Date   

Wood Dealers in Ulanow, Poland #general

dorothy rivers <dotvic@...>
 

I have an 1891 Business Directory with three wood dealers listed. I would
like to know if there is a way of learning the names of men employed by
these companies. My great-grandfather was a forester and was killed on the
job in 1894.

His name was Simon BERGSTEIN and he left a widow and seven children.
Any help I can get would be most appreciated.

Dorothy Auerbach Rivers
Silver City NM


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wood Dealers in Ulanow, Poland #general

dorothy rivers <dotvic@...>
 

I have an 1891 Business Directory with three wood dealers listed. I would
like to know if there is a way of learning the names of men employed by
these companies. My great-grandfather was a forester and was killed on the
job in 1894.

His name was Simon BERGSTEIN and he left a widow and seven children.
Any help I can get would be most appreciated.

Dorothy Auerbach Rivers
Silver City NM


Re: Surname PRINCE from Jaroslaw #general

Paul Silverstone
 

Herzog is German for Duke. The corresponding words for Prince are
Prinz or Furst in German, Knjaz in Russian.
Paul Silverstone

Tomek Liniecki wrote:

In researching mymaternal lineI have been examining theLDS records from
Jaroslaw for the surname Prince.Although the records are in Cyrillic,it
is clear that nothing resembling"Prince"can be found.Would Prince be an
Anglicized version of a Polish Name? Any help would be appreciated.
I suggest to search for Herzog. In Russian it shall start with letter G.

Regards,

Tomasz Linetzky
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname PRINCE from Jaroslaw #general

Paul Silverstone
 

Herzog is German for Duke. The corresponding words for Prince are
Prinz or Furst in German, Knjaz in Russian.
Paul Silverstone

Tomek Liniecki wrote:

In researching mymaternal lineI have been examining theLDS records from
Jaroslaw for the surname Prince.Although the records are in Cyrillic,it
is clear that nothing resembling"Prince"can be found.Would Prince be an
Anglicized version of a Polish Name? Any help would be appreciated.
I suggest to search for Herzog. In Russian it shall start with letter G.

Regards,

Tomasz Linetzky
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


Proposed Skalat memorial #galicia

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Please have a look at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Suchostav/Skalat/Memorial.htm

This is the proposed memorial to be built at the edge of the Skalat
football field (formerly the Jewish cemetery). The memorial is to be
constructed of gravestones currently being used for paving around city
hall.

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Proposed Skalat memorial #galicia

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Please have a look at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Suchostav/Skalat/Memorial.htm

This is the proposed memorial to be built at the edge of the Skalat
football field (formerly the Jewish cemetery). The memorial is to be
constructed of gravestones currently being used for paving around city
hall.

Israel Pickholtz


Haifa help #general

NEIL185@...
 

Looking for help re the Haifa Music and Ethnology Museum regarding an item
they have - inventory #1274.

Any help is very much appreciated, thanks, Neil Rosenstein.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Haifa help #general

NEIL185@...
 

Looking for help re the Haifa Music and Ethnology Museum regarding an item
they have - inventory #1274.

Any help is very much appreciated, thanks, Neil Rosenstein.


maiden name and reasons behind surname changes? #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank all
who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen and I
felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge and
experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners
for different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the unfairly
blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage
of more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities
and children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian
metrical records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to
marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they
were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate
+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in
the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal
surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment
after deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple
with no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the
19th century as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion, but
for political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the
father-in-law's family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name
on arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did not
skip any!

Carlos Glikson - Buenos Aires, Argentina - eMail cglikson@iname.com.
Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin)
ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), KARP (Grodno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?),
KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen maiden name and reasons behind surname changes? #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank all
who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen and I
felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge and
experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners
for different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the unfairly
blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage
of more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities
and children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian
metrical records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to
marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they
were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate
+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in
the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal
surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment
after deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple
with no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the
19th century as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion, but
for political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the
father-in-law's family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name
on arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did not
skip any!

Carlos Glikson - Buenos Aires, Argentina - eMail cglikson@iname.com.
Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin)
ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), KARP (Grodno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?),
KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


PIKE #general

Michael J. Bohnen <bohnen@...>
 

Looking for information about (or relatives of) Jacob PIKE, born in
Brooklyn, circa 1850, played pro baseball for Hartford in 1877. His
brother was Lipman Pike, 1845-1893, also a professional professional
ball-player.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PIKE #general

Michael J. Bohnen <bohnen@...>
 

Looking for information about (or relatives of) Jacob PIKE, born in
Brooklyn, circa 1850, played pro baseball for Hartford in 1877. His
brother was Lipman Pike, 1845-1893, also a professional professional
ball-player.


Re: Russian/Ucrainian words? #general

Joe Armata <armata+@...>
 

My guess is "vidomostia" is a misreading of "vedomost'" with some case
ending, maybe the plural (vedomosti), as -ia is an incorrect ending for
nouns in "-ost'". Handwritten Cyrillic can be very hard to read, and the
first vowel might actually have been a letter called jat' in the old
orthography (today it's replaced by an e), which can look like an i if
it's written fast. Vedomost' means a register or a list, which seems to
fit the context. In the plural it can also mean a newspaper.

Hope this helps!

