Date   

location of vital records for Augustow #poland

Lillian Faffer
 

The Suwalk Archive (Polish State regional archive) does not have vital
records for this town prior to 1867. Has anyone found a source for
earlier records for Augustow ?
Lillian Faffer

lfaffer@juno.com

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS >from JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


JRI Poland #Poland location of vital records for Augustow #poland

Lillian Faffer
 

The Suwalk Archive (Polish State regional archive) does not have vital
records for this town prior to 1867. Has anyone found a source for
earlier records for Augustow ?
Lillian Faffer

lfaffer@juno.com

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS >from JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


Kishinev #ukraine

Eileen Starr <starreil@...>
 

I've had the same question re Kishinev that David Sitomer raised.

Jacob BISNOSKY (named changed to ROSENBERG) & family settled in NYC,
arriving >from Shumsk, Ukraine, near Kremenets,
1898 Jacob & 2 children
Sophie m-Solomon KAUFMAN,
Harry m Tillie STEIN
1901 wife Esther GIDANSKY & 3 children
Celia m-Louis ACKERMAN, then Isadore STEINMAN
Joseph m-Rebecca BORUD,
Julius, my father, m-Frances KRONBERGER

from Kesinoff or Kishinev1908 Benjamin REGAL & wife Hinda GIDANSKY
(sister of Esther GIDANSKY BISNOSKY changed to ROSENBERG) arrived in NYC
with
5 year old daughter Sarah m-READMAN (sp?)
3 year old son Nathan (Ophthalmologist - Manhattan until
1990; m-Ann BRITT
infant son Louis m-Esther
In conversations with Nathan (who died in 1993), he always firmly
maintained that he had come >from Kesinoff or Kishinev; he didn't know
the spelling - when I tried to suggest that he came >from Kremenets.
The location baffles me.

I think that these 2 related families - Jacob's & Benjamin's were close
in proximity.
In NYC, Julius in his adulthood maintained a business with his brother
Joseph and always had a job for elderly Benjamin, his uncle.

No map that I've seen has given me hope that Kishinev or any spelling
variation was located near Shumsk. Now with David's question, I'm
wondering if someone has another view.



Eileen Starr
West Linn, Oregon


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Kishinev #ukraine

Eileen Starr <starreil@...>
 

I've had the same question re Kishinev that David Sitomer raised.

Jacob BISNOSKY (named changed to ROSENBERG) & family settled in NYC,
arriving >from Shumsk, Ukraine, near Kremenets,
1898 Jacob & 2 children
Sophie m-Solomon KAUFMAN,
Harry m Tillie STEIN
1901 wife Esther GIDANSKY & 3 children
Celia m-Louis ACKERMAN, then Isadore STEINMAN
Joseph m-Rebecca BORUD,
Julius, my father, m-Frances KRONBERGER

from Kesinoff or Kishinev1908 Benjamin REGAL & wife Hinda GIDANSKY
(sister of Esther GIDANSKY BISNOSKY changed to ROSENBERG) arrived in NYC
with
5 year old daughter Sarah m-READMAN (sp?)
3 year old son Nathan (Ophthalmologist - Manhattan until
1990; m-Ann BRITT
infant son Louis m-Esther
In conversations with Nathan (who died in 1993), he always firmly
maintained that he had come >from Kesinoff or Kishinev; he didn't know
the spelling - when I tried to suggest that he came >from Kremenets.
The location baffles me.

I think that these 2 related families - Jacob's & Benjamin's were close
in proximity.
In NYC, Julius in his adulthood maintained a business with his brother
Joseph and always had a job for elderly Benjamin, his uncle.

No map that I've seen has given me hope that Kishinev or any spelling
variation was located near Shumsk. Now with David's question, I'm
wondering if someone has another view.



