Date   

Re: the best copies from LDS microfilms #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

the LDS has a service whereby you may order paper prints of any microfilm
page >from Salt Lake City. Your FHC should hae the form. The cost is 25
cents a page if you give them the exact location on a film, $2.50 if you
only give them a film number, minimum order is 2.50. They have 11 x 17
paper available, so you get 1:1 copies. The quality is staggeringly good.
I once asked for a copy of a page that was almost illegible except fro a
family name on the 'best available copy' of a film. The copy they made
from it was 50% legible. Sometimes, for your 25 cents, they send you 2
versions of a page, to make sure you can read it all.

If a film has illegible portions, check the inside of the box flap to see
if it's stamped 'best available copy'. If not, you can order one. Many
FHCs know how to do this - there's a form the librarian has to fill out -
but occasionally you run across one that doesn't know about ordering a
best available copy. I haven't figured out what to do in that case yet.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: the best copies from LDS microfilms #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

the LDS has a service whereby you may order paper prints of any microfilm
page >from Salt Lake City. Your FHC should hae the form. The cost is 25
cents a page if you give them the exact location on a film, $2.50 if you
only give them a film number, minimum order is 2.50. They have 11 x 17
paper available, so you get 1:1 copies. The quality is staggeringly good.
I once asked for a copy of a page that was almost illegible except fro a
family name on the 'best available copy' of a film. The copy they made
from it was 50% legible. Sometimes, for your 25 cents, they send you 2
versions of a page, to make sure you can read it all.

If a film has illegible portions, check the inside of the box flap to see
if it's stamped 'best available copy'. If not, you can order one. Many
FHCs know how to do this - there's a form the librarian has to fill out -
but occasionally you run across one that doesn't know about ordering a
best available copy. I haven't figured out what to do in that case yet.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


Re: risk of LDS baptism #general

Ellen Zyroff <ezyroff@...>
 

I am writing regarding messages about the perceived silliness of concern
about Mormons converting people without their permission:

Taken literally, this sounds like a “non problem,” but it’s not.

Symbols have power. History and life experience prove that symbolic acts
can threaten freedom, personal autonomy, and change people’s hearts and
minds. They can heal or they can hurt.

Several years ago it became known that the Mormons had begun systematically
baptizing Holocaust victims whose names they had identified as such. The
program was not haphazard, lighthearted, or “silly.” The motivation was
serious and Church resources were being used to accomplish the objectives
of the program. After serious protests >from Jewish groups, the Mormons
promised to stop that practice.

The insult and hurt at such a thing are deep. Jews who died because they
were Jews are considered in Jewish tradition to have died for the
sanctification of God’s name.

When an organized religion for which converting masses of people to a new
religious identity is a raison d’être works systematically to negate the
Jewishness of Holocaust victims after their death, it is historical and
documentary revisionism, a religious attack on Jewish martyrs, a violation
of their sacred memory, a theft of their proper identity, and an affront to
the integrity and equanimity of Jews of all generations. The same holds
true for surrogate baptizing, posthumous or otherwise, of any Jew.

Ellen Zyroff
ezyroff@...

----Original Message Follows----
From: Paul Silverstone <paulh2@...>
Subject: Re: risk of LDS baptism
Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2000 00:12:55 -0400

If one doesn't believe in baptism and the recipient of the conversion was
unaware, dead or unwilling, what difference does it make? Should one give
any credence to a process of this type?
Paul Silverstone

In a message dated 8/2/00 7:56:43 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> Akaha@... writes:
>
> << His second concern was that genealogy.com is available to anyone. He
> specifically mentioned that the mormons might access it and baptise
> everyone. Is there someone out there who can tell me precisely the risk
> that this might occur? Personally, it has never worried me, but I also
> have never given my data to the LDS for similar reasons. >>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: risk of LDS baptism #general

Ellen Zyroff <ezyroff@...>
 

I am writing regarding messages about the perceived silliness of concern
about Mormons converting people without their permission:

Taken literally, this sounds like a “non problem,” but it’s not.

Symbols have power. History and life experience prove that symbolic acts
can threaten freedom, personal autonomy, and change people’s hearts and
minds. They can heal or they can hurt.

Several years ago it became known that the Mormons had begun systematically
baptizing Holocaust victims whose names they had identified as such. The
program was not haphazard, lighthearted, or “silly.” The motivation was
serious and Church resources were being used to accomplish the objectives
of the program. After serious protests >from Jewish groups, the Mormons
promised to stop that practice.

