Date   

Re: 1828 tax census #hungary

David and BethLong <dnblong@...>
 

On the 1828 census, only the names of heads of households are listed. Most
likely, this is the father of your g-g-grandfather, who had the same first
name.

Beth Long
dnblong@...

-----Original Message-----
From: The2thdkdr@... [SMTP:The2thdkdr@...]
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 4:29 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: 1828 tax census

I believe I found my great, great grandfather on the 1828 Zemplen tax
census. If it was him he would have been 13 years old at the time.
Would a thirteen year old boy be put on such a list? <snip>


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: 1828 tax census #hungary

David and BethLong <dnblong@...>
 

On the 1828 census, only the names of heads of households are listed. Most
likely, this is the father of your g-g-grandfather, who had the same first
name.

Beth Long
dnblong@...

-----Original Message-----
From: The2thdkdr@... [SMTP:The2thdkdr@...]
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 4:29 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: 1828 tax census

I believe I found my great, great grandfather on the 1828 Zemplen tax
census. If it was him he would have been 13 years old at the time.
Would a thirteen year old boy be put on such a list? <snip>


Re: wisdom on name transliterations? #hungary

Bob and Hazel Keimowitz <rkhk@...>
 

I am not expert but am also working on an H-Sig database. I also noted the
recent announcement about the Yizkor project's database. The point of the
latter was it was searchable using the Soundex technology which finds
phonetically similar names, even though spelled very differently. My
position has been to transcribe as accurately as possible; let the Soundex
technology identify similar sounding names. My last name could have been
spelled Haimowitz, Chaimovitz, Keimovits, etc. My father insisted his
family always used the K. (I think that may have been the case in the last
couple of generations; I doubt it goes back much further since many (at
least those who has already chosen a "last name") would probably have
spelled their name with Hebrew characters.) Nonetheless, being able to find
Kei... would make me think I was closer to "family" than the Soundex names.



Bob Keimowitz
3731 Chesapeake Street, NW
Washington, DC 20016-1813
202-362-6053
202-537-4890 (fax)
email: rkhk@...; when travelling we can sometimes be reached at
bob_haz@...

-----Original Message-----
From: John Rothchild [mailto:jroth@...]
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 7:46 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: wisdom on name transliterations?


I have been entering general data into a spreadsheet for a particular
Hungarian county for posting on H-SIG, and am wondering whether the group
has any wisdom on the most appropriate method to deal with last name
spelling issues. I have been transcribing exactly what I am finding in the
original documents, but others have suggested that perhaps I should be
using a consistent spelling; e.g., Veiss and Weisz are the same, Schwimmer
and Svimmer are the same, Bleyer and Bleier are the same, and perhaps we
should be spelling them the same way in our postings even though the text
contains different spellings. <snip>


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: wisdom on name transliterations? #hungary

Bob and Hazel Keimowitz <rkhk@...>
 

I am not expert but am also working on an H-Sig database. I also noted the
recent announcement about the Yizkor project's database. The point of the
latter was it was searchable using the Soundex technology which finds
phonetically similar names, even though spelled very differently. My
position has been to transcribe as accurately as possible; let the Soundex
technology identify similar sounding names. My last name could have been
spelled Haimowitz, Chaimovitz, Keimovits, etc. My father insisted his
family always used the K. (I think that may have been the case in the last
couple of generations; I doubt it goes back much further since many (at
least those who has already chosen a "last name") would probably have
spelled their name with Hebrew characters.) Nonetheless, being able to find
Kei... would make me think I was closer to "family" than the Soundex names.



Bob Keimowitz
3731 Chesapeake Street, NW
Washington, DC 20016-1813
202-362-6053
202-537-4890 (fax)
email: rkhk@...; when travelling we can sometimes be reached at
bob_haz@...

-----Original Message-----
From: John Rothchild [mailto:jroth@...]
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 7:46 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: wisdom on name transliterations?