Eileen Starr
West Linn, Oregon


Re: Understanding a Romanian Name #general

Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Mon, 5 Mar 2001 14:56:10, PJL427@aol.com opined:

Janculovici is not a Slavic Patronimic. The ici at the end is the Romanian
suffix that means son of. Other Romanian forms would be Rabinovici,
Berkovici, Abramovici and sometimes they used "cu" such as Lazarescu,
Anotonescu, etc.
You may have noticed that the "-ovici" suffix is pronounced "-ovitch".
A Russian son of a Berk. Abram, or Lazar would be Berkovitch,
Abramovitch, or Lazarovitch (just as a son of Ivan is Ivanovitch, and
the son of the Czar is the Czarevitch); I wouild be happy to be told
why this does not make these names patronymics. The "-ovici" spelling
is a consequence of the way the "tch" phoneme is rendered in Romanian
orthography, and does not change the fact that these are Slavic
patronymics (note spelling). For that matter, the "-tch" is merely a
way that English renders the Cyrillic letter for the phoneme.

The "-escu" suffix is adjectival. It means the same thing as similar
sounding suffixes in English (-ish), German (-isch), Swedish (-isk),
French (-esque), Slavic (-ski), and many other Indo-European
languages.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: To send me email, please delete the REMOVE_THIS >from my
address.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please continue this linguistic debate privately.
Further comments with new information about genealogical aspects of
this discussion will be considered for posting.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Understanding a Romanian Name #general

Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Mon, 5 Mar 2001 14:56:10, PJL427@aol.com opined:

Janculovici is not a Slavic Patronimic. The ici at the end is the Romanian
suffix that means son of. Other Romanian forms would be Rabinovici,
Berkovici, Abramovici and sometimes they used "cu" such as Lazarescu,
Anotonescu, etc.
You may have noticed that the "-ovici" suffix is pronounced "-ovitch".
A Russian son of a Berk. Abram, or Lazar would be Berkovitch,
Abramovitch, or Lazarovitch (just as a son of Ivan is Ivanovitch, and
the son of the Czar is the Czarevitch); I wouild be happy to be told
why this does not make these names patronymics. The "-ovici" spelling
is a consequence of the way the "tch" phoneme is rendered in Romanian
orthography, and does not change the fact that these are Slavic
patronymics (note spelling). For that matter, the "-tch" is merely a
way that English renders the Cyrillic letter for the phoneme.

The "-escu" suffix is adjectival. It means the same thing as similar
sounding suffixes in English (-ish), German (-isch), Swedish (-isk),
French (-esque), Slavic (-ski), and many other Indo-European
languages.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: To send me email, please delete the REMOVE_THIS >from my
address.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please continue this linguistic debate privately.
Further comments with new information about genealogical aspects of
this discussion will be considered for posting.


March issue of Shemot #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

The March issue of Shemot, the journal of the JGS of Great Britain, will be
out this week.

We are aiming to support the many genealogists we expect in London for the
International Conference in July, with articles in this issue and the next
on some of the major resources in the capital and guidance in using them.

This issue includes articles on how to find your ancestors graves in the
London area, and the resources of the Tower Hamlets Local History Library in
the East End. Other articles are on temporary shelters in the 19th and early
20th century, including the famous Poor Jews' Temporary Shelter in London;
producing a family newsletter; producing a family book; family connections
with Charles Dickens; Dayan Aaron Levy; a visit to Annopol, Poland.

The June issue will include items on the London Metropolitan Archives, the
Guildhall Library and marriage records.

Visit our Web site <http://www.ort.org/jgsgb> where among other things you
can find a list of articles published in previous issues. These include
recent articles on the Wiener Library; enemy alien records at the Public
Records Office; WWI records; medical records; passenger lists; the LDS
Family History Centre; the Family Records Centre. There is also information
on membership which will entitle you to your own current and future copies.

David Fielker
Editor: Shemot
JGS of Gt Britain


Naturalization in California #general

Howard Zakai
 

Genners,
I was wondering how I could obtain naturalization records for my
great-grandfather's brother who seems to have moved out to California
sometime in the 1930s. I will check if he was naturalized in NY before then,
but I was wondering how to do so if he became citizen after he moved to CA.
And for that matter, naturalizations within Pennsylvania as well.

