Date   

Re: Nationality (Polish or Austrian?) #galicia

Leslie Gyi <leslie@...>
 

Harvey Glatt <panthercat644@...> wrote:

Was someone born in Galicia considered a Pole or an Austrian?
I haven't spent as much time researching this area as Carpathia and
Sub-Carpathia, but what I found was there was no clear cut answers. I
suspect that with a little research the same is true of many Galacian towns.
For Carpathia and Sub-Carpathia, I had to go by town (since towns were under
up to 5 legal jurisdictions, and sometimes not the entire regions was
subject to the same jurisdiction. There was an equal amount of Yiddish
transliterations, I had to know all 10 names) and time periods, to determine
the jurisdiction, hence where the records were kept and in what language.

There was even a joke that it was one of the few places a person could live,
change nationality 5 times, and never moved >from their home. I have even
suggested to various SIGs (you need to belong to several to research certain
areas), that we have a database listing all known names for a town to cut
down on the confusion and work in doing research. Our current database only
contains the current legal name. We need to know all for genealogical
research in the past. Not a clear answer. Perhaps someone else has done
more detailed research of this area. My trip report only generally covered
this area, which is on the fringe of Carpathia, yet affected it. As I
recall the major players in the area were Poland, Galicia, Lithuania,
Russia, Ukraine, Soviet Union, Czech , Slovakia, Hungary and Germany, with
changing borders over time. So a time period would be the first place to
focus with a good historical map.

Leslie Gyi
Merrimack, NH
<leslie@...>

Researching:
FEIGs anywhere
POLLAKs in Carpathia
HAJNIK in Poland
GOLDENBERG in Poland


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Nationality (Polish or Austrian?) #galicia

Leslie Gyi <leslie@...>
 

Harvey Glatt <panthercat644@...> wrote:

Was someone born in Galicia considered a Pole or an Austrian?
I haven't spent as much time researching this area as Carpathia and
Sub-Carpathia, but what I found was there was no clear cut answers. I
suspect that with a little research the same is true of many Galacian towns.
For Carpathia and Sub-Carpathia, I had to go by town (since towns were under
up to 5 legal jurisdictions, and sometimes not the entire regions was
subject to the same jurisdiction. There was an equal amount of Yiddish
transliterations, I had to know all 10 names) and time periods, to determine
the jurisdiction, hence where the records were kept and in what language.

There was even a joke that it was one of the few places a person could live,
change nationality 5 times, and never moved >from their home. I have even
suggested to various SIGs (you need to belong to several to research certain
areas), that we have a database listing all known names for a town to cut
down on the confusion and work in doing research. Our current database only
contains the current legal name. We need to know all for genealogical
research in the past. Not a clear answer. Perhaps someone else has done
more detailed research of this area. My trip report only generally covered
this area, which is on the fringe of Carpathia, yet affected it. As I
recall the major players in the area were Poland, Galicia, Lithuania,
Russia, Ukraine, Soviet Union, Czech , Slovakia, Hungary and Germany, with
changing borders over time. So a time period would be the first place to
focus with a good historical map.

Leslie Gyi
Merrimack, NH
<leslie@...>

Researching:
FEIGs anywhere
POLLAKs in Carpathia
HAJNIK in Poland
GOLDENBERG in Poland


IAJGS: An Outstanding Salt Lake City Conference #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

Forwarded message >from JewishGen Discussion Group:

Genealogists Meet in Salt Lake City to Explore Their Jewish Heritage

Over 620 genealogists >from around the globe gathered in Salt Lake City
on July 9-14, 2000 for the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies' 20th International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. Representatives >from over 50 Jewish genealogical societies
attended.

The LDS Family History Library retains the largest amount of Jewish
records on microfilm in the world. On behalf of the Genealogical
Society of Utah, Richard E. Turley, Jr., Director of the Family History
Department, and Nancy
Goodstein, a volunteer at the Family History Library, presented a gift
of the multi-volume "Jewish Records in the Family History Library" index
and CD-ROM to the Association. Additionally, participants had access to
a special index of microfilms of Jewish vital records at the Lithuanian
archives, an exciting new finding aid.