I have been entering general data into a spreadsheet for a particular
Hungarian county for posting on H-SIG, and am wondering whether the group
has any wisdom on the most appropriate method to deal with last name
spelling issues. I have been transcribing exactly what I am finding in the
original documents, but others have suggested that perhaps I should be
using a consistent spelling; e.g., Veiss and Weisz are the same, Schwimmer
and Svimmer are the same, Bleyer and Bleier are the same, and perhaps we
should be spelling them the same way in our postings even though the text
contains different spellings. <snip>


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Fwd: Message from Susan King #yizkorbooks

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

From: Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
Subject: JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey--A Look Forward into the New
Milennium!--Second Edition <grin>

The numbers are in . . . and by the looks of it, the year 2000 has been
another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no exception.


*Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million
searches performed in 2000
*Over 1457 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
*Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and
Research Group mailing lists in the year 2000
*Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with
an additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million
records all powered by JewishGen's servers
*255 Yizkor Book Translations Online up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
*422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truly, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse
people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the
thousands-- come together with a common mission and purpose,
participating and sharing in what we believe is one of the
largest grass roots efforts ever undertaken to preserve our
history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million
records awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries
throughout the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic, All Holocaust) which is going to take an
effort far beyond the capabilities of our current database team's
volunteer time. This means the pressing need for both full time
professional technical staff and volunteers with technical
skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers, to
name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak and we
look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3.) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where we
can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host of
topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is
continuing to expand the products and resource materials
available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay the
groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain the
current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff and
manage all these projects for me and my family, today and into
the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather than
on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project which verbalizes some of the meaning of the work
everyone is doing to preserve our history for future generations.
Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us all better
insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects we hold so
dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can indeed
bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect...
and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please take
a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the words
to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all doing
together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a very
happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King
President
JewishGen, Inc.

******************************************
Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of course
many others who could be described as
anti-semitic. Hate isn't born >from itself. It is born because of
certain thoughtless actions >from some narrow-minded Poles and
Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must come to light
and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Re: Ordained Rabbi's in small villages #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

I don't know what the practice was back at the turn of the century. But
being ordained and earning a living are unrelated. Quite a few of the
members of my synagogue are ordained and earn their living doing other
things.

Pure guess. There were only a limited number of positions available. The
losers (i.e. those that weren't take up) would have to find other methods
to keep body and soul together.

On a seperate note. Quite a few famous rabbis did not have any official
capacity. The one that comes to mind as a well known example is the
Vilna Gaon.

<chaim>


Rabbis in 1870s Hungary #hungary

Jerry Zeisler <Jerry.Zeisler@...>
 

Dear H-Siggers,
I am researching my great-grandfather Joseph Zeisler. He practiced as a
reformed Rabbi (as noted by his title of "Rev. Joseph Zeisler, Rabbi," in
Peoria, Il in 1884. Joseph was born in Eger, Hungary and the family moved to
Budapest in his early youth.

I was wondering if anyone is familiar with the educational or religious
requirements for becoming a Rabbi in Hungary in the mid- to late 1870s?

Thank you.

Jerry Zeisler
jzeisler@... <mailto:jzeisler@...>
Leesburg, Virginia, USA


Message from Susan King #yizkorbooks

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

From: Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
Subject: JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey--A Look Forward into the New
Milennium!--Second Edition <grin>

The numbers are in . . . and by the looks of it, the year 2000 has been
another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no exception.


*Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million
searches performed in 2000
*Over 1457 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
*Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and
Research Group mailing lists in the year 2000
*Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with
an additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million
records all powered by JewishGen's servers
*255 Yizkor Book Translations Online up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
*422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truly, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse
people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the
thousands-- come together with a common mission and purpose,
participating and sharing in what we believe is one of the
largest grass roots efforts ever undertaken to preserve our
history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million
records awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries
throughout the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic, All Holocaust) which is going to take an
effort far beyond the capabilities of our current database team's
volunteer time. This means the pressing need for both full time
professional technical staff and volunteers with technical
skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers, to
name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak and we
look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3.) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where we
can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host of
topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is
continuing to expand the products and resource materials
available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay the
groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain the
current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff and
manage all these projects for me and my family, today and into
the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather than
on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project which verbalizes some of the meaning of the work
everyone is doing to preserve our history for future generations.
Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us all better
insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects we hold so
dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can indeed
bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect...
and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please take
a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the words
to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all doing
together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a very
happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King
President
JewishGen, Inc.

