Date   

Re: belarus digest: December 26, 2000 #belarus

Bill Schechter <bschech@...>
 

Could someone please provide, once again, the web address of this Green
Castle site.

Thank you!

Bill Schechter


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: belarus digest: December 26, 2000 #belarus

Bill Schechter <bschech@...>
 

Could someone please provide, once again, the web address of this Green
Castle site.

Thank you!

Bill Schechter


re Names #belarus

Betsy Brazy <bbrazy@...>
 

Hirsh is Yiddish for the Hebrew Zvi.
In the US this name was "translated" into Harry.
---------------
It depends on when they immigrated, and how savvy they were about
choosing a common rather than old-fashioned or ethnic name.
My grandfather Hirsh DRAIKIN, who immigrated to the US just before
World War I, at first chose "Hyman," then changed to "Herman"
sometime before receiving his final citizenship papers, probably to
assimilate during this anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic period in the US.
His Russian name was "Grisha" -- I believe it's been said that there's
no "H" in Russian and a hard G sound frequently is substituted.

Betsy BRAZY (bbrazy@...)
in Belarus, researching SIPERSTEIN of Pinsk



---------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
OK - one more <VBG>
but then: I think this thread should be closed now --
Please send any future replies privately to the sender
---------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus re Names #belarus

Betsy Brazy <bbrazy@...>
 

Hirsh is Yiddish for the Hebrew Zvi.
In the US this name was "translated" into Harry.
---------------
It depends on when they immigrated, and how savvy they were about
choosing a common rather than old-fashioned or ethnic name.
My grandfather Hirsh DRAIKIN, who immigrated to the US just before
World War I, at first chose "Hyman," then changed to "Herman"
sometime before receiving his final citizenship papers, probably to
assimilate during this anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic period in the US.
His Russian name was "Grisha" -- I believe it's been said that there's
no "H" in Russian and a hard G sound frequently is substituted.

Betsy BRAZY (bbrazy@...)
in Belarus, researching SIPERSTEIN of Pinsk



---------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
OK - one more <VBG>
but then: I think this thread should be closed now --
Please send any future replies privately to the sender
---------------


Dudin/Dugino/Dudino #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

Hello all,

At first, the family story had it that the SHANINs came >from the town
Monastirshchina in Mogilev gubernia (now in Russia).

My mother then did some research, and found that the name of the town
was Dujin (as *pronounced* by an aged relative).

Further research on my part uncovered that Monastirshchina and Dudin
(as *spelled* by a relative who lived there) are now one and the same.
Perhaps at one time they were two very small shtetls very close to each
other and are now one city.

I was just checking out the Religious Personnel database and found a
town listing for:

"Poselenii Dugino (Dudino?)" in Mogilev.

This is a nice little tidbit to tie together my bits of information--
I think that *perhaps* this "Dugino" (Dujin??) is my Dudin and not
Dudino which is another town in Mogilev.

Anyway, I thought it was interesting to find this correlation and
thought I'd pass it along...

Elaine Bush
Carmel, CA

Researching:
SHANIN/SHEININ/SHAININ Monastirshchina/Dudin, Mstislavl uzed, Mogilev
FRUMHOFF/FRUMOV Minsk gubernia
REST Libau, Latvia


Belarus SIG #Belarus Dudin/Dugino/Dudino #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

Hello all,

At first, the family story had it that the SHANINs came >from the town
Monastirshchina in Mogilev gubernia (now in Russia).

My mother then did some research, and found that the name of the town
was Dujin (as *pronounced* by an aged relative).

Further research on my part uncovered that Monastirshchina and Dudin
(as *spelled* by a relative who lived there) are now one and the same.
Perhaps at one time they were two very small shtetls very close to each
other and are now one city.

I was just checking out the Religious Personnel database and found a
town listing for:

"Poselenii Dugino (Dudino?)" in Mogilev.

This is a nice little tidbit to tie together my bits of information--
I think that *perhaps* this "Dugino" (Dujin??) is my Dudin and not
Dudino which is another town in Mogilev.