Joe Armata
armata@pitt.edu

For exemple:
1. Vidomostia Jidovilor.
"Jidovilor" = of the Jews
But what is "Vidomostia"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian/Ucrainian words? #general

Joe Armata <armata+@...>
 

My guess is "vidomostia" is a misreading of "vedomost'" with some case
ending, maybe the plural (vedomosti), as -ia is an incorrect ending for
nouns in "-ost'". Handwritten Cyrillic can be very hard to read, and the
first vowel might actually have been a letter called jat' in the old
orthography (today it's replaced by an e), which can look like an i if
it's written fast. Vedomost' means a register or a list, which seems to
fit the context. In the plural it can also mean a newspaper.

Hope this helps!

Joe Armata
armata@pitt.edu

For exemple:
1. Vidomostia Jidovilor.
"Jidovilor" = of the Jews
But what is "Vidomostia"


Re: Child Traveling Alone #general

Mimi Katz <geveretk@...>
 

I found a 10 yr. old relative who traveled alone in the 1880's! Times were
different.

Mimi Katz, Chicago

I have just received the List or Manifest of Alien Passengers
containing my great-uncle's name. It indicates he was age 11 at the time
and that his passage was paid for by his older brother (who would have
been about 14 years his senior).

Looking at the rest of the names on the list, none of which I
recognize, it appears the boy was traveling alone.

How likely would that have been (in 1909)?

Stacy Harris


Polish Translation Wanted: Viewmate #general

Joel Weintraub <JWeintraub@...>
 

I need help in translating what is probably Polish on the back of
four picture postcards. They are on Viewmate
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
in the "To View" section - as files - VM149/150/151/152.
The postcards probably concern Regina Anuszewicz who was born
in Warsaw, Poland in 1890, and her parents Joseph and Lena.
Regina lived in Berlin for a while before 1915 and one of the cards
appears to have a German stamp.

Two of the four postcards were mailed. The first postcard also has
writing on the photo side which I saw after I posted the jpgs to
Viewmate. If you can read the writing on the first card, I would
appreciate the opportunity of mailing you the other side of the card
as well (or eventually post it on Viewmate). If seeing the actual
photos would help in the translation, please send me an email and
I'll send you those jpgs.

Thanks in advance,

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
JWeintraub@Fullerton.edu

Researching: Ukraine: Weintraub, Scher, Spatz, Treister, Horowitz,
Parmit, Barmab, Rosenberg, Rotenberg, Wiseman, Gellman,
Treister, Spieler, Grad, Sesalt, Voteen, Kaskel, Kritchman,
Moscowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Child Traveling Alone #general

Mimi Katz <geveretk@...>
 

I found a 10 yr. old relative who traveled alone in the 1880's! Times were
different.

Mimi Katz, Chicago

I have just received the List or Manifest of Alien Passengers
containing my great-uncle's name. It indicates he was age 11 at the time
and that his passage was paid for by his older brother (who would have
been about 14 years his senior).

Looking at the rest of the names on the list, none of which I
recognize, it appears the boy was traveling alone.

How likely would that have been (in 1909)?

Stacy Harris


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Translation Wanted: Viewmate #general

Joel Weintraub <JWeintraub@...>
 

I need help in translating what is probably Polish on the back of
four picture postcards. They are on Viewmate
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
in the "To View" section - as files - VM149/150/151/152.
The postcards probably concern Regina Anuszewicz who was born
in Warsaw, Poland in 1890, and her parents Joseph and Lena.
Regina lived in Berlin for a while before 1915 and one of the cards
appears to have a German stamp.

Two of the four postcards were mailed. The first postcard also has
writing on the photo side which I saw after I posted the jpgs to
Viewmate. If you can read the writing on the first card, I would
appreciate the opportunity of mailing you the other side of the card
as well (or eventually post it on Viewmate). If seeing the actual
photos would help in the translation, please send me an email and
I'll send you those jpgs.

Thanks in advance,

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
JWeintraub@Fullerton.edu

Researching: Ukraine: Weintraub, Scher, Spatz, Treister, Horowitz,
Parmit, Barmab, Rosenberg, Rotenberg, Wiseman, Gellman,
Treister, Spieler, Grad, Sesalt, Voteen, Kaskel, Kritchman,
Moscowitz


russian translation-Viewmate #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Dear Genners
I have a document in Russian on ViewMate that I would be grateful if
someone would translate. http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ VM145
It is a document I had to scan in 4 parts because of it size.
All it is however are names, places and dates of birth.
The names crossed out are also of importance to me, since they are the
names of my g-parents and their spelling was different >from mine. ( I just
found out) If you can fill in the printed text I would appreciate it very
much. Of equal importance is column 9 & 10 in circles.
Thank you in advance
Lili Susser
Susserl@home.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen russian translation-Viewmate #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Dear Genners
I have a document in Russian on ViewMate that I would be grateful if
someone would translate. http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ VM145
It is a document I had to scan in 4 parts because of it size.
All it is however are names, places and dates of birth.
The names crossed out are also of importance to me, since they are the
names of my g-parents and their spelling was different >from mine. ( I just
found out) If you can fill in the printed text I would appreciate it very
much. Of equal importance is column 9 & 10 in circles.
Thank you in advance
Lili Susser
Susserl@home.com