******************************************
Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of course
many others who could be described as
anti-semitic. Hate isn't born >from itself. It is born because of
certain thoughtless actions >from some narrow-minded Poles and
Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must come to light
and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Ordained Rabbi's in small villages #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

I don't know what the practice was back at the turn of the century. But
being ordained and earning a living are unrelated. Quite a few of the
members of my synagogue are ordained and earn their living doing other
things.

Pure guess. There were only a limited number of positions available. The
losers (i.e. those that weren't take up) would have to find other methods
to keep body and soul together.

On a seperate note. Quite a few famous rabbis did not have any official
capacity. The one that comes to mind as a well known example is the
Vilna Gaon.

<chaim>


Hungary SIG #Hungary Rabbis in 1870s Hungary #hungary

Jerry Zeisler <Jerry.Zeisler@...>
 

Dear H-Siggers,
I am researching my great-grandfather Joseph Zeisler. He practiced as a
reformed Rabbi (as noted by his title of "Rev. Joseph Zeisler, Rabbi," in
Peoria, Il in 1884. Joseph was born in Eger, Hungary and the family moved to
Budapest in his early youth.

I was wondering if anyone is familiar with the educational or religious
requirements for becoming a Rabbi in Hungary in the mid- to late 1870s?

Thank you.

Jerry Zeisler
jzeisler@... <mailto:jzeisler@...>
Leesburg, Virginia, USA


Given Names Data Bases for European Countries #courland #latvia

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Hi all,

I wrote recently to the Mailing List, stating that I would be
interested in Martha Lev-Zion's proposal of a project to record
gravestone information in US cemeteries where Kurland or Latvian
emigrants were buried. I have received several requests for more
information about the Given Names Data Bases which I mentioned as
possibly benefiting >from such a project. Here is a brief description
of the Given Names Project.

Our objective is to set up data bases for 14 European countries, each
data base to contain the given names used by our ancestors in that
country, along with linked given names which emigrants >from that
country adopted when they immigrated to any of 10 foreign
countries. The 14 European countries are: Austria-Hungary, Baltics,
Belarus, Denmark, Galicia, Germany, Holland, Lithuania, Poland,
Prussia, Romania, Russia, Sweden, and Ukraine. And the 10 foreign
countries to which they may have immigrated are: Argentina, Australia,
Brazil, Canada, Palestine, Mexico, South Africa, UK, and the US. The
time period covered is 1795 to 1925.

It has been shown that there is a statistical correlation between the
names used by Jews in European countries, and those adopted by them in
foreign countries of immigration, and our project takes advantage of
this correlation.

The given names which are recorded in the data bases for the 14
European countries are: Hebrew names, Yiddish names and Yiddish
nicknames, European secular names and nicknames (European secular names
are those used by both Jews and non-Jews in various European countries,
including the country of residence of the Jews). The foreign-country
given names which are recorded in the data base for each European
country are: Local given names and local nicknames. In many cases,
the origins of the Hebrew, Yiddish and Euro-secular names are given.

The European-country given names data have been obtained by mining it
from various European archival sources (government documents such as
Revision Lists, Jewish community lists, etc.) and >from given names
lists contributed by private Jewish genealogists, recording the data
separately for each country. Each record in a data base includes all
of the linked European names which are in the Hebrew, Yiddish, or
Euro-secular languages; some of these linked-name records have as many
as 30-40 linked-name variations, some only a few names.

The foreign-country secular names are linked to the European Hebrew,
Yiddish, and Euro-secular names by finding out what were the Hebrew,
Yiddish, or Euro-secular names of the immigrants, as well, of course,
as what were their foreign secular (e.g., English in the case of the
US) names. The immigrant's Hebrew, Yiddish, or Euro-secular names are
the link to who he was in his home country. This type of two-country
information is best found >from gravestone readings for those known to
have come >from one specific European country as an immigrant to the
foreign country, or >from private contributions by Jewish genealogists.