Outstanding programs featured notable speakers, including Alexander
Abraham, Director of Yad Vashem in Israel; Alexandre Beider, author and
specialist in the field of Ashkenazic names; Angelika Ellmann-Krueger,
German research specialist, Dr. Michael Hammer, a geneticist noted for
his work on the kohanim gene; Regina Kopilevich, a Lithuanian
researcher; Marian Smith, Historian for the U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service; and Vladislav Soshnikov, Director of the
Russian-American Genealogical Archival Service, among others. Banquet
speakers, Eileen Douglas and Ron Steinman, presented a portion of their
upcoming film, "My Grandfather's House," a documentary about Ms.
Douglas' research that guided her back to her grandfather's Eastern
European origins.

Researchers enjoyed special "Breakfast With Experts" sessions and small
group tutorials designed to facilitate a productive interchange of
research tips on a variety of topics. Twenty special interest groups,
focused on the study of specific family surnames or research of a
certain geographical area, provided networking sessions to exchange new
information of interest to genealogists. These included researchers
interested in South Africa, Sephardic genealogy,
Latvia, Rzeszow, Grodno, Polonnye Uezd, Nesivizh, Denmark, South Africa,
Bohemia, Lodz, Belarus, Galicia, Germany, Romania, Litvak research,
Hungary, Suchostav Region, Kolbuszowa Region and the Mirvis family
surname.

"The astute planning, great programming, and excellent managing of the
IAJGS 20th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy really paid
dividends," stated Howard Margol of Atlanta, Georgia, president of
IAJGS. "Without a doubt, the conference was the friendliest on record.
Sufficient time was allowed to enable the attendees to do lots of
networking, renew old acquaintances, and make new contacts and friends.
All in all, every aspect of the conference was simply outstanding."

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' 21st
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy will be hosted by the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain, on July 8-13, 2001 in
London, England.

In 2002, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan will host the
Conference in Dearborn, Michigan. In 2003, the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Washington will host the Conference in Washington,
D.C.

For information on joining or creating a Jewish genealogical society,
visit our web site at <http://www.iajgs.org>

Marilyn R. Natchez
IAJGS Treasurer
MRNatchez@...

Submitted by Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia IAJGS: An Outstanding Salt Lake City Conference #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

Forwarded message >from JewishGen Discussion Group:

Genealogists Meet in Salt Lake City to Explore Their Jewish Heritage

Over 620 genealogists >from around the globe gathered in Salt Lake City
on July 9-14, 2000 for the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies' 20th International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. Representatives >from over 50 Jewish genealogical societies
attended.

The LDS Family History Library retains the largest amount of Jewish
records on microfilm in the world. On behalf of the Genealogical
Society of Utah, Richard E. Turley, Jr., Director of the Family History
Department, and Nancy
Goodstein, a volunteer at the Family History Library, presented a gift
of the multi-volume "Jewish Records in the Family History Library" index
and CD-ROM to the Association. Additionally, participants had access to
a special index of microfilms of Jewish vital records at the Lithuanian
archives, an exciting new finding aid.

Outstanding programs featured notable speakers, including Alexander
Abraham, Director of Yad Vashem in Israel; Alexandre Beider, author and
specialist in the field of Ashkenazic names; Angelika Ellmann-Krueger,
German research specialist, Dr. Michael Hammer, a geneticist noted for
his work on the kohanim gene; Regina Kopilevich, a Lithuanian
researcher; Marian Smith, Historian for the U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service; and Vladislav Soshnikov, Director of the
Russian-American Genealogical Archival Service, among others. Banquet
speakers, Eileen Douglas and Ron Steinman, presented a portion of their
upcoming film, "My Grandfather's House," a documentary about Ms.
Douglas' research that guided her back to her grandfather's Eastern
European origins.