Thanks in advance!!
Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


Missouri death certificates #general

mleonards . <mleonards@...>
 

I'm trying to find the death certificate for a great-great uncle who lived
and was buried in Springfield, Illinois. According to the cemetary in
Springfield, he died in early 1955. I've tried the Illinois death records
twice now, and have not found him.

So, thinking that perhaps he was living with/near one of his daughters in
St. Louis, Missouri, I'm going to try there. I have his date of death, and
approximate birth year, but little else. I don't know his daughters'
addresses in St. Louis.

It appears that one can order death certificates >from either the State of
Missouri or St. Louis County. Has anyone had experience with these offices?
Which will respond more quickly? What is the usual turn-around time?

Thanks for any information.
Monica Leonards
Glenside, Pennsylvania, USA


FEUCHTWANGER family tree? #general

MBernet@...
 

I'm seeking information on the FEUCHTWANGER family.

My great-grandmother Leah FEUCHTWANGER was born in Schabach, 1850, and died
in Fuerth in 1919.

Her father Nathan, and grandfather Meier FEUCHTWANGER, were community
leaders in Schwabach (south of Nurnberg) and I believe there were also some
rabbis in the family with connections to Munich. Her mother was Rosette
ORDENSTEIN.

Is there a FEUCHTWANGER family tree or a family history?

I also wonder whether the writer Lion Feuchtwanger belongs to the same family.

I appreciate any help

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


The Rashi Connection #general

A.R. Liboff <liboff@...>
 

Concerning the Askenazic connection to Rashi, the mathematics is not too
difficult to follow, and is rather interesting for reasons other than
merely wondering whether we are all related to a great leader. Actually,
some years ago I posted this amazing little calculation on JewishGen, and
would like to present it again.

Approximately 1000 years have passed since Rashi died. If we assume that
there are at least 5 generations every 100 years, then about 50 generations
have happened since Rashi's time. If one wishes, we can assume even a
greater number of generations, but it really does not affect the conclusion
very much.

For 50 generations the number of people who have come before each of us
(that is parents, grandparents, ggparents, gggp) is 2 + 4 + 8 +16 +...+
2^50, where the last number is 2 raised to the 50th power. It happens that
2^50 is such a large number that it is greater by far than all the people
who have ever lived on earth, up to the present time. (Indeed 2^50 equals
approximately 1 followed by 15 zeros!) This implies that interrelated
intermarriage among Jews has been so great over the past 1000 years that it
is quite possible that the entire European Jewish population has been
interconnected during the past 1000 years, regardless of whatever ties we
may have all had even prior to the Diaspora.

There is still another aspect to these numbers, one that has to do with our
Christian neighbors in Europe. Consider the rate of loss of Jews to the
outside community through intermarriage, a rate that is hard to specify
precisely, but at times may have been as high as 50&. One therefore can ask
about the role that this Jewish infusion might have had on the European
population over the centuries.The enormous numbers of ancestors spanning
1000 years perhaps make it likely that Christians who were partly Jewish
repeatedly married other Christians who were also partly Jewish, and so
forth.It may be reasonable to consider the possibility that in certain
regions of Europe, especially in Germany and Poland, where Jews have lived
for many centuries, since the time of Rashi, there are many more people
related to us than anyone talks about. Perhaps future DNA analysis will
help in resolving such issues.

Anyway, it is amusing to see how many of us are desirous of attaching
ourselves to great people such as Rashi. I wonder if it means less if we
are all connected to him.

Abe Liboff
liboff@oakland.edu
Rochester Hills, MI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen March issue of Shemot #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

The March issue of Shemot, the journal of the JGS of Great Britain, will be
out this week.

We are aiming to support the many genealogists we expect in London for the
International Conference in July, with articles in this issue and the next
on some of the major resources in the capital and guidance in using them.

This issue includes articles on how to find your ancestors graves in the
London area, and the resources of the Tower Hamlets Local History Library in
the East End. Other articles are on temporary shelters in the 19th and early
20th century, including the famous Poor Jews' Temporary Shelter in London;
producing a family newsletter; producing a family book; family connections
with Charles Dickens; Dayan Aaron Levy; a visit to Annopol, Poland.