And there-in lies the most difficult part of our project -- finding and
recording all of the names of immigrants to a specific foreign
country. For many deceased Jews in the US, for example, their graves
are mixed together with immigrants >from other European countries, and
we have no straightforward way of determining the ancestral country of
an individual. However, in some cases, immigrants >from European
countries banded together, formed landsmanshaften, and purchased tracts
of cemetery lands in common for their group use; in such cases, we
know that most of those buried in those tracts were >from one certain
European country, say, Latvia. This approach can work in some US
cases, because landsmanshaften were quite commonly used as above in the
US. In the case of many other foreign countries, however, this
approach was not adopted and most foreign cemeteries contain mixtures
of immigrants' graves; in such cases, our research problem is much
more difficult.

If Martha's Latvian project gets off the ground for the US, that would
be a big help to our Latvian Given Names Data Base Project. For
Lithuania, I have been fortunate in that Ada Greenblatt of New York has
done extensive surveying of US Litvak cemetery tracts where it is known
that immigrants >from Lithuania are buried; Ada has read and recorded
all of the gravestone information, and has entered it in data
bases. And she has made these data available to me (Bless her!).

The result is that our Lithuania data base is now in its final stages
of checking and clean-up, and will be posted soon to a web site for
general access by Jewish genealogists. They will be able, for example,
to use the known given names of their relatives in the US to search the
data base for all of the possible given names (Hebrew, Yiddish, and
Euro-secular) which might have been used by their relative in
Lithuania. Since it was common for our European ancestors to use a
number of different names (as many as 20-30 in some cases) in different
government and community documents, this will greatly increase the
researcher's chances of finding the correct records. And the data base
can also be searched in the reverse sense -- searching it for an
ancestor's known European names to figure out what might have been the
linked English names he may have adopted upon immigrating to the US,
and therefor where he went in the US.

I hope that we can do the same for Latvia. We already have a good
start with European given names, but still have a long way to go for
foreign countries like the US. Martha's project could be very important!

Regards,

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@...


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Given Names Data Bases for European Countries #courland #latvia

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Hi all,

I wrote recently to the Mailing List, stating that I would be
interested in Martha Lev-Zion's proposal of a project to record
gravestone information in US cemeteries where Kurland or Latvian
emigrants were buried. I have received several requests for more
information about the Given Names Data Bases which I mentioned as
possibly benefiting >from such a project. Here is a brief description
of the Given Names Project.

Our objective is to set up data bases for 14 European countries, each
data base to contain the given names used by our ancestors in that
country, along with linked given names which emigrants >from that
country adopted when they immigrated to any of 10 foreign
countries. The 14 European countries are: Austria-Hungary, Baltics,
Belarus, Denmark, Galicia, Germany, Holland, Lithuania, Poland,
Prussia, Romania, Russia, Sweden, and Ukraine. And the 10 foreign
countries to which they may have immigrated are: Argentina, Australia,
Brazil, Canada, Palestine, Mexico, South Africa, UK, and the US. The
time period covered is 1795 to 1925.

It has been shown that there is a statistical correlation between the
names used by Jews in European countries, and those adopted by them in
foreign countries of immigration, and our project takes advantage of
this correlation.

The given names which are recorded in the data bases for the 14
European countries are: Hebrew names, Yiddish names and Yiddish
nicknames, European secular names and nicknames (European secular names
are those used by both Jews and non-Jews in various European countries,
including the country of residence of the Jews). The foreign-country
given names which are recorded in the data base for each European
country are: Local given names and local nicknames. In many cases,
the origins of the Hebrew, Yiddish and Euro-secular names are given.

The European-country given names data have been obtained by mining it
from various European archival sources (government documents such as
Revision Lists, Jewish community lists, etc.) and >from given names
lists contributed by private Jewish genealogists, recording the data
separately for each country. Each record in a data base includes all
of the linked European names which are in the Hebrew, Yiddish, or
Euro-secular languages; some of these linked-name records have as many
as 30-40 linked-name variations, some only a few names.

The foreign-country secular names are linked to the European Hebrew,
Yiddish, and Euro-secular names by finding out what were the Hebrew,
Yiddish, or Euro-secular names of the immigrants, as well, of course,
as what were their foreign secular (e.g., English in the case of the
US) names. The immigrant's Hebrew, Yiddish, or Euro-secular names are
the link to who he was in his home country. This type of two-country
information is best found >from gravestone readings for those known to
have come >from one specific European country as an immigrant to the
foreign country, or >from private contributions by Jewish genealogists.

