Date   

Stakliskes, Lithuania new records #lithuania

Robyn Blum <trekrobyn@...>
 

The Trakai District Research Group is happy to announce the
11th set of records has been translated and is ready to go
out to all Trakai District Research Group $100 donors. The
data contained in this set is the 1858 Revision List for the town
of Stakliskes, accounting for 766 individuals living in the
town of Stakliskes.

The following towns are part of Trakai District in Vilnius
Guberniya in Lithuania:

Alytus, Aukstadvaris, Butrimonys, Darsuniskis, Daugai,
Druskininkai, Jieznas, Merkine, Mikalavas, Miroslavas
Nemajunai, Nemunaitis, Onuskis, Paluknys, Pivasiuniai
Punia, Ratnycia, Semeliskes, Stakliskes, Trakai,
Valkininkai, Varena, Vievis, Zasliai, Ziezmariai.

The group has already translated 1858 Revision Lists from
Merkine, Ziezmariai, Alytus, Vievis, Daugai, Jieznas, Butrimonys, Zasliai,
Punia, Varena, and have all of the remaining available towns' 1858 Revision Lists already translated and in the process of being proofed (and almost ready for distribution to group members in the next few weeks):

Darsuniskis

Namujanai

Valkininkai.

Anyone who has not contributed who desires to begin
receiving your own e-mail file (completely searchable) of
the translated records, and thus becoming a member of the Trakai
Research Group, can find out how to join the group by
emailing me at:

trekrobyn@...

Thank you to all of our contributors who have made
acquisition and translation of these records possible.

Once the next town's list is ready, I will get that out to
contributors as well!

Robyn Blum
Coordinator, Trakai District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Stakliskes, Lithuania new records #lithuania

Robyn Blum <trekrobyn@...>
 

The Trakai District Research Group is happy to announce the
11th set of records has been translated and is ready to go
out to all Trakai District Research Group $100 donors. The
data contained in this set is the 1858 Revision List for the town
of Stakliskes, accounting for 766 individuals living in the
town of Stakliskes.

The following towns are part of Trakai District in Vilnius
Guberniya in Lithuania:

Alytus, Aukstadvaris, Butrimonys, Darsuniskis, Daugai,
Druskininkai, Jieznas, Merkine, Mikalavas, Miroslavas
Nemajunai, Nemunaitis, Onuskis, Paluknys, Pivasiuniai
Punia, Ratnycia, Semeliskes, Stakliskes, Trakai,
Valkininkai, Varena, Vievis, Zasliai, Ziezmariai.

The group has already translated 1858 Revision Lists from
Merkine, Ziezmariai, Alytus, Vievis, Daugai, Jieznas, Butrimonys, Zasliai,
Punia, Varena, and have all of the remaining available towns' 1858 Revision Lists already translated and in the process of being proofed (and almost ready for distribution to group members in the next few weeks):

Darsuniskis

Namujanai

Valkininkai.

Anyone who has not contributed who desires to begin
receiving your own e-mail file (completely searchable) of
the translated records, and thus becoming a member of the Trakai
Research Group, can find out how to join the group by
emailing me at:

trekrobyn@...

Thank you to all of our contributors who have made
acquisition and translation of these records possible.

Once the next town's list is ready, I will get that out to
contributors as well!

Robyn Blum
Coordinator, Trakai District Research Group


Re: [Belarus] Ggm's Maiden Name #belarus

Ruth Hyman <rhyman@...>
 

You just reminded me that I have found my great grandparents names
(including "maiden" names) on my grandparents death certificates.

Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY

<-------------------------

Herbert J: Maletz wrote:
In answer to Robyn's post:
One possible source for maiden names would be the Social Security
Application of one of the children of the lady whose maiden name you are
seeking. Both father's name and mother's maiden name are entries on the
SS Application.
------------------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: [Belarus] Ggm's Maiden Name #belarus

Ruth Hyman <rhyman@...>
 

You just reminded me that I have found my great grandparents names
(including "maiden" names) on my grandparents death certificates.

Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY

<-------------------------

Herbert J: Maletz wrote:
In answer to Robyn's post:
One possible source for maiden names would be the Social Security
Application of one of the children of the lady whose maiden name you are
seeking. Both father's name and mother's maiden name are entries on the
SS Application.
------------------------


Re: WAGES AND HOURS IN NEW YORK GARMENT INDUSTRY #belarus

Rosen20817@...
 

Elaine Siegel asks, "Does anyone have any idea how much a Presser in the garment industry would earn in 1906? How many hours per week did one work."
I have been doing research on the shirmaking industry in New york City around these years, and here are some related findings:
The median weekly wages and earnings of workers in the men's shirt industry in New York in 1914 according to the study by the New York Factory Investigating Commission was $11 for men and $6.50 for women

But a union magazine reported, "The large majority of women workers cannot earn more than $3.50 to $6 per week, while the average male receives >from $7 to $9 for his working week of more than sixty hours...(9/17/16)"

The Shirt Makers Union strike of April 1913 won a reduction of hours in the shirt industry >from 54 to 50.

On February 24, 1916, a strike by more than 20,000 workers in all branches of the shirt trade in Greater NY [including] the cutting, operating, laundry, and shipping departments of more than 175 shirt factories...[whose] work w2eek averages 55 hours as against 48 hours in all other branches of the men's and women's clothing industries. (2/25/16) Demands included a fifty hour work week, a $6 minimum wage, and a 25 percent increase in wages. Wages range >from $3 a week to $10 on the average. (3/3/16)

In December 1914, the Department of Commerce examined the books of 25 companies in New York City manufacturing shirts only, and found that their manufacturing profit was 4.2% of net sales while labor costs were 28% and raw material was about 62%. Thus profits were equivalent to about 15% of wages.

This leads me to conclude that wages were deplorably low, but low wages were caused less by high profits than by depressed prices compared to the costs of manufacturing. Since Jews were the majority of owners and also the majority of workers, this finding has important implications about the community of the time.

--Steve Rosen, Bethesda, Maryland


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: WAGES AND HOURS IN NEW YORK GARMENT INDUSTRY #belarus

Rosen20817@...
 

Elaine Siegel asks, "Does anyone have any idea how much a Presser in the garment industry would earn in 1906? How many hours per week did one work."
I have been doing research on the shirmaking industry in New york City around these years, and here are some related findings:
The median weekly wages and earnings of workers in the men's shirt industry in New York in 1914 according to the study by the New York Factory Investigating Commission was $11 for men and $6.50 for women

But a union magazine reported, "The large majority of women workers cannot earn more than $3.50 to $6 per week, while the average male receives >from $7 to $9 for his working week of more than sixty hours...(9/17/16)"

The Shirt Makers Union strike of April 1913 won a reduction of hours in the shirt industry >from 54 to 50.

On February 24, 1916, a strike by more than 20,000 workers in all branches of the shirt trade in Greater NY [including] the cutting, operating, laundry, and shipping departments of more than 175 shirt factories...[whose] work w2eek averages 55 hours as against 48 hours in all other branches of the men's and women's clothing industries. (2/25/16) Demands included a fifty hour work week, a $6 minimum wage, and a 25 percent increase in wages. Wages range >from $3 a week to $10 on the average. (3/3/16)

In December 1914, the Department of Commerce examined the books of 25 companies in New York City manufacturing shirts only, and found that their manufacturing profit was 4.2% of net sales while labor costs were 28% and raw material was about 62%. Thus profits were equivalent to about 15% of wages.

This leads me to conclude that wages were deplorably low, but low wages were caused less by high profits than by depressed prices compared to the costs of manufacturing. Since Jews were the majority of owners and also the majority of workers, this finding has important implications about the community of the time.

--Steve Rosen, Bethesda, Maryland


Moderator #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Elsebeth Paikin Moderator of the Denmark and Belarus newsgroups has kindly
agreed to moderate this newsgroup while I am away. I will be back at the
end of August. I am very grateful to her.
Arlene Beare
Moderator and President Latvia SIG


Latvia SIG #Latvia Moderator #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Elsebeth Paikin Moderator of the Denmark and Belarus newsgroups has kindly
agreed to moderate this newsgroup while I am away. I will be back at the
end of August. I am very grateful to her.
Arlene Beare
Moderator and President Latvia SIG


1906 Novogrodok Uyezd Duma List, Q-Z #belarus

Bernie Hirsch <bernie06@...>
 

Hi,

Is there a way to find an age or date on a name in the 1906
Novogrodok Uyezd Duma List?

Srebnik Girsh Elev 2656
Srebnik Shmuilo Girshev 2668

Many thanks for any help!

I just found my Samuel Silverman (SREBNIK) on the 1920 Brooklyn
Census and it listed his date of immigration as 1911.

--
Kind regards,
Bernie Hirsch


Belarus SIG #Belarus 1906 Novogrodok Uyezd Duma List, Q-Z #belarus

Bernie Hirsch <bernie06@...>
 

Hi,

Is there a way to find an age or date on a name in the 1906
Novogrodok Uyezd Duma List?

Srebnik Girsh Elev 2656
Srebnik Shmuilo Girshev 2668

Many thanks for any help!

I just found my Samuel Silverman (SREBNIK) on the 1920 Brooklyn
Census and it listed his date of immigration as 1911.

--
Kind regards,
Bernie Hirsch


It's All Relative: English mysteries - Jerusalem Post genealogy article -Aug 16 #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

It's All Relative: English mysteries
By Schelly Talalay Dardashti
(August 16)

The recent 21st international Jewish genealogy conference
in London resulted in surprising discoveries for those with
English roots.

http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2001/08/16/JewishWorld/JewishWorld.32760.html

Note: At bottom of the page... you can click on several other
recent "It's All Relative" genealogy related articles.
--
koosh@...
Bernard Kouchel


Re: Name KARMELIK #general

hennynow
 

I was going to suggest that "Karmelik" might derive >from Mt. Carmel in
Haifa, but Naomi Fatouros's suggestion of "caramel" as in "candy
manufacturing" is so much sweeter. As a note, my late uncle Paul Moed
did have a chocolate factory in Palestine around 1920.

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


Re: location of Garnatz, Russia #general

hennynow
 

Do you think the shtetl might be present-day Goniadz in Poland? Other
names for that shtetl are "Goniodz" or "Goniondz." You will find a Yizkor
Book, with an English article on "Our Hometown Goniodz, Province of
Bialystok, Poland," under
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/Goniadz.html

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen It's All Relative: English mysteries - Jerusalem Post genealogy article -Aug 16 #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

It's All Relative: English mysteries
By Schelly Talalay Dardashti
(August 16)

The recent 21st international Jewish genealogy conference
in London resulted in surprising discoveries for those with
English roots.

http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2001/08/16/JewishWorld/JewishWorld.32760.html

Note: At bottom of the page... you can click on several other
recent "It's All Relative" genealogy related articles.
--
koosh@...
Bernard Kouchel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: location of Garnatz, Russia #general

hennynow
 

Do you think the shtetl might be present-day Goniadz in Poland? Other
names for that shtetl are "Goniodz" or "Goniondz." You will find a Yizkor
Book, with an English article on "Our Hometown Goniodz, Province of
Bialystok, Poland," under
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/Goniadz.html

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name KARMELIK #general

hennynow
 

I was going to suggest that "Karmelik" might derive >from Mt. Carmel in
Haifa, but Naomi Fatouros's suggestion of "caramel" as in "candy
manufacturing" is so much sweeter. As a note, my late uncle Paul Moed
did have a chocolate factory in Palestine around 1920.

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


Were passengers required to present proof of identity? #general

Sally Goodman <sdgoody@...>
 

Mitch Stone's final questions prompt me to present the mystery of my
father arrival in the US and ask for help.

"I've often wondered if Jews did not sometimes emigrate under assumed,
temporary identities. If the information on the passenger lists were not
derived >from travel documents, where did it come from? Was a passenger
required to present any proof of identity? <

My father's name >from the day he arrived in the US was Felix BERG born in
Berlin. I recently learned he was born Sunio MANDELBERG, son of Josef,
grandson of Salomon, in Jaroslau.

Felix BERG's Intent, Declaration and Naturalization papers all indicate he
arrived in NYC on the SS La Lorraine, 7 Dec. 1920. However, none of his
"names" appear on that ship manifest. I checked it in NY, in WDC and now on
the EIDB. A Salomon MANDELBERG's name appears on the ship manifest of the
SS Berengaria arriving in NYC 22 Nov. 1924. All the information on the
EIDB is correct in describing my father including the address of his
nearest relative, his mother, in Vienna. However, Salomon Mandelberg's
name is crossed out and at the end of the page there is a notation that he
did not embark.

Can somebody explain how a man can arrive in the US in 1920 and his name
not (none of them) appear on the ship manifest (there is an index card for
him)? And, how can this same man appear on a ship 4 years later using the
name of his deceased grandfather but never get on the ship?

Thank you.
Sally Goodman
Palm Springs/LA CA
Please Use Following Email: sbgoody@...

Rearching: ABELES, KIRSCHBAUM, MANDELBERG, MENKES, MUHLSTEIN, NEUSPIEL,
ROTH, SCHAUER-Kittsee, Jaroslau, Rzeszow, Sieniawa, Nikolsburg/Mikulov,
Eisgrub/Lednice, Berlin, Vienna, Aspern, Hollabrunn; RESZAWO (RESHOWER):
Austria, NYC; STEIN-Stryj; SELIGMANN-Germany, NYC; GOITMAN-Kishinev; HAYS-
Germany, England, Louisiana, NYC; CARDOZO-England, Louisiana, NYC


Re: Immigration #austria-czech

Joan Silverman <jbsilverman@...>
 

To all who have taken the time to answer my question, thanks so much. Your
suggestions are very helpful.

Joan Silverman
Revere, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Immigration #general

Joan Silverman <jbsilverman@...>
 

To all who have taken the time to answer my question, thanks so much. Your
suggestions are very helpful.

Joan Silverman
Revere, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Were passengers required to present proof of identity? #general

Sally Goodman <sdgoody@...>
 

Mitch Stone's final questions prompt me to present the mystery of my
father arrival in the US and ask for help.

"I've often wondered if Jews did not sometimes emigrate under assumed,
temporary identities. If the information on the passenger lists were not
derived >from travel documents, where did it come from? Was a passenger
required to present any proof of identity? <

My father's name >from the day he arrived in the US was Felix BERG born in
Berlin. I recently learned he was born Sunio MANDELBERG, son of Josef,
grandson of Salomon, in Jaroslau.

Felix BERG's Intent, Declaration and Naturalization papers all indicate he
arrived in NYC on the SS La Lorraine, 7 Dec. 1920. However, none of his
"names" appear on that ship manifest. I checked it in NY, in WDC and now on
the EIDB. A Salomon MANDELBERG's name appears on the ship manifest of the
SS Berengaria arriving in NYC 22 Nov. 1924. All the information on the
EIDB is correct in describing my father including the address of his
nearest relative, his mother, in Vienna. However, Salomon Mandelberg's
name is crossed out and at the end of the page there is a notation that he
did not embark.

Can somebody explain how a man can arrive in the US in 1920 and his name
not (none of them) appear on the ship manifest (there is an index card for
him)? And, how can this same man appear on a ship 4 years later using the
name of his deceased grandfather but never get on the ship?

Thank you.
Sally Goodman
Palm Springs/LA CA
Please Use Following Email: sbgoody@...

Rearching: ABELES, KIRSCHBAUM, MANDELBERG, MENKES, MUHLSTEIN, NEUSPIEL,
ROTH, SCHAUER-Kittsee, Jaroslau, Rzeszow, Sieniawa, Nikolsburg/Mikulov,
Eisgrub/Lednice, Berlin, Vienna, Aspern, Hollabrunn; RESZAWO (RESHOWER):
Austria, NYC; STEIN-Stryj; SELIGMANN-Germany, NYC; GOITMAN-Kishinev; HAYS-
Germany, England, Louisiana, NYC; CARDOZO-England, Louisiana, NYC