Researchers enjoyed special "Breakfast With Experts" sessions and small
group tutorials designed to facilitate a productive interchange of
research tips on a variety of topics. Twenty special interest groups,
focused on the study of specific family surnames or research of a
certain geographical area, provided networking sessions to exchange new
information of interest to genealogists. These included researchers
interested in South Africa, Sephardic genealogy,
Latvia, Rzeszow, Grodno, Polonnye Uezd, Nesivizh, Denmark, South Africa,
Bohemia, Lodz, Belarus, Galicia, Germany, Romania, Litvak research,
Hungary, Suchostav Region, Kolbuszowa Region and the Mirvis family
surname.

"The astute planning, great programming, and excellent managing of the
IAJGS 20th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy really paid
dividends," stated Howard Margol of Atlanta, Georgia, president of
IAJGS. "Without a doubt, the conference was the friendliest on record.
Sufficient time was allowed to enable the attendees to do lots of
networking, renew old acquaintances, and make new contacts and friends.
All in all, every aspect of the conference was simply outstanding."

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies' 21st
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy will be hosted by the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain, on July 8-13, 2001 in
London, England.

In 2002, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan will host the
Conference in Dearborn, Michigan. In 2003, the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Washington will host the Conference in Washington,
D.C.

For information on joining or creating a Jewish genealogical society,
visit our web site at <http://www.iajgs.org>

Marilyn R. Natchez
IAJGS Treasurer
MRNatchez@...

Submitted by Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Khodorov Shul WWII #lithuania

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

I am seeking verification of the story below. Does anyone know about
this. If so please respond privately.

The story is during WWII the Nazis set afire the shul in Khodorov Galicia
Austria. My great uncle ran into the shul to rescue the Torah and upon
his exit, the Nazis machine gunned him to death. His son, now living in
Australia refuses to talk about anything that happened in WWII. He had
run >from the shul fire to the Polish underground and later to the Soviet
Army where he served in the battle of Stalingrad.

Louis A. Fine...WA state USA
E-mail <loufine@...>


Khodorov Shul WWII #lithuania

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

I am seeking verification of the story below. Does anyone know about
this. If so please respond privately.

The story is during WWII the Nazis set afire the shul in Khodorov Galicia
Austria. My great uncle ran into the shul to rescue the Torah and upon
his exit, the Nazis machine gunned him to death. His son, now living in
Australia refuses to talk about anything that happened in WWII. He had
run >from the shul fire to the Polish underground and later to the Soviet
Army where he served in the battle of Stalingrad.

Louis A. Fine...WA state USA
E-mail <loufine@...>


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Napoleon in Russia #lithuania

Amy Levinson <arl@...>
 

Since this inquiry has been submitted here, I wld like to add to it:

According to the 1983 Bialystok yizkorbook, Napoleon occupied Bialystok
for one year between 1795 (when it became part of Prussia in the 3rd
partition of Poland) and 1808 when it became part of Grodno Gubernia,
Russian empire.

Which year was that ?

Best wishes

Amy Levinson
Portland OR
==========================

Subject: Napoleon in Russia
From: Ray Stone <rstone@...>


Between June and December 1812, Napoleon's army cut a
devastating path through today's Belarus and Lithuania on
the way to Moscow and back. This invasion caused a great
upheaval in those lands, chasing many of our ancestors >from
their homes.

Does anyone know of first hand accounts by citizens of those
areas describing the effects of the invasion?


Re: Napoleon in Russia #general

Amy Levinson <arl@...>
 

Since this inquiry has been submitted here, I wld like to add to it:

According to the 1983 Bialystok yizkorbook, Napoleon occupied Bialystok
for one year between 1795 (when it became part of Prussia in the 3rd
partition of Poland) and 1808 when it became part of Grodno Gubernia,
Russian empire.

Which year was that ?

Best wishes

Amy Levinson
Portland OR
==========================

Subject: Napoleon in Russia
From: Ray Stone <rstone@...>


Between June and December 1812, Napoleon's army cut a
devastating path through today's Belarus and Lithuania on
the way to Moscow and back. This invasion caused a great
upheaval in those lands, chasing many of our ancestors >from
their homes.

Does anyone know of first hand accounts by citizens of those
areas describing the effects of the invasion?