And there-in lies the most difficult part of our project -- finding and
recording all of the names of immigrants to a specific foreign
country. For many deceased Jews in the US, for example, their graves
are mixed together with immigrants >from other European countries, and
we have no straightforward way of determining the ancestral country of
an individual. However, in some cases, immigrants >from European
countries banded together, formed landsmanshaften, and purchased tracts
of cemetery lands in common for their group use; in such cases, we
know that most of those buried in those tracts were >from one certain
European country, say, Latvia. This approach can work in some US
cases, because landsmanshaften were quite commonly used as above in the
US. In the case of many other foreign countries, however, this
approach was not adopted and most foreign cemeteries contain mixtures
of immigrants' graves; in such cases, our research problem is much
more difficult.

If Martha's Latvian project gets off the ground for the US, that would
be a big help to our Latvian Given Names Data Base Project. For
Lithuania, I have been fortunate in that Ada Greenblatt of New York has
done extensive surveying of US Litvak cemetery tracts where it is known
that immigrants >from Lithuania are buried; Ada has read and recorded
all of the gravestone information, and has entered it in data
bases. And she has made these data available to me (Bless her!).

The result is that our Lithuania data base is now in its final stages
of checking and clean-up, and will be posted soon to a web site for
general access by Jewish genealogists. They will be able, for example,
to use the known given names of their relatives in the US to search the
data base for all of the possible given names (Hebrew, Yiddish, and
Euro-secular) which might have been used by their relative in
Lithuania. Since it was common for our European ancestors to use a
number of different names (as many as 20-30 in some cases) in different
government and community documents, this will greatly increase the
researcher's chances of finding the correct records. And the data base
can also be searched in the reverse sense -- searching it for an
ancestor's known European names to figure out what might have been the
linked English names he may have adopted upon immigrating to the US,
and therefor where he went in the US.

I hope that we can do the same for Latvia. We already have a good
start with European given names, but still have a long way to go for
foreign countries like the US. Martha's project could be very important!

Regards,

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@...


Sites planned for Piotrkow-Tryb., Lask and Kamiensk #general

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Just a note to let you know that ShtetLinks web sites are in development
for the towns of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Lask and Kamiensk, Poland. Your
donations of information, written materials, documents and photographs are
welcome and necessary for the success of these web sites.

Please contact me for further information.

Happy New Year 2001,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas
Seflaum@...


Idaho -1908-1911 - family Reubens or Rubins #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

Between 1908 and 1911 Philip Goldberg >from Manchester UK went to Idaho
(>from Manchester) to "visit family and spent some time farm labouring",
then after some period returned to Manchester where he and his wife had
some more children.

I am looking for descendents of that Reuben family (not certain of the
spelling of the surname). Anybody out there where this rings a distant
bell? I am trying to find out exactly what family he did indeed visit and
the connection.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, UK

Still researching the following:-
1) KAMINSKY (possibly KAMENSHCHIK) >from Yanova ( Jonava) nr Kovno,
Lithuania2) DIAMOND (possibly DIMONT or DIAMONT) >from Kovno, Lithuania;
3) Newman, Emanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY, Chana & Yehuda LEV >from
KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - >from Poland; 5)
Chaim and Rebecca ESTRY - >from Poland; 6) GOLDBERG (possibly) SCHELENGER
in Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) >from Kovno, Lithuania;7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Idaho -1908-1911 - family Reubens or Rubins #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

Between 1908 and 1911 Philip Goldberg >from Manchester UK went to Idaho
(>from Manchester) to "visit family and spent some time farm labouring",
then after some period returned to Manchester where he and his wife had
some more children.