The June issue will include items on the London Metropolitan Archives, the
Guildhall Library and marriage records.

Visit our Web site <http://www.ort.org/jgsgb> where among other things you
can find a list of articles published in previous issues. These include
recent articles on the Wiener Library; enemy alien records at the Public
Records Office; WWI records; medical records; passenger lists; the LDS
Family History Centre; the Family Records Centre. There is also information
on membership which will entitle you to your own current and future copies.

David Fielker
Editor: Shemot
JGS of Gt Britain


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization in California #general

Howard Zakai
 

Genners,
I was wondering how I could obtain naturalization records for my
great-grandfather's brother who seems to have moved out to California
sometime in the 1930s. I will check if he was naturalized in NY before then,
but I was wondering how to do so if he became citizen after he moved to CA.
And for that matter, naturalizations within Pennsylvania as well.

Thanks in advance!!
Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Missouri death certificates #general

mleonards . <mleonards@...>
 

I'm trying to find the death certificate for a great-great uncle who lived
and was buried in Springfield, Illinois. According to the cemetary in
Springfield, he died in early 1955. I've tried the Illinois death records
twice now, and have not found him.

So, thinking that perhaps he was living with/near one of his daughters in
St. Louis, Missouri, I'm going to try there. I have his date of death, and
approximate birth year, but little else. I don't know his daughters'
addresses in St. Louis.

It appears that one can order death certificates >from either the State of
Missouri or St. Louis County. Has anyone had experience with these offices?
Which will respond more quickly? What is the usual turn-around time?

Thanks for any information.
Monica Leonards
Glenside, Pennsylvania, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FEUCHTWANGER family tree? #general

MBernet@...
 

I'm seeking information on the FEUCHTWANGER family.

My great-grandmother Leah FEUCHTWANGER was born in Schabach, 1850, and died
in Fuerth in 1919.

Her father Nathan, and grandfather Meier FEUCHTWANGER, were community
leaders in Schwabach (south of Nurnberg) and I believe there were also some
rabbis in the family with connections to Munich. Her mother was Rosette
ORDENSTEIN.

Is there a FEUCHTWANGER family tree or a family history?

I also wonder whether the writer Lion Feuchtwanger belongs to the same family.

I appreciate any help

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Rashi Connection #general

A.R. Liboff <liboff@...>
 

Concerning the Askenazic connection to Rashi, the mathematics is not too
difficult to follow, and is rather interesting for reasons other than
merely wondering whether we are all related to a great leader. Actually,
some years ago I posted this amazing little calculation on JewishGen, and
would like to present it again.

Approximately 1000 years have passed since Rashi died. If we assume that
there are at least 5 generations every 100 years, then about 50 generations
have happened since Rashi's time. If one wishes, we can assume even a
greater number of generations, but it really does not affect the conclusion
very much.

For 50 generations the number of people who have come before each of us
(that is parents, grandparents, ggparents, gggp) is 2 + 4 + 8 +16 +...+
2^50, where the last number is 2 raised to the 50th power. It happens that
2^50 is such a large number that it is greater by far than all the people
who have ever lived on earth, up to the present time. (Indeed 2^50 equals
approximately 1 followed by 15 zeros!) This implies that interrelated
intermarriage among Jews has been so great over the past 1000 years that it
is quite possible that the entire European Jewish population has been
interconnected during the past 1000 years, regardless of whatever ties we
may have all had even prior to the Diaspora.

There is still another aspect to these numbers, one that has to do with our
Christian neighbors in Europe. Consider the rate of loss of Jews to the
outside community through intermarriage, a rate that is hard to specify
precisely, but at times may have been as high as 50&. One therefore can ask
about the role that this Jewish infusion might have had on the European
population over the centuries.The enormous numbers of ancestors spanning
1000 years perhaps make it likely that Christians who were partly Jewish
repeatedly married other Christians who were also partly Jewish, and so
forth.It may be reasonable to consider the possibility that in certain
regions of Europe, especially in Germany and Poland, where Jews have lived
for many centuries, since the time of Rashi, there are many more people
related to us than anyone talks about. Perhaps future DNA analysis will
help in resolving such issues.