Anyway, I thought it was interesting to find this correlation and
thought I'd pass it along...

Elaine Bush
Carmel, CA

Researching:
SHANIN/SHEININ/SHAININ Monastirshchina/Dudin, Mstislavl uzed, Mogilev
FRUMHOFF/FRUMOV Minsk gubernia
REST Libau, Latvia


Re: Family Origin-Minsk Gubernia:View Mate Posting # 177 #belarus

David Garth <ynep@...>
 

-------------------------
Ofer Cohen wrote:

... snip....
One of its diminutives is Shabtl, >from which the Yidish form Shepsl was
derived. In the Ashkenazic accent the "tav" is pronunced as "thav" (like
the "th" in the word "athlet"). >from here to pronunce it as "s" the road
is quite short. This transformation is a key to many uses of the
consonant "s" in the "Yiddishized" Hebrew names.
... snip...
--------------------------
I've never heard of an ashkenazi pronunciation of the letter tav
(the final letter of the Hebrew) as a "th" sound. Maybe I'm ignorant
of some etymological development of Hebrew, but I believe the facts
are as follows.

As far as I'm aware, and as I was taught in cheder, there are two
versions of this letter in ashkenazi Hebrew - tof and sof. You can
tell the difference between the two when vowels are present in the
written Hebrew - tof has a dot in the center and sof does not.
(I'm sure there's a name for the dot, but I don't know what it is).

Perhaps you're getting this >from the fact that some Jewish organizations
and congregations in the US use the English letters "th" to signify the
letter tof or sof (for example B'nai B'rith) - but it's only an English
corruption that actually leads people to pronounce these letters like
the "th" in "athlete."

David Garth
SHIMSHELEVICH (Lubsch)
FEINGOLD/FINEGOLD (Lubsch, NY/London)
YEDLETSKY (Lodz, Leeds)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Family Origin-Minsk Gubernia:View Mate Posting # 177 #belarus

David Garth <ynep@...>
 

-------------------------
Ofer Cohen wrote:

... snip....
One of its diminutives is Shabtl, >from which the Yidish form Shepsl was
derived. In the Ashkenazic accent the "tav" is pronunced as "thav" (like
the "th" in the word "athlet"). >from here to pronunce it as "s" the road
is quite short. This transformation is a key to many uses of the
consonant "s" in the "Yiddishized" Hebrew names.
... snip...
--------------------------
I've never heard of an ashkenazi pronunciation of the letter tav
(the final letter of the Hebrew) as a "th" sound. Maybe I'm ignorant
of some etymological development of Hebrew, but I believe the facts
are as follows.

As far as I'm aware, and as I was taught in cheder, there are two
versions of this letter in ashkenazi Hebrew - tof and sof. You can
tell the difference between the two when vowels are present in the
written Hebrew - tof has a dot in the center and sof does not.
(I'm sure there's a name for the dot, but I don't know what it is).

Perhaps you're getting this >from the fact that some Jewish organizations
and congregations in the US use the English letters "th" to signify the
letter tof or sof (for example B'nai B'rith) - but it's only an English
corruption that actually leads people to pronounce these letters like
the "th" in "athlete."

David Garth
SHIMSHELEVICH (Lubsch)
FEINGOLD/FINEGOLD (Lubsch, NY/London)
YEDLETSKY (Lodz, Leeds)


Re: Mentioning the father's name on a grave #belarus

Len Farber <lhfarber@...>
 

One other reason may be money. I believe that headstones inscriptions are paid for by the
letter. The more you inscribe, the more it costs.

Len Farber
Oak Park, Illinois

Ofer wrote:

I am wondering: do you not think it unusual that there is no
mention in the encription on the grave of the deceased's
father's name? Is it possible the
children didn't know it, or is there another explanation?
This is an interesting question: I don't think there is a common rule of the
text that should be placed on the grave. I saw a very detailed text, with
long phrases to the deceased, naming only his name. On another, I saw a
grave where the name of the deceased parents and shtetl of origin were
written. It seems to me that the text is subject more to the encriptor's
ability. Are there other opinions?