The insult and hurt at such a thing are deep. Jews who died because they
were Jews are considered in Jewish tradition to have died for the
sanctification of God’s name.

When an organized religion for which converting masses of people to a new
religious identity is a raison d’être works systematically to negate the
Jewishness of Holocaust victims after their death, it is historical and
documentary revisionism, a religious attack on Jewish martyrs, a violation
of their sacred memory, a theft of their proper identity, and an affront to
the integrity and equanimity of Jews of all generations. The same holds
true for surrogate baptizing, posthumous or otherwise, of any Jew.

Ellen Zyroff
ezyroff@...

----Original Message Follows----
From: Paul Silverstone <paulh2@...>
Subject: Re: risk of LDS baptism
Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2000 00:12:55 -0400

If one doesn't believe in baptism and the recipient of the conversion was
unaware, dead or unwilling, what difference does it make? Should one give
any credence to a process of this type?
Paul Silverstone

In a message dated 8/2/00 7:56:43 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> Akaha@... writes:
>
> << His second concern was that genealogy.com is available to anyone. He
> specifically mentioned that the mormons might access it and baptise
> everyone. Is there someone out there who can tell me precisely the risk
> that this might occur? Personally, it has never worried me, but I also
> have never given my data to the LDS for similar reasons. >>


Re: Registration #latvia

MWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 8/3/00 11:58:50 AM GMT Daylight Time, hrhode@...
writes:

Regarding the questions about the Passlosen lists

Given why registration existed, one could not lose his registration. The
government invented registration so it could keep track of us.
So a person could not lose his registration.
One of the interesting points to emerge >from the Vedomosti research is
that identity documents could be cancelled and that at least some of these
were reported in the Official Newspaper of the day. Giving just a few
examples >from the period Hirsch Friedmann, of Grobina, had his passport
invalidated, S Friedlander had his passport cancelled having lost it.
Revocation of the right to reside within the empire occurred as the regular
penalty for crossing the state border of the empire without authority and
the person was barred >from returning. Permits were issued for temporary
periods and for a variety of purposes.
Being able to produce lawful dodcumentation proving the right to reside
was as important for the Jews of Courland as having a valid Green
Card/citizenship documentation for those who have emigrated in the USA. The
system of passes and residence registration did not only apply to the Jewish
community.

The issue surrounding identity cards is a hotly debated one here in
England. The government has proposed them but they have been successfully
resisted on a number of occasions. Such documents remain the norm on the
Continent however and, I believe, in Russia to this day. I personally
remember having to register in Helsinki in the 1970's with the local police
district as an "alien" while living there. Any change of address had to be
reported to them promptly. I mention this because it is often difficult to
understand the context of the documentation that exists for ancestors and the
communties they were part of.
None of this actually provides a specific answer to Dara Pearlman and
what happened to the Naftali brothers but it does indicate that there are
likely to be some interesting and lively debates to follow.
Meanwhile best regards to all with your searches
Constance Whippman [database co-ordinator]


Family Finder on Jewishgen #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

------- Forwarded message follows -------
Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries

The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.
The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.
The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.
The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.
As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.
For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm
For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.
Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Registration #latvia

MWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 8/3/00 11:58:50 AM GMT Daylight Time, hrhode@...
writes:

Regarding the questions about the Passlosen lists

Given why registration existed, one could not lose his registration. The
government invented registration so it could keep track of us.
So a person could not lose his registration.
One of the interesting points to emerge >from the Vedomosti research is
that identity documents could be cancelled and that at least some of these
were reported in the Official Newspaper of the day. Giving just a few
examples >from the period Hirsch Friedmann, of Grobina, had his passport
invalidated, S Friedlander had his passport cancelled having lost it.
Revocation of the right to reside within the empire occurred as the regular
penalty for crossing the state border of the empire without authority and
the person was barred >from returning. Permits were issued for temporary
periods and for a variety of purposes.
Being able to produce lawful dodcumentation proving the right to reside
was as important for the Jews of Courland as having a valid Green
Card/citizenship documentation for those who have emigrated in the USA. The
system of passes and residence registration did not only apply to the Jewish
community.

