Date   

Another Boring Title: Family Names Researching #hungary

ShifBe@...
 

The following are the family names that I am trying to get more information
on:

On my dad's side can only go back to my great grandfather Yankel Kornfeld.
He had four children. No date.
Believe born in Bartsfeld. His wife's name was Chana and she lived to 106
years old!

One of his sons, My grandfather Elimelech Shmuel Kornfeld also born in
Bardejob but then moved to Ungvar. Married Sheindel (Zeni) Glanz. I don't
know who her mom was. Believe >from Porowtz or Darotz. They owned a store that
sold porcelin and crystal.

On my mom's paternal side can only go back to my great grandfather Hershel
Oestsricher. Lived in Munkach then moved to Belgium and passed away >from
stomach cancer. Wife was Blima-Sara. Have no idea what her maiden name was
or anything. Her son Pinchas was my grandfather. His daughter my mom is Lea
Oestricher.

Her maternal side can only go back to great grandfather Menachim Weinberger
married to Chaya Lebowitz. They ran a vineyard in Seredna. My grandmother
Shifra (Cili) was her daughter.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Another Boring Title: Family Names Researching #hungary

ShifBe@...
 

The following are the family names that I am trying to get more information
on:

On my dad's side can only go back to my great grandfather Yankel Kornfeld.
He had four children. No date.
Believe born in Bartsfeld. His wife's name was Chana and she lived to 106
years old!

One of his sons, My grandfather Elimelech Shmuel Kornfeld also born in
Bardejob but then moved to Ungvar. Married Sheindel (Zeni) Glanz. I don't
know who her mom was. Believe >from Porowtz or Darotz. They owned a store that
sold porcelin and crystal.

On my mom's paternal side can only go back to my great grandfather Hershel
Oestsricher. Lived in Munkach then moved to Belgium and passed away >from
stomach cancer. Wife was Blima-Sara. Have no idea what her maiden name was
or anything. Her son Pinchas was my grandfather. His daughter my mom is Lea
Oestricher.

Her maternal side can only go back to great grandfather Menachim Weinberger
married to Chaya Lebowitz. They ran a vineyard in Seredna. My grandmother
Shifra (Cili) was her daughter.


Re: Lithuanian State Historical Archives1 #general

Arnold Davidson <arnoldbd@...>
 

I have always sent a personal check, which they appear to have cashed with
no problem. As to turnaround time, I think it took about 9 months for them
to respond to my first request, which was about 4-5 years ago. More
recently, turnaround has been about 2 months or less but I don't know if
this is because of a difference in initial response versus follow-up
communications.

Arnold Davidson

At 12:00 AM 01/20/2001 -0600, you wrote
I am about to place a request to the Lithuanian State Historical
Archives. I understand that the fee is $70 per surname per town.

Does anyone know if they will accept a check or if I need to get an
International Money Order >from the post office or some other system?

Also, can anyone give some indication of recent turnaround time?
Arnold Davidson
Boynton Beach, FL
arnoldbd@mindspring.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lithuanian State Historical Archives1 #general

Arnold Davidson <arnoldbd@...>
 

I have always sent a personal check, which they appear to have cashed with
no problem. As to turnaround time, I think it took about 9 months for them
to respond to my first request, which was about 4-5 years ago. More
recently, turnaround has been about 2 months or less but I don't know if
this is because of a difference in initial response versus follow-up
communications.

Arnold Davidson

At 12:00 AM 01/20/2001 -0600, you wrote
I am about to place a request to the Lithuanian State Historical
Archives. I understand that the fee is $70 per surname per town.

Does anyone know if they will accept a check or if I need to get an
International Money Order >from the post office or some other system?