I am looking for descendents of that Reuben family (not certain of the
spelling of the surname). Anybody out there where this rings a distant
bell? I am trying to find out exactly what family he did indeed visit and
the connection.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, UK

Still researching the following:-
1) KAMINSKY (possibly KAMENSHCHIK) >from Yanova ( Jonava) nr Kovno,
Lithuania2) DIAMOND (possibly DIMONT or DIAMONT) >from Kovno, Lithuania;
3) Newman, Emanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY, Chana & Yehuda LEV >from
KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - >from Poland; 5)
Chaim and Rebecca ESTRY - >from Poland; 6) GOLDBERG (possibly) SCHELENGER
in Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) >from Kovno, Lithuania;7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sites planned for Piotrkow-Tryb., Lask and Kamiensk #general

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Just a note to let you know that ShtetLinks web sites are in development
for the towns of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Lask and Kamiensk, Poland. Your
donations of information, written materials, documents and photographs are
welcome and necessary for the success of these web sites.

Please contact me for further information.

Happy New Year 2001,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas
Seflaum@...


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Year End Message #yiddish

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

This year end/beginning message was received >from Susan King.
It warrants our attention and has been forwarded to the YT&V Research
Group as requested by Susan -

The numbers are in... and by the looks of it... the year 2000
has been another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no
exception.

- Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million searches
performed in 2000
- Over 1450 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
- Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and Research
Group mailing lists in the year 2000
- Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with an
additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million records,
all powered by JewishGen's servers
- 255 Yizkor Book Translations online, up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
- 422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truly, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse
people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the thousands--
come together with a common mission and purpose, participating and
sharing in what we believe is one of the largest grass roots efforts
ever undertaken to preserve our history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the United
States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million records
awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries throughout
the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic) which is going to take an effort far beyond
the capabilities of our current database team's volunteer time.
This means the pressing need for both full time professional technical
staff and volunteers with technical skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers,
to name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak
and we look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where
we can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host
of topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is continuing
to expand the products and resource materials available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay
the groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain
the current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff
and manage all these projects for me and my family, today and
into the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather
than on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project very recently verbalizing some of the meaning of
the work everyone is doing to preserve our history for future
generations. Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us
all better insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects
we hold so dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can
indeed bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect
... and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please
take a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the
words to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all
doing together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

>from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a
very happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King, President
JewishGen, Inc.


Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of course
many others who could be described as
anti-semitic. Hate isn't born >from itself. It is born because of
certain thoughtless actions >from some narrow-minded Poles and
Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must come to light
and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Year End Message #yiddish

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

This year end/beginning message was received >from Susan King.
It warrants our attention and has been forwarded to the YT&V Research
Group as requested by Susan -

The numbers are in... and by the looks of it... the year 2000
has been another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no
exception.

- Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million searches
performed in 2000
- Over 1450 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
- Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and Research
Group mailing lists in the year 2000
- Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with an
additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million records,
all powered by JewishGen's servers
- 255 Yizkor Book Translations online, up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
- 422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truly, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse
people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the thousands--
come together with a common mission and purpose, participating and
sharing in what we believe is one of the largest grass roots efforts
ever undertaken to preserve our history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the United
States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million records
awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries throughout
the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic) which is going to take an effort far beyond
the capabilities of our current database team's volunteer time.
This means the pressing need for both full time professional technical
staff and volunteers with technical skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers,
to name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak
and we look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where
we can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host
of topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is continuing
to expand the products and resource materials available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay
the groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain
the current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff
and manage all these projects for me and my family, today and
into the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather
than on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project very recently verbalizing some of the meaning of
the work everyone is doing to preserve our history for future
generations. Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us
all better insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects
we hold so dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can
indeed bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect
... and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please
take a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the
words to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all
doing together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

>from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a
very happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King, President
JewishGen, Inc.


Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of course
many others who could be described as
anti-semitic. Hate isn't born >from itself. It is born because of
certain thoughtless actions >from some narrow-minded Poles and
Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must come to light
and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Re: Surname Channensohn or Kannensohn #courland #latvia

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Margaret Kannensohn wrote:

" Does the surname "Channensohn" or "Kannensohn" ring any bells?"

It would seem that this name means the son of Chanan, where Chanan is a
Hebrew given name.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
<jerry@...>


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Re: Surname Channensohn or Kannensohn #courland #latvia

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Margaret Kannensohn wrote:

" Does the surname "Channensohn" or "Kannensohn" ring any bells?"

It would seem that this name means the son of Chanan, where Chanan is a
Hebrew given name.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
<jerry@...>