The issue surrounding identity cards is a hotly debated one here in
England. The government has proposed them but they have been successfully
resisted on a number of occasions. Such documents remain the norm on the
Continent however and, I believe, in Russia to this day. I personally
remember having to register in Helsinki in the 1970's with the local police
district as an "alien" while living there. Any change of address had to be
reported to them promptly. I mention this because it is often difficult to
understand the context of the documentation that exists for ancestors and the
communties they were part of.
None of this actually provides a specific answer to Dara Pearlman and
what happened to the Naftali brothers but it does indicate that there are
likely to be some interesting and lively debates to follow.
Meanwhile best regards to all with your searches
Constance Whippman [database co-ordinator]


Latvia SIG #Latvia Family Finder on Jewishgen #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

------- Forwarded message follows -------
Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries

The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.
The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.
The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.
The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.
As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.
For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm
For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.
Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


Warsaw Police Report #general

judith reinsdorf <REINSDORFsearch@...>
 

My Great Grandfather was found shot to death in his bathtub in Warsaw...
early 1900s. How could I search for a police report? I know his
religious name and secular. Through this I could learn many things it
would hopefully lead to a death certificate.
judith reinsdorf
las vegas nevada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Warsaw Police Report #general

judith reinsdorf <REINSDORFsearch@...>
 

My Great Grandfather was found shot to death in his bathtub in Warsaw...
early 1900s. How could I search for a police report? I know his
religious name and secular. Through this I could learn many things it
would hopefully lead to a death certificate.
judith reinsdorf
las vegas nevada


Re: risk of LDS baptism #general

MarlaJAP@...
 

Speaking as a Jew who grew up in a racially and religiously mixed
neighborhood, chumming around with Catholics and Protestants, and also as
one who currently lives in a city where Mormons are the majority religion:

Baptism, as I understand it, is a specific process during which the subject
must be (a) present, and (b) specifically agree to be baptised and accept
Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior. It does not seem possible to me
that a Mormon (or any other Christian) could even suggest developing a list
of names taken >from genealogy websites would constitute baptism.

Considering that the LDS church has created and maintained FHCs and the
Library, accessible to all persons, regardless of faith, my personal
inclination would be to put very little credence in such a possibility.

On the other hand, the cousin's concerns regarding publication of a maiden
name should be considered valid -- any given person's perception of a
situation is that person's reality. Therefore, perhaps the tree
information placed on genealogy.com should be modified to delete references
to that cousin and their branch of the family. It would leave a hole in
the tree, but better that than a tear ina family relationship!

That's just my personal opinion -- I'm more than willing to "hear" other
opinions and any evidence to the contrary...

Regards,

Marla Goldman
Mesa AZ

Researching:

GOLDMAN/CITRIN/KOPYT - Olyka, Volynia, Ukraine/Philadelphia PA/Boston MA
REINER - Germany/Russia/Rosenhayn NJ/Philadelphia PA/Boston MA
BLEICHER - Bucuresti/NYC NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: risk of LDS baptism #general

MarlaJAP@...
 

Speaking as a Jew who grew up in a racially and religiously mixed
neighborhood, chumming around with Catholics and Protestants, and also as
one who currently lives in a city where Mormons are the majority religion:

Baptism, as I understand it, is a specific process during which the subject
must be (a) present, and (b) specifically agree to be baptised and accept
Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior. It does not seem possible to me
that a Mormon (or any other Christian) could even suggest developing a list
of names taken >from genealogy websites would constitute baptism.

Considering that the LDS church has created and maintained FHCs and the
Library, accessible to all persons, regardless of faith, my personal
inclination would be to put very little credence in such a possibility.

On the other hand, the cousin's concerns regarding publication of a maiden
name should be considered valid -- any given person's perception of a
situation is that person's reality. Therefore, perhaps the tree
information placed on genealogy.com should be modified to delete references
to that cousin and their branch of the family. It would leave a hole in
the tree, but better that than a tear ina family relationship!

That's just my personal opinion -- I'm more than willing to "hear" other
opinions and any evidence to the contrary...