Also, can anyone give some indication of recent turnaround time?
Arnold Davidson
Boynton Beach, FL
arnoldbd@mindspring.com


Re: Social Security Records #general

Jeff Kalish <JKALISH1@...>
 

Three months. I sent away for three SS-5's in September and received
them in December. I paid with one check ($21) and submitted one letter
with all three names. One SS-5 was handwritten by my greatuncle, but
the other two were computer printouts that were missing key information
(father's name, mother's maiden name, etc.). I was thrilled, but also
somewhat disappointed. Hope this helps.

Jeff Kalish
Wheaton, IL

Jeff Solotoroff wrote:

I wrote to the Social Security Admin. to obtain copies
of the SS-5 (application for social security card) for
several deceased family members. It's been almost two
months, and I haven't gotten any results.

Does anyone know about how long it takes to obtain
these records?


Re: Social Security Records #general

Howard Zakai
 

Jeff,
I sent out a request for an SS-5 applicationback around Thanksgiving
2000.. I just got it in the mail yesterday.. I don't know if 2 months is
the standard time or not. Good luck!
Howie Zakai
Binghamton, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Social Security Records #general

Jeff Kalish <JKALISH1@...>
 

Three months. I sent away for three SS-5's in September and received
them in December. I paid with one check ($21) and submitted one letter
with all three names. One SS-5 was handwritten by my greatuncle, but
the other two were computer printouts that were missing key information
(father's name, mother's maiden name, etc.). I was thrilled, but also
somewhat disappointed. Hope this helps.

Jeff Kalish
Wheaton, IL

Jeff Solotoroff wrote:

I wrote to the Social Security Admin. to obtain copies
of the SS-5 (application for social security card) for
several deceased family members. It's been almost two
months, and I haven't gotten any results.

Does anyone know about how long it takes to obtain
these records?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Social Security Records #general

Howard Zakai
 

Jeff,
I sent out a request for an SS-5 applicationback around Thanksgiving
2000.. I just got it in the mail yesterday.. I don't know if 2 months is
the standard time or not. Good luck!
Howie Zakai
Binghamton, NY


Family Surname Search #general

Naomi Strichartz <nrs@...>
 

I am searching for information about Frieda Dines, married name
Milikovsky in late 1800's around the Bialystock region or maybe Kosawo,
Poland. She immigrated to the United States in or about 1906 and lived
at Sterling Place in Brooklyn NY. Her daughter, Pearl Malikov Simon also
immigrated to Brooklyn. She married Noah Simon, presumed an orphan and
raided by villagers around Warsaw.

Also Moses Reicherson born in Vilna Lithuania and immigrated to NYC in
early 1900's who had 2 sons. I can' find his wife's name. One son, Isaac
was a cantor in Brooklyn NY and married Rebecca Smolinsky. Any
information would be appreciated

Naomi Strichartz
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Surname Search #general

Naomi Strichartz <nrs@...>
 

I am searching for information about Frieda Dines, married name
Milikovsky in late 1800's around the Bialystock region or maybe Kosawo,
Poland. She immigrated to the United States in or about 1906 and lived
at Sterling Place in Brooklyn NY. Her daughter, Pearl Malikov Simon also
immigrated to Brooklyn. She married Noah Simon, presumed an orphan and
raided by villagers around Warsaw.

Also Moses Reicherson born in Vilna Lithuania and immigrated to NYC in
early 1900's who had 2 sons. I can' find his wife's name. One son, Isaac
was a cantor in Brooklyn NY and married Rebecca Smolinsky. Any
information would be appreciated

Naomi Strichartz
New York


Yonasan Shapiro e-mail #general

Yoni Shapiro <torahgen@...>
 

Please send all emails to Yonasan Shapiro to
shapie@juno.com thnaxxxx


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yonasan Shapiro e-mail #general

Yoni Shapiro <torahgen@...>
 

Please send all emails to Yonasan Shapiro to
shapie@juno.com thnaxxxx


Convention of FEEFHS #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

International Convention 2001
5-7 October 20
Ramada Inn South Airport
6401 South 13th Street
Milwaukee,Wisconsin