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Napoleon in Russia #lithuania

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

I believe Jews celebrated the arrival of Napoleon in Russia. Certainly the
Jews of Svencionys (Shvinzion, Swienciany) remembered well the night
Napoleon stayed in their town. A description of this visit can be found in
the Svencionys Yizkor Book. An incident involving the Russian Huzzars
retreat >from Svencionys is included in Tolstoy's War and Peace.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
HURWITZ and RUDNITZKY >from Svencionys


Re: Napoleon in Russia #general

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

I believe Jews celebrated the arrival of Napoleon in Russia. Certainly the
Jews of Svencionys (Shvinzion, Swienciany) remembered well the night
Napoleon stayed in their town. A description of this visit can be found in
the Svencionys Yizkor Book. An incident involving the Russian Huzzars
retreat >from Svencionys is included in Tolstoy's War and Peace.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
HURWITZ and RUDNITZKY >from Svencionys


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Napoleon in Russia #lithuania

shirley holton <randsholton@...>
 

Not exactly first hand accounts but my grandmother who was born in Simnas
Lithuania circa 1870 to 1880 used to tell us how the villagers in her
childhood were still laughing at the way the French soldiers spoke, how they used to imitate them (she would give examples) and how cold the soldiers were, how they would shiver and how because of this farmers were able to sell them sheep fleeces at exorbitant prices (perhaps an early example of 'fleecing the tourists?')

Best wishes

Shirley Holton
London UK
randsholton@...


Napoleon in Russia #lithuania

shirley holton <randsholton@...>
 

Not exactly first hand accounts but my grandmother who was born in Simnas
Lithuania circa 1870 to 1880 used to tell us how the villagers in her
childhood were still laughing at the way the French soldiers spoke, how they used to imitate them (she would give examples) and how cold the soldiers were, how they would shiver and how because of this farmers were able to sell them sheep fleeces at exorbitant prices (perhaps an early example of 'fleecing the tourists?')

Best wishes

Shirley Holton
London UK
randsholton@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Napoleon #lithuania

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

Dear Litvaks:

I don't know about first-person accounts, but there was a legend about a
Napoleonic artifact in the synagogue in Olkenik (also supposedly in other
nearby shtetls). It states that the French general gave his jacket to the
Jewish community, whereupon it was made into a parochet (curtain) for the
ark in the local shul. The bubbe-meise is widespread and may have a grain
of truth in it somewhere!

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
San Antonio, Tx
hlb@...


Re: Napoleon #lithuania

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

Dear Litvaks:

I don't know about first-person accounts, but there was a legend about a
Napoleonic artifact in the synagogue in Olkenik (also supposedly in other
nearby shtetls). It states that the French general gave his jacket to the
Jewish community, whereupon it was made into a parochet (curtain) for the
ark in the local shul. The bubbe-meise is widespread and may have a grain
of truth in it somewhere!

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
San Antonio, Tx
hlb@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Lithuania films to Family History Centers #lithuania

Gary Mokotoff <mokotoff@...>
 

The Jewish Lithuanian microfilms made available initially at the recent
conference in Salt Lake City are available for distribution to local Family
History Centers, according to Kahlile Mehr of the Family History Department.

There was one incident where a person had difficulty getting films ordered
because the local people could not get the microfilm numbers to appear in
their database, but the matter was subsequently solved.

If you have problems ordering the films locally, be persistent. If
persistence does not work, contact me.

Gary Mokotoff
mokotoff@...


Re: Lithuania films to Family History Centers #lithuania

Gary Mokotoff <mokotoff@...>
 

The Jewish Lithuanian microfilms made available initially at the recent
conference in Salt Lake City are available for distribution to local Family
History Centers, according to Kahlile Mehr of the Family History Department.

There was one incident where a person had difficulty getting films ordered
because the local people could not get the microfilm numbers to appear in
their database, but the matter was subsequently solved.

If you have problems ordering the films locally, be persistent. If
persistence does not work, contact me.

Gary Mokotoff
mokotoff@...


Re: belarus digest: August 15, 2000 #belarus

Plutsk@...
 