Regards,

Marla Goldman
Mesa AZ

Researching:

GOLDMAN/CITRIN/KOPYT - Olyka, Volynia, Ukraine/Philadelphia PA/Boston MA
REINER - Germany/Russia/Rosenhayn NJ/Philadelphia PA/Boston MA
BLEICHER - Bucuresti/NYC NY


Yizkor Book Project Update July 2000 #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

Yizkor Book Update July 2000

Despite the fact that many of us were busy in early July preparing for
and then attending the summer genealogy
meeting in Salt Lake City (let's not forget also unpacking and sorting
all the materials we collected at the conference when we returned home),
the project volunteers were still able to produce a prodigious amount of
work, which included 7 new books and updates of 11 books. In addition,
we have a new staff updating the Yizkor Book database, working under
John Berman, and it is our hope to get current in the very near future.

We now have 229 separate entries online at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html>

New Books

Pushelat, Lithuania
Radzymin, Poland
Sa'rospatak, Hungary
Stawiski, Poland
Stropkov, Slovakia
Strzyzow,Poland
Wegrow, Poland

Updated Books

Brody, Ukr
Grodno, Belarus
Ivye, Belarus
Jedwabne, Poland
Juechen, Germany
Polonnoye, Ukr
Rokiskis, Lithuania
Rzeszow, Poland
Sochaczew, Poland
Thessalonika, Greece
Yampol, Ukr

I would like to call your attention to two of the more interesting
pieces added this month. The necrology scroll of Sa'rospatak is unique
in its own right, but the fact that two of the Yizkor Book html staff
brought this wonderful piece to us is also worthy of mention.

A recent article published in a Polish newspaper has been added to the
Jedwadne site at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jedwabne/yed999.html> The historical
significance of this article is discussed in an introduction by Morlan
Ty Rogers. The writer of the article and the newspaper publisher were
eager to give JewishGen permission to publish a translation of this
article >from Polish to English, which was done by
a Yizkor Book Project volunteer, Joanna Zimmerman.

New fundraising projects

We also added three new fundraising projects in July. Online donations
to these projects can be made at
<http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html> At the
same time that you are checking off financial support for these
projects, it would be appreciated if you would also make a generous
donation to JewishGen, which provides infrastructure and other support
at no cost to the projects but at significant cost to JewishGen. Folks,
there "ain't no free lunch" and we are all going to have to help
JewishGen pay for its operational expenses.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Grodno, Belarus
Krynki, Poland
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova

Again, let me thank the volunteers who make the Yizkor Book Project so
successful and the donors who contribute the fruits of their work so
that we can preserve yizkor books, those unique historical documents, in
English. \We are indeed blessed to have so many dedicated and tireless
workers helping on this project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
--
Joyce Field
jfield@...
jfield@...

Submitted by Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Project Update July 2000 #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

Yizkor Book Update July 2000

Despite the fact that many of us were busy in early July preparing for
and then attending the summer genealogy
meeting in Salt Lake City (let's not forget also unpacking and sorting
all the materials we collected at the conference when we returned home),
the project volunteers were still able to produce a prodigious amount of
work, which included 7 new books and updates of 11 books. In addition,
we have a new staff updating the Yizkor Book database, working under
John Berman, and it is our hope to get current in the very near future.

We now have 229 separate entries online at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html>

New Books

Pushelat, Lithuania
Radzymin, Poland
Sa'rospatak, Hungary
Stawiski, Poland
Stropkov, Slovakia
Strzyzow,Poland
Wegrow, Poland

Updated Books

Brody, Ukr
Grodno, Belarus
Ivye, Belarus
Jedwabne, Poland
Juechen, Germany
Polonnoye, Ukr
Rokiskis, Lithuania
Rzeszow, Poland
Sochaczew, Poland
Thessalonika, Greece
Yampol, Ukr

I would like to call your attention to two of the more interesting
pieces added this month. The necrology scroll of Sa'rospatak is unique
in its own right, but the fact that two of the Yizkor Book html staff
brought this wonderful piece to us is also worthy of mention.

A recent article published in a Polish newspaper has been added to the
Jedwadne site at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jedwabne/yed999.html> The historical
significance of this article is discussed in an introduction by Morlan
Ty Rogers. The writer of the article and the newspaper publisher were
eager to give JewishGen permission to publish a translation of this
article >from Polish to English, which was done by
a Yizkor Book Project volunteer, Joanna Zimmerman.

New fundraising projects

We also added three new fundraising projects in July. Online donations
to these projects can be made at
<http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html> At the
same time that you are checking off financial support for these
projects, it would be appreciated if you would also make a generous
donation to JewishGen, which provides infrastructure and other support
at no cost to the projects but at significant cost to JewishGen. Folks,