Anyway, it is amusing to see how many of us are desirous of attaching
ourselves to great people such as Rashi. I wonder if it means less if we
are all connected to him.

Abe Liboff
liboff@oakland.edu
Rochester Hills, MI


February 2001 report #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

--============_-1228305927==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

February 2001 update for Yizkor Book Project

How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month? On the one
hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor books
and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages. To all of them my heartiest
congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication to
unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.

February is always a short month. Nevertheless, we added 7 new books
and updated 13 others, a great achievement. The first translated
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura, went online on the
last day of February. We are still trying to determine the best way
to list all the translated chapters >from this massive encyclopedia,
so be sure to check under different categories until we post a
message notifying you how these translations will be categorized on
the index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html.

New Books:

Gostynin, Poland
Meretch, Lithuania
Pinsk, Belarus
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot
Turka, Ukraine
Volozhin, Belarus

Updated Books:

Bedzin, Poland
Bukowina, 2 entries : chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz), Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)
Chortkov, Ukraine
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drohiczhn, Belarus
Kolomyya, Ukraine
Kurzeniac, Beklarus
Oswiecim, Poland
Radomsko, Poland
Rzeszow, Poland
Svencionys, Lithuania
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)

As always I would like to call your attention to the yizkor book
fundraising projects which need your support. Many of our yizkor
books can be translated only by professional translators who are paid
for their remarkable work. If you have been helped by these
translations, please show your appreciation by providing financial
support so that more can be translated and put online. Some of the
projects are languishing because of a lack of funds. We know you
are reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on
the yizkor book web site in February.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Brest, Belarus
Brzeziny, Poland
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
Kremenets, Ukraine
Krynki, Poland
Lancut, Poland
Maramures Region
Moravia
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rokiskis,Lithuania
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova
Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org

--============_-1228305927==_ma============
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { margin-top: 0 ; margin-bottom: 0 }
--></style><title>February 2001 report</title></head><body>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">February 2001 update for
Yizkor Book Project<br>
<br>
How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month?&nbsp; On the
one hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor
books and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages.&nbsp; To all of them my
heartiest congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication
to unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.<br>
<br>
February is always a short month.&nbsp; Nevertheless, we added 7 new
books and updated 13 others, a great achievement.&nbsp; The first
translated chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura,&nbsp; went
online on the last day of February.&nbsp; We are still trying to
determine the best way to list all the translated chapters >from this
massive encyclopedia, so be sure to check under different categories
until we post a message notifying you how these translations will be
categorized on the index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translat<span
</span>ions.html.<br>
<br>
New Books:<br>
<br>
Gostynin, Poland<br>
Meretch, Lithuania<br>
Pinsk, Belarus<br>
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland<br>
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot<br>
Turka, Ukraine<br>
Volozhin, Belarus<br>
<br>
Updated Books:<br>
<br>
Bedzin, Poland</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Bukowina, 2 entries :
chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz<font size="+1">),</font> Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Chortkov, Ukraine<br>
Dokshitsy, Belarus<br>
Drohiczhn, Belarus<br>
Kolomyya, Ukraine<br>
Kurzeniac, Beklarus<br>
Oswiecim, Poland<br>
Radomsko, Poland<br>
Rzeszow, Poland<br>
Svencionys, Lithuania<br>
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)</font><br>
<font face="Arial" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">As always I would like to
call your attention to the yizkor book fundraising projects which
need your support.&nbsp; Many of our yizkor books can be translated
only by professional translators who are paid for their remarkable
work.&nbsp; If you have been helped by these translations, please
show your appreciation by providing financial support so that more
can be translated and put online.&nbsp; Some of the projects are
languishing because of a lack of funds.&nbsp; We know you&nbsp; are
reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on the
yizkor book web site in February.&nbsp;</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000"><br>
Bolekhov, Ukraine<font size="+1"><br>
</font>Brest, Belarus<br>
Brzeziny, Poland<br>
Buchach, Ukraine<br>
Chelm, Poland<br>
Czyzew, Poland<br>
Dokshitsy, Belarus<br>
Drogichin, Belarus<br>
Gargzdai, Lithuania<br>
Goniadz, Poland<br>
Gorodenka, Ukraine<br>
Gorodok, Ukraine<br>
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine<br>
Kremenets, Ukraine<br>
Krynki, Poland<br>
Lancut, Poland<br>
Maramures Region<br>
Moravia<br>
Przemysl, Poland<br>
Pulawy, Poland<br>
Rokiskis,Lithuania<br>
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine<br>
Rzeszow, Poland<br>
Slutsk, Belarus<br>
Sochaczew, Poland<br>

