthy refutation of those efforts. Also at
the same website at:

http://www.jewish-history.com/cantons.htm

is an article about the Cantonists which was written by a cantonist
soldier named Herzl Yankl Tsam. This is followed by a bibliography.

Secondly, I had written earlier that I did not know where the films
regarding Berdichev I mentioned could be found. Although I am still not
sure, I think they may be found in the film library of the National
Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University. YIVO may also have the
films I mentioned. I was recently notified by a RAV SIG member that part
of YIVO's catalogue of holdings has been put online and that eventually
more items will be added, but when I went to:

http://www.cjh.org/about/yivo_catalog.html

in order to find out about the Berdichev films, my service provider (AOL)
had a fit and "hung" my browser when I tried doing a search using the
search button provided by the website. I did not attempt a second search
after I logged on again. Maybe those of you who would like someday to
view those films will have more luck than I did.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...

Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SHUTZ or SCHUTZ, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY,
Ostryna.


Update to my 12-20=01 Berdichev message #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

I didn't expect to update my Berdichev message of 12-20-01 so soon, but
I thought I should now do so, lest I forget to tell you what I've learned
since my message was published.

First I want to refer Berdichev genealogists to a section of Linda
Berkowitz's extraordinary "Jewish-History.com" website at:

http://jewish-history.com/Occident/volume2/nov1844/berditschew.html

I've known about Ms. Berkowitz's site for several years but have only
rarely visited it beause none of my ancestors arrived in the US before
1896, and I thought the website would not hold much interest for me. It is
largely devoted to information about Jews who came to the US much earlier
than mine and has a large section about Jews who fought in the Civil War.

But during the past couple of days, I discovered at this website a
section called "The Occident and American Jewish Advocate." Here there is
a collection of articles taken >from microfilmed copies >from a publication
that was issued in Philadelphia >from 1844-1848. I read a brief but
interesting article about Odessa's Jews, to which I've already referred
the members of the Odessa mail group at Rootsweb.com. But there is also
another brief but interesting article at the above noted URL which is
entitled "Jewish Artificers in Berditchew." After some discussion, it
presents a "statistical" paragraph about its Jewish population and the
number of Jews engaged in each of the various occupations noted.

Those of you who are interested in reading more about Russian history
may want to click on the many other articles >from the four volumes of "The
Occident. such as one showing the text of the 1827 ukase regarding
conscription, an article about the relief of 30 or so Jews >from that
ukase, and several articles about Dr. Lilienthal and his efforts and those
of other "enlightened" Jews to ameliorate the lives and living conditions
of the more unfortunate of their brethren. There are also chapters >from
an ardent Chassidic rabbi's lengthy refutation of those efforts. Also at
the same website at:

http://www.jewish-history.com/cantons.htm

is an article about the Cantonists which was written by a cantonist
soldier named Herzl Yankl Tsam. This is followed by a bibliography.

Secondly, I had written earlier that I did not know where the films
regarding Berdichev I mentioned could be found. Although I am still not
sure, I think they may be found in the film library of the National
Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University. YIVO may also have the
films I mentioned. I was recently notified by a RAV SIG member that part
of YIVO's catalogue of holdings has been put online and that eventually
more items will be added, but when I went to:

http://www.cjh.org/about/yivo_catalog.html

in order to find out about the Berdichev films, my service provider (AOL)
had a fit and "hung" my browser when I tried doing a search using the
search button provided by the website. I did not attempt a second search
after I logged on again. Maybe those of you who would like someday to
view those films will have more luck than I did.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...

Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SHUTZ or SCHUTZ, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY,
Ostryna.


Records of Amdur (Indura) Belarus #belarus

Michael Palmer <mepalmer@...>
 

Would appreciate any suggestions:

My great-grandfather, Chaim Schalmuk, lived in and/or around Amdur,
Russia. His wife and children came to the United States >from around the
turn of the century until 1913 when the last one arrived.

Chaim was a blacksmith and we know his wife and children's Hebrew names
and birthdates, but very little about their family and their past.