An Invitation to Explore the Ancestral Past of Imperial

Austria-Hungary

Germany

Russia

Turkey
and the modern states of
Austria, Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Czech Republic,
Slovakia, Germany, Switzerland, Poland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania,
Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Russia, Yugoslavia, Macedonia, Bulgaria,
Romania, Armenia, Georgia

Manuscript, Digitized, and Filmed Sources
Germans >from Russia and Ukraine
American Immigrants
Research Techniques, Databases, Projects
Genealogical
Terminology, Archaic Scripts
Jewish
Research

FEEFHS members will receive a Registration Packet in April. At that
time, packets can also be requested >from the Program Chair at
mehrkb@ldschurch.org or by post:
Kahlile Mehr, 412 South, 400 West, Centerville, UT 84014

Conference details, as they become available, will be posted at:
http://feefhs.org/conf/01mil/01milhp.html or by return mail from:
FEEFHS, PO Box 510898, Salt Lake City, UT 84151-0898

FEEFHS welcomes members >from all countries * Promotes research into the
ancestral past of east and central Europe regardless of distinction by
ethnic, religious, or social group * Provides a forum for individuals and
organizations to exchange information and keep updated on developments in
the field * Sponsors an annual convention * Publishes a journal * Maintains
web site http://feefhs.org * Assists in developing databases * For
membership information see: http://feefhs.org/feefaq/member.html


Latvia SIG #Latvia Convention of FEEFHS #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

International Convention 2001
5-7 October 20
Ramada Inn South Airport
6401 South 13th Street
Milwaukee,Wisconsin

An Invitation to Explore the Ancestral Past of Imperial

Austria-Hungary

Germany

Russia

Turkey
and the modern states of
Austria, Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Czech Republic,
Slovakia, Germany, Switzerland, Poland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania,
Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Russia, Yugoslavia, Macedonia, Bulgaria,
Romania, Armenia, Georgia

Manuscript, Digitized, and Filmed Sources
Germans >from Russia and Ukraine
American Immigrants
Research Techniques, Databases, Projects
Genealogical
Terminology, Archaic Scripts
Jewish
Research

FEEFHS members will receive a Registration Packet in April. At that
time, packets can also be requested >from the Program Chair at
mehrkb@ldschurch.org or by post:
Kahlile Mehr, 412 South, 400 West, Centerville, UT 84014

Conference details, as they become available, will be posted at:
http://feefhs.org/conf/01mil/01milhp.html or by return mail from:
FEEFHS, PO Box 510898, Salt Lake City, UT 84151-0898

FEEFHS welcomes members >from all countries * Promotes research into the
ancestral past of east and central Europe regardless of distinction by
ethnic, religious, or social group * Provides a forum for individuals and
organizations to exchange information and keep updated on developments in
the field * Sponsors an annual convention * Publishes a journal * Maintains
web site http://feefhs.org * Assists in developing databases * For
membership information see: http://feefhs.org/feefaq/member.html


Re: Mutilation to Advoid Conscription #belarus

ruth holmstock <ruthholm@...>
 

I have just come back >from a meeting for beginners in Genealogy at
which one of the participants talked about their cousin being shot
in the leg to avoid conscription. The group leader told us that the
reason for avoiding it was because service was for 20 to 25 years
and most Jewish recruits never returned. According to him in some
shtetls a person was appointed the official maimer to help people
avoid conscription. He said this started with cutting off a single
finger but the Army got wise to that and it got more extreme.
The other 'dodge' was to change the surname of sons other than the
first born who was apparently exempt.