Stawiski, Poland<br>
Telekhany, Belarus<br>
Wolbrom, Poland<br>
Yedintsy, Moldova<br>
Zgierz, Poland</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Joyce Field</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Yizkor Book Project
Manager</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">jfield@jewishgen.org<br>
</font></div>
</body>
</html>
--============_-1228305927==_ma============--


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks February 2001 report #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

--============_-1228305927==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

February 2001 update for Yizkor Book Project

How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month? On the one
hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor books
and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages. To all of them my heartiest
congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication to
unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.

February is always a short month. Nevertheless, we added 7 new books
and updated 13 others, a great achievement. The first translated
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura, went online on the
last day of February. We are still trying to determine the best way
to list all the translated chapters >from this massive encyclopedia,
so be sure to check under different categories until we post a
message notifying you how these translations will be categorized on
the index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html.

New Books:

Gostynin, Poland
Meretch, Lithuania
Pinsk, Belarus
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot
Turka, Ukraine
Volozhin, Belarus

Updated Books:

Bedzin, Poland
Bukowina, 2 entries : chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz), Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)
Chortkov, Ukraine
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drohiczhn, Belarus
Kolomyya, Ukraine
Kurzeniac, Beklarus
Oswiecim, Poland
Radomsko, Poland
Rzeszow, Poland
Svencionys, Lithuania
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)

As always I would like to call your attention to the yizkor book
fundraising projects which need your support. Many of our yizkor
books can be translated only by professional translators who are paid
for their remarkable work. If you have been helped by these
translations, please show your appreciation by providing financial
support so that more can be translated and put online. Some of the
projects are languishing because of a lack of funds. We know you
are reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on
the yizkor book web site in February.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Brest, Belarus
Brzeziny, Poland
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
Kremenets, Ukraine
Krynki, Poland
Lancut, Poland
Maramures Region
Moravia
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rokiskis,Lithuania
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova
Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org