Is there any place in Belarus where I could write, e-mail or snail mail,
for information on Amdur residents at the turn of the century? What
types of information might be accessible? And how could I retrieve it?
(I don't know how difficult it would be for me to do the research via
email or snail mail, and since I do not speak or read Russian, is there
anyone you know who would be able to do the research for me?)
Thank you for your help.
Sincerely,
Michael Palmer
mepalmer@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Have you checked the new Archives page at
www.jewishgen.org/belarus?

SHALMUCK >from Amdur, Russia -> Middletown, Connecticut
WOLF Krynki, Poland-> Middletown, Connecticut
GLOTZER -> Pinsk, Russia->Hartford, Connecticut
KAPLAN -> Pinsk,Russia -> Hartford, Connecticut (all in the early 1900s)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Records of Amdur (Indura) Belarus #belarus

Michael Palmer <mepalmer@...>
 

Would appreciate any suggestions:

My great-grandfather, Chaim Schalmuk, lived in and/or around Amdur,
Russia. His wife and children came to the United States >from around the
turn of the century until 1913 when the last one arrived.

Chaim was a blacksmith and we know his wife and children's Hebrew names
and birthdates, but very little about their family and their past.

Is there any place in Belarus where I could write, e-mail or snail mail,
for information on Amdur residents at the turn of the century? What
types of information might be accessible? And how could I retrieve it?
(I don't know how difficult it would be for me to do the research via
email or snail mail, and since I do not speak or read Russian, is there
anyone you know who would be able to do the research for me?)
Thank you for your help.
Sincerely,
Michael Palmer
mepalmer@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Have you checked the new Archives page at
www.jewishgen.org/belarus?

SHALMUCK >from Amdur, Russia -> Middletown, Connecticut
WOLF Krynki, Poland-> Middletown, Connecticut
GLOTZER -> Pinsk, Russia->Hartford, Connecticut
KAPLAN -> Pinsk,Russia -> Hartford, Connecticut (all in the early 1900s)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Town that begins with L and ends with SI #ukraine

mhlcswc2@...
 

On the 1920 census there appears to be a town that begins with L and ends
with SI, possibly in the Ukraine. Can anyone identify it? Thanks.

GREENBERG, MALEWITZ
Marcia G. Hoffman
mhlcswc2@...
Baltimore, MD


Town that begins with L and ends with SI #ukraine

mhlcswc2@...
 

On the 1920 census there appears to be a town that begins with L and ends
with SI, possibly in the Ukraine. Can anyone identify it? Thanks.

GREENBERG, MALEWITZ
Marcia G. Hoffman
mhlcswc2@...
Baltimore, MD


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Finding female ancestor's names and information on 19th century settlement in Eretz Israel #ukraine

Risa Tzohar <rtzohar@...>
 

My maternal grandparents were >from the shtetl of Greiding in Podolya. They
were both >from the same shtetl although came to New York at different times
and were introduced and married (2nd marriage for my grandfather). My
grandmother's grandmother and several aunts and uncles also emigrated to
New York. (Her grandfather came too, but on the ship one of his sons
shaved his beard and the other one did so soon after arrival. He told the
grandmother - "I'm not staying in this treife medina" and was soon on his
way back to Greiding. My grandmother's parents stayed in Greiding along
with several other sisters and brothers. Her father died in the 30's and
her mother and many others were murdered in the forest by the Nazis.

One of the aunts told my mother this story. She remembered going to say
good-bye to her grandparents who were leaving for Eretz Israel. They were
old and would live out their years in the Holy Land and be buried there.
She went on to say that they were in touch with the grandfather and at one
point he wrote that his wife died and living alone was very difficult so he
asked his children's forgiveness but he was remarrying.

The aunt who told this story died in 1959 at the age of about 94.