OferCohen
Israel

---
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Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mentioning the father's name on a grave #belarus

Len Farber <lhfarber@...>
 

One other reason may be money. I believe that headstones inscriptions are paid for by the
letter. The more you inscribe, the more it costs.

Len Farber
Oak Park, Illinois

Ofer wrote:

I am wondering: do you not think it unusual that there is no
mention in the encription on the grave of the deceased's
father's name? Is it possible the
children didn't know it, or is there another explanation?
This is an interesting question: I don't think there is a common rule of the
text that should be placed on the grave. I saw a very detailed text, with
long phrases to the deceased, naming only his name. On another, I saw a
grave where the name of the deceased parents and shtetl of origin were
written. It seems to me that the text is subject more to the encriptor's
ability. Are there other opinions?

OferCohen
Israel

---
To post to the Belarus SIG discussion group, send your message to:
<belarus@...>

Belarus SIG Webpage: <http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus>
Belarus Online Newsletter: <http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>

Join the Research Trip to Belarus <http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/minsk.html>

This SIG (belarus@...) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to belarus as: [lhfarber@...]
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


Family Tree Maker #general

Moses Lenzky <mlenzky@...>
 

Q.
Does anyone know if it's possible to enter information
into Family tree maker release 7.0 in Hebrew and to
beable to print it as well?

Please answer privatly

Moshe Lenzky

mlenzky@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Tree Maker #general

Moses Lenzky <mlenzky@...>
 

Q.
Does anyone know if it's possible to enter information
into Family tree maker release 7.0 in Hebrew and to
beable to print it as well?

Please answer privatly

Moshe Lenzky

mlenzky@...


Goseph GEGERMAN's relatives and friends where? #general

sergei komarov <komarov_sergei@...>
 

Dear Jewishgens!

My name is Sergei Malichin. I look for relatives or friends of Goseph
GEGERMAN (Iosiph GELLERMAN).

I.G. he is my father. He was born in Riga in 1919,after the WW2 lived
Russia, but last 15 years ( >from 1973 to his death 1989)had lived in New York(Flushing).

I know the only one of his friend - Anatoliy Binshtok (he lives New York),
but I lost his address.

In the testament written 1975, Goseph tells about his brother - Nohum
Gellerman, living Natania(Israel)that time.

Gosiph Gegerman(Iosiph Gellerman)Riga-Moscow-Israel-ChiÓago-New York
Anatoliy Binshtok: Moskow-New York
Nochum Gellerman (Riga-Israel)

Thank you.

Sergei Malichin.
komarov_sergei@... I live in Moscow.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Goseph GEGERMAN's relatives and friends where? #general

sergei komarov <komarov_sergei@...>
 

Dear Jewishgens!

My name is Sergei Malichin. I look for relatives or friends of Goseph
GEGERMAN (Iosiph GELLERMAN).

I.G. he is my father. He was born in Riga in 1919,after the WW2 lived
Russia, but last 15 years ( >from 1973 to his death 1989)had lived in New York(Flushing).

I know the only one of his friend - Anatoliy Binshtok (he lives New York),
but I lost his address.

In the testament written 1975, Goseph tells about his brother - Nohum
Gellerman, living Natania(Israel)that time.

Gosiph Gegerman(Iosiph Gellerman)Riga-Moscow-Israel-ChiÓago-New York
Anatoliy Binshtok: Moskow-New York
Nochum Gellerman (Riga-Israel)

Thank you.

Sergei Malichin.
komarov_sergei@... I live in Moscow.


Re: Petra - from the Greek Petros? meaning stone #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Wed, 27 Dec 2000 17:24:01, nachum@... (Nachum) opined:

I just got back >from reserve duty, and wanted to add a comment about the
name Petra, even though it's already old news.

In the Yerushalmi, Tractate Shvi'it, there is an Aramaic word, that is
derived >from the Greek. If my memory is correct, the Greek word is
Petros, and means stone. Petra is probably named for the Greek word,
only indicating the stone.
That Petra stone is red, is another matter. Edom (another name for Esau)
means red in Hebrew. Esau got this name due to his Reddish complexion.
..and that, of course, is why Petra is called in Hebrew "haSela'
haAdom" -- The Red Rock.