Nicholas Holmstock
Radlett, England
mailto:ruthholm@learnfree.co.uk

Searching for:
Borisov, Belarus: GOLOMSTOK, HOLOMSTOCK, GOLEMSTOK, GOLOMSHTOCK,
GOLOMSHTOK, GOLEMSTOCK, GOLMSHTOK, GOLMSTOCK
Vitepsk: GELKIN and LEAH, BRODNISKY
Poland:GOLDMAN


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mutilation to Advoid Conscription #belarus

ruth holmstock <ruthholm@...>
 

I have just come back >from a meeting for beginners in Genealogy at
which one of the participants talked about their cousin being shot
in the leg to avoid conscription. The group leader told us that the
reason for avoiding it was because service was for 20 to 25 years
and most Jewish recruits never returned. According to him in some
shtetls a person was appointed the official maimer to help people
avoid conscription. He said this started with cutting off a single
finger but the Army got wise to that and it got more extreme.
The other 'dodge' was to change the surname of sons other than the
first born who was apparently exempt.

Nicholas Holmstock
Radlett, England
mailto:ruthholm@learnfree.co.uk

Searching for:
Borisov, Belarus: GOLOMSTOK, HOLOMSTOCK, GOLEMSTOK, GOLOMSHTOCK,
GOLOMSHTOK, GOLEMSTOCK, GOLMSHTOK, GOLMSTOCK
Vitepsk: GELKIN and LEAH, BRODNISKY
Poland:GOLDMAN


Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

Jerry (Gerald B.) Bernstein <jbernste@...>
 

You know, I've watched e-mails on this subject fly by without having
the time to pay too much attention. But today this caught my eye
because of a possible ANOMOLY in my family as follows:

My (maternal) grandfather emigrated >from Europe to America (NY) about
1907 and Settled in Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. I have his Russian
(Czarist) internal passport, his U.S. immigration records, and various
other "hard" evidence that he arrived in NY (with his wife, parents,
uncles and aunts, etc.) at about age 21. The curious thing is that his
Passport indicates THAT HE WAS A VETERAN. I'd assume this meant the
same Czarist armies that were conscripting other Jewish men. We're
aware of the general imact on the Jewish people of such conscription.
So - is it possible - for my grandfather to be a "veteran" of the Czar's
army by age 21?

My grandfather's passport was issued in Slonim and indicated his
citizenship (birthplace?) to be Molchad, both in the vicinity of Minsk.
Additionally, my grandfather's synnagogue in Brooklyn (of which he was
a founder, and where I was Bar Mizvah'd was the Chevra Torah Anshei
Raditzkowitz. This points to another family connection in the Minsk
area.

At the time of his emigration the family was living in Kishinev.
There is hard evidence of this too. Other documentation includes
a "certified" letter >from the carpenter's labor union asking other
union members in other cities to assist my grandfather in getting
work.

Now for me, this Jewish Genealogy is - at least in part - uncovering
the UNDERLYING HUMAN STORY of these people who left the old country
to come to America.

My interpretation is that the family had earlier connections in the
Minsk/Radoshkovitz/Molchad/Slonim/Grodna area, but moved south to
Kishinev. I believe this move to Kishinev was part of a family plan
with the explicit aim of emigrating.

So the entire clan - My great grandfather Jacob and his wife and 10
children - one of which was my grandfather and grandmother (she to
have 8 children in America and apparently having lost one after
Kishinev sometime. Jacob and his extended family take their leave
of Meyer (my great-great grandfather) and his wife and Hirsh & Dobra
Kaminsky - the in-law parents - and embark for America.

Family oral history has it that they snuck over the border overnight
and ran away through a forest. They made their way to New York via
Rotterdam on a ship called the Nordham.

This story toughes me - that's why I bother with this - but am I
correctly interpreting the shreads of evidence I have, or am I
romanticizing because it's fun.

Does this interpretation hold water?