When my mother retired she took a genealogy course and we both began to
think of looking for the grandfather and grandmother. Our problem was that
we did not know if the grandparents were >from her mother's side or her
father's side. My mother was able to locate the death certificate of her
great-grandmother and so we had the two possible family names for them. I
heard >from a friend that she had found her grandfather's grave on Har
Hazeitim and she gave the phone number of the Chevra Kadisha. It turned
out that they had neither of the names I was looking for but after asking
where my ancestor was >from suggested a different Chevra Kadisha. To my
amazement the second one actually had my mother's grandmother's
grandfather's name! In 1999 my mother and I took a telephone and map and
actually found the grave. Now we have the names of the men in that line.

My quest: The women don't have family names on the graves or in the Chevra
Kadisha records and I would really like to know the given name of the
grandmother. I would also be interested in finding out when they came to
Jerusalem, and in what kind of community they lived.

Where and for what kind of records would I look to find more about them?
My mother's great Aunt was born around 1865 so I would guess that if she
remembers this story it would have been somewhere after 1870. The
grandfather died in 1895 so that leaves quite a span. I know that there
were Hassidim who came in those years and this is likely since their area
had lots of Hassidim. Were there immigration records? Perhaps there are
some community records besides the burial records? Can you suggest where
to look? What books can I read about that period?

Any and all suggestions are welcome.

Thank you so much,
Risa Tzohar,
rtzohar@...
Rehovot, Israel

Looking for: DINCIN, Greiding, Ukraine; SCHWARTZ Greiding, Ukraine;
WITTELS (VITTLES) Greiding, Ukraine; REICH, Suwalki,


Finding female ancestor's names and information on 19th century settlement in Eretz Israel #ukraine

Risa Tzohar <rtzohar@...>
 

My maternal grandparents were >from the shtetl of Greiding in Podolya. They
were both >from the same shtetl although came to New York at different times
and were introduced and married (2nd marriage for my grandfather). My
grandmother's grandmother and several aunts and uncles also emigrated to
New York. (Her grandfather came too, but on the ship one of his sons
shaved his beard and the other one did so soon after arrival. He told the
grandmother - "I'm not staying in this treife medina" and was soon on his
way back to Greiding. My grandmother's parents stayed in Greiding along
with several other sisters and brothers. Her father died in the 30's and
her mother and many others were murdered in the forest by the Nazis.

One of the aunts told my mother this story. She remembered going to say
good-bye to her grandparents who were leaving for Eretz Israel. They were
old and would live out their years in the Holy Land and be buried there.
She went on to say that they were in touch with the grandfather and at one
point he wrote that his wife died and living alone was very difficult so he
asked his children's forgiveness but he was remarrying.

The aunt who told this story died in 1959 at the age of about 94.

When my mother retired she took a genealogy course and we both began to
think of looking for the grandfather and grandmother. Our problem was that
we did not know if the grandparents were >from her mother's side or her
father's side. My mother was able to locate the death certificate of her
great-grandmother and so we had the two possible family names for them. I
heard >from a friend that she had found her grandfather's grave on Har
Hazeitim and she gave the phone number of the Chevra Kadisha. It turned
out that they had neither of the names I was looking for but after asking
where my ancestor was >from suggested a different Chevra Kadisha. To my
amazement the second one actually had my mother's grandmother's
grandfather's name! In 1999 my mother and I took a telephone and map and
actually found the grave. Now we have the names of the men in that line.

My quest: The women don't have family names on the graves or in the Chevra
Kadisha records and I would really like to know the given name of the
grandmother. I would also be interested in finding out when they came to
Jerusalem, and in what kind of community they lived.

Where and for what kind of records would I look to find more about them?
My mother's great Aunt was born around 1865 so I would guess that if she
remembers this story it would have been somewhere after 1870. The
grandfather died in 1895 so that leaves quite a span. I know that there
were Hassidim who came in those years and this is likely since their area
had lots of Hassidim. Were there immigration records? Perhaps there are
some community records besides the burial records? Can you suggest where
to look? What books can I read about that period?

Any and all suggestions are welcome.

Thank you so much,
Risa Tzohar,
rtzohar@...
Rehovot, Israel

Looking for: DINCIN, Greiding, Ukraine; SCHWARTZ Greiding, Ukraine;
WITTELS (VITTLES) Greiding, Ukraine; REICH, Suwalki,