By the way, for our Cape Town friends, there's an Aramaic word in the
Gemmara, Kipis or Kipos, which also means stone. When I first saw this
word I thought of Cape Town, and Table Mountain. Perhaps the English
word Cape derives >from this Aramaic word, and the Cape Town forefathers
may have known of it's original meaning.
Hardly. "Cape", as a geological formation, is related to Germanic e.g.
"Kopf" (Head). A cape is a "headland", isn't it?

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will NOT reach me, but will be deleted automatically unread.
Replace "sheol" with "stan". Please send plain text only.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Petra - from the Greek Petros? meaning stone #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Wed, 27 Dec 2000 17:24:01, nachum@... (Nachum) opined:

I just got back >from reserve duty, and wanted to add a comment about the
name Petra, even though it's already old news.

In the Yerushalmi, Tractate Shvi'it, there is an Aramaic word, that is
derived >from the Greek. If my memory is correct, the Greek word is
Petros, and means stone. Petra is probably named for the Greek word,
only indicating the stone.
That Petra stone is red, is another matter. Edom (another name for Esau)
means red in Hebrew. Esau got this name due to his Reddish complexion.
..and that, of course, is why Petra is called in Hebrew "haSela'
haAdom" -- The Red Rock.

By the way, for our Cape Town friends, there's an Aramaic word in the
Gemmara, Kipis or Kipos, which also means stone. When I first saw this
word I thought of Cape Town, and Table Mountain. Perhaps the English
word Cape derives >from this Aramaic word, and the Cape Town forefathers
may have known of it's original meaning.
Hardly. "Cape", as a geological formation, is related to Germanic e.g.
"Kopf" (Head). A cape is a "headland", isn't it?

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will NOT reach me, but will be deleted automatically unread.
Replace "sheol" with "stan". Please send plain text only.


Women and the Holocaust #general

Myron Chijner <mchijner@...>
 

Dear Genners,
This is a new site which many should find interesting:

Women and the Holocaust - http://www.interlog.com/~mighty/
A series of articles, essays, book reviews, and interviews.
The table of contents makes it easy to browse the site, or you
can use the Bibliography for a breakdown of how the site is
organized. Subjects range >from Personal Reflections to
Women Rescuers and reflect the unique and terrifying elements
that women faced during this terrible time. Edited by
Judy Weissenberg Cohen, a Holocaust witness and survivor.

Regards,
Myron Chijner
mchijner@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Women and the Holocaust #general

Myron Chijner <mchijner@...>
 

Dear Genners,
This is a new site which many should find interesting:

Women and the Holocaust - http://www.interlog.com/~mighty/
A series of articles, essays, book reviews, and interviews.
The table of contents makes it easy to browse the site, or you
can use the Bibliography for a breakdown of how the site is
organized. Subjects range >from Personal Reflections to
Women Rescuers and reflect the unique and terrifying elements
that women faced during this terrible time. Edited by
Judy Weissenberg Cohen, a Holocaust witness and survivor.

Regards,
Myron Chijner
mchijner@...


Hebrew U ketubbot #general

M. Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

The Hebrew university has uploaded it's 1200 ketubbot. They can be
observed read and searched by name or country:
http://jnul.huji.ac.il/dl/ketubbot/

This is not a genealogy site but a "Jewish art" or Tradition one.

So some of the Ketubbot are not filled with names.
The names that are filled are mostly in Hebrew.

All the best

Merav Schejtman
Jerusalem Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew U ketubbot #general

M. Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

The Hebrew university has uploaded it's 1200 ketubbot. They can be
observed read and searched by name or country:
http://jnul.huji.ac.il/dl/ketubbot/

This is not a genealogy site but a "Jewish art" or Tradition one.

So some of the Ketubbot are not filled with names.
The names that are filled are mostly in Hebrew.

All the best

Merav Schejtman
Jerusalem Israel