Jerry Bernstein

-----------------------
Irene Newhouse wrote:

Having for years read various stories of illegally leaving Russia to
avoid army service and all the other stories of mutilation such as
those recently under discussion, it always made me wonder why there
were no similar stories in my family. Note that I'm a first
generation American, so lost in the mists of time is not a good answer.
....snip...
-----------------------


Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

Betsy Brazy <bbrazy@...>
 

I'm a little disturbed by the quickness to clobber each other publicly over
inaccuracies or perceived slights. I read Naomi Fatouros' message merely as
research pointing to another scholar's different view. Let us remember that
we are all related and therefore try to be a little more gracious with each
other.

Betsy BRAZY
Research: SIPERSTEIN of Pinsk, Belarus; DRAIKIN of Kherson, Ukraine; BRAZY
of Tukums, Latvia; HURWICH of Kaunas, Lithuania


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

Jerry (Gerald B.) Bernstein <jbernste@...>
 

You know, I've watched e-mails on this subject fly by without having
the time to pay too much attention. But today this caught my eye
because of a possible ANOMOLY in my family as follows:

My (maternal) grandfather emigrated >from Europe to America (NY) about
1907 and Settled in Brownsville, Brooklyn, NY. I have his Russian
(Czarist) internal passport, his U.S. immigration records, and various
other "hard" evidence that he arrived in NY (with his wife, parents,
uncles and aunts, etc.) at about age 21. The curious thing is that his
Passport indicates THAT HE WAS A VETERAN. I'd assume this meant the
same Czarist armies that were conscripting other Jewish men. We're
aware of the general imact on the Jewish people of such conscription.
So - is it possible - for my grandfather to be a "veteran" of the Czar's
army by age 21?

My grandfather's passport was issued in Slonim and indicated his
citizenship (birthplace?) to be Molchad, both in the vicinity of Minsk.
Additionally, my grandfather's synnagogue in Brooklyn (of which he was
a founder, and where I was Bar Mizvah'd was the Chevra Torah Anshei
Raditzkowitz. This points to another family connection in the Minsk
area.

At the time of his emigration the family was living in Kishinev.
There is hard evidence of this too. Other documentation includes
a "certified" letter >from the carpenter's labor union asking other
union members in other cities to assist my grandfather in getting
work.

Now for me, this Jewish Genealogy is - at least in part - uncovering
the UNDERLYING HUMAN STORY of these people who left the old country
to come to America.

My interpretation is that the family had earlier connections in the
Minsk/Radoshkovitz/Molchad/Slonim/Grodna area, but moved south to
Kishinev. I believe this move to Kishinev was part of a family plan
with the explicit aim of emigrating.

So the entire clan - My great grandfather Jacob and his wife and 10
children - one of which was my grandfather and grandmother (she to
have 8 children in America and apparently having lost one after
Kishinev sometime. Jacob and his extended family take their leave
of Meyer (my great-great grandfather) and his wife and Hirsh & Dobra
Kaminsky - the in-law parents - and embark for America.

Family oral history has it that they snuck over the border overnight
and ran away through a forest. They made their way to New York via
Rotterdam on a ship called the Nordham.

This story toughes me - that's why I bother with this - but am I
correctly interpreting the shreads of evidence I have, or am I
romanticizing because it's fun.

Does this interpretation hold water?

Jerry Bernstein

-----------------------
Irene Newhouse wrote:

Having for years read various stories of illegally leaving Russia to
avoid army service and all the other stories of mutilation such as
those recently under discussion, it always made me wonder why there
were no similar stories in my family. Note that I'm a first
generation American, so lost in the mists of time is not a good answer.
....snip...
-----------------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

Betsy Brazy <bbrazy@...>
 

I'm a little disturbed by the quickness to clobber each other publicly over
inaccuracies or perceived slights. I read Naomi Fatouros' message merely as
research pointing to another scholar's different view. Let us remember that
we are all related and therefore try to be a little more gracious with each
other.

Betsy BRAZY
Research: SIPERSTEIN of Pinsk, Belarus; DRAIKIN of Kherson, Ukraine; BRAZY
of Tukums, Latvia; HURWICH of Kaunas, Lithuania