In a message dated 08/16/2000 1:02:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Ray Rubin
writes:

My grandparents were >from // My
grandfather, Zender Roubenchik, was involved // My grandmother was //
Can anyone steer me where I can get any info on them.

Open letter to Ray: You know a lot of useful facts about your family, Ray,
and have a very good chance of learning quite a bit more. There are dozens
of places you should be looking, both domestic and foreign, on the internet
and through other sources.

If this posting is really your very first attempt to find your family, you
need to 1) Read Arthur Kurzweil's book ">from Generation to Generation"; 2)
study the FAQ's and the InfoFiles at www.jewishgen.org, 3) join and attend
meetings of the nearest Jewish Genealogical Society (there's a listing at the
Jewishgen web site); and 3) subscribe to "Avotaynu" magazine which you can
get via the Avotaynu.com web site.

If you depend on a totally open-ended question like the one above, you're
asking someone to teach you the field of genealogy and specifically Jewish
genealogy, and that isn't going to happen! Genealogy is, for better or
worse, a quintessentially self-taught avocation. Questions about SPECIFIC
research problems are good things to post; utterly general "how do I get
information about my family" questions are not. Good luck!

Steve Gold
Detroit area


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: belarus digest: August 15, 2000 #belarus

Plutsk@...
 

In a message dated 08/16/2000 1:02:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Ray Rubin
writes:

My grandparents were >from // My
grandfather, Zender Roubenchik, was involved // My grandmother was //
Can anyone steer me where I can get any info on them.

Open letter to Ray: You know a lot of useful facts about your family, Ray,
and have a very good chance of learning quite a bit more. There are dozens
of places you should be looking, both domestic and foreign, on the internet
and through other sources.

If this posting is really your very first attempt to find your family, you
need to 1) Read Arthur Kurzweil's book ">from Generation to Generation"; 2)
study the FAQ's and the InfoFiles at www.jewishgen.org, 3) join and attend
meetings of the nearest Jewish Genealogical Society (there's a listing at the
Jewishgen web site); and 3) subscribe to "Avotaynu" magazine which you can
get via the Avotaynu.com web site.

If you depend on a totally open-ended question like the one above, you're
asking someone to teach you the field of genealogy and specifically Jewish
genealogy, and that isn't going to happen! Genealogy is, for better or
worse, a quintessentially self-taught avocation. Questions about SPECIFIC
research problems are good things to post; utterly general "how do I get
information about my family" questions are not. Good luck!

Steve Gold
Detroit area


Re: definition of tribe and clan #dna

ushua weintraub <ushua@...>
 

If my understanding is corect,the first five books of the Old Testiment,
Torah has the listings of the tribes and clans. This is the foundation for
identification of an "orally" transmitted conection within the kohanninm and
livitinnim to this day. The 'marker'within the blood the clans of Kohath
(Aaron and 'his' sons)the kohannim and Merari(Moses's clan)the livitinnim of
the Tribe of Levi. With the 'Y'marker conection made in the priestly line,
the kohannim, the 'sons of Aaron',investigation into the sons of the
families of the clan of Merari,the livitinnim, those levites holy given to
Aaron and 'his' sons, can only further identify a distinct marker for the
desendants of the Israelites.

Hope this helps
Ushua


________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail >from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


Re: definition of tribe and clan #dna

Bcg <bcg@...>
 

Hi Charles

Try taking a look at the article linked to the main page of the
Familytreedna.com web site. At the bottom of the index page is a link to
NOVA, which will take you to an article published by the National Academy
of Sciences.

I think if you read the article it will explain what I mean when I use the
terms, however in general a clan is a family, or extended family and a
tribe would be many families together with common language customs, etc,
but with several progenitors who have intermarried over time so that their
genetic finger print would appear similar if plotted on a X, Y axis.

Bennett Greenspan FTDNA Houston

At 09:44 PM 08/14/2000, you wrote:
Could someone direct me to a reference which defines 'clan' and 'tribe' the
way they are being used here?

Thank you,

Charles Nydorf