--============_-1228305927==_ma============
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { margin-top: 0 ; margin-bottom: 0 }
--></style><title>February 2001 report</title></head><body>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">February 2001 update for
Yizkor Book Project<br>
<br>
How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month?&nbsp; On the
one hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor
books and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages.&nbsp; To all of them my
heartiest congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication
to unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.<br>
<br>
February is always a short month.&nbsp; Nevertheless, we added 7 new
books and updated 13 others, a great achievement.&nbsp; The first
translated chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura,&nbsp; went
online on the last day of February.&nbsp; We are still trying to
determine the best way to list all the translated chapters >from this
massive encyclopedia, so be sure to check under different categories
until we post a message notifying you how these translations will be
categorized on the index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translat<span
</span>ions.html.<br>
<br>
New Books:<br>
<br>
Gostynin, Poland<br>
Meretch, Lithuania<br>
Pinsk, Belarus<br>
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland<br>
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot<br>
Turka, Ukraine<br>
Volozhin, Belarus<br>
<br>
Updated Books:<br>
<br>
Bedzin, Poland</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Bukowina, 2 entries :
chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz<font size="+1">),</font> Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Chortkov, Ukraine<br>
Dokshitsy, Belarus<br>
Drohiczhn, Belarus<br>
Kolomyya, Ukraine<br>
Kurzeniac, Beklarus<br>
Oswiecim, Poland<br>
Radomsko, Poland<br>
Rzeszow, Poland<br>
Svencionys, Lithuania<br>
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)</font><br>
<font face="Arial" color="#000000"></font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">As always I would like to
call your attention to the yizkor book fundraising projects which
need your support.&nbsp; Many of our yizkor books can be translated
only by professional translators who are paid for their remarkable
work.&nbsp; If you have been helped by these translations, please
show your appreciation by providing financial support so that more
can be translated and put online.&nbsp; Some of the projects are
languishing because of a lack of funds.&nbsp; We know you&nbsp; are
reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on the
yizkor book web site in February.&nbsp;</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000"><br>
Bolekhov, Ukraine<font size="+1"><br>
</font>Brest, Belarus<br>
Brzeziny, Poland<br>
Buchach, Ukraine<br>
Chelm, Poland<br>
Czyzew, Poland<br>
Dokshitsy, Belarus<br>
Drogichin, Belarus<br>
Gargzdai, Lithuania<br>
Goniadz, Poland<br>
Gorodenka, Ukraine<br>
Gorodok, Ukraine<br>
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine<br>
Kremenets, Ukraine<br>
Krynki, Poland<br>
Lancut, Poland<br>
Maramures Region<br>
Moravia<br>
Przemysl, Poland<br>
Pulawy, Poland<br>
Rokiskis,Lithuania<br>
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine<br>
Rzeszow, Poland<br>
Slutsk, Belarus<br>
Sochaczew, Poland<br>

Stawiski, Poland<br>
Telekhany, Belarus<br>
Wolbrom, Poland<br>
Yedintsy, Moldova<br>
Zgierz, Poland</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Joyce Field</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">Yizkor Book Project
Manager</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial" color="#000000">jfield@jewishgen.org<br>
</font></div>
</body>
</html>
--============_-1228305927==_ma============--


Grechevsky/Greek #ukraine

Mark Saul <MSaul@...>
 

Message text written by Eve Greenfield
I did have a half-Greek friend who studied in Russia
with me, though, who said her Greek mom had some
distant relatives near Odessa who were part of a Greek
colony that had been there for hundreds of years. <

In fact, maybe thousands. The northern shore of
the Black Sea was colonized by Greeks very early. I have tried in vain to get information on this, other than some bits and pieces >from linguistic
maps or historical atlases.


Does anyone know if there was a continuous Greek community in the Southern Ukraine >from ancient times? Or was the colonization more recent?


In another matter, I have seen references to a Bulgarian-speaking community in the Southwestern Ukraine. Are these immigrants >from Turkish persecution? Or remnants of a geographically contiguous Bulgarian
population later split apart by Romanian speakers?

The chronology doesn't seem right for the latter. Can anyone speak to this?


Mark Saul,

New York, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Fwd: Grechevsky/Greek #ukraine

Mark Saul <MSaul@...>
 

Message text written by Eve Greenfield
I did have a half-Greek friend who studied in Russia
with me, though, who said her Greek mom had some
distant relatives near Odessa who were part of a Greek
colony that had been there for hundreds of years. <

In fact, maybe thousands. The northern shore of
the Black Sea was colonized by Greeks very early. I have tried in vain to get information on this, other than some bits and pieces >from linguistic
maps or historical atlases.


Does anyone know if there was a continuous Greek community in the Southern Ukraine >from ancient times? Or was the colonization more recent?


In another matter, I have seen references to a Bulgarian-speaking community in the Southwestern Ukraine. Are these immigrants >from Turkish persecution? Or remnants of a geographically contiguous Bulgarian
population later split apart by Romanian speakers?

The chronology doesn't seem right for the latter. Can anyone speak to this?


Mark Saul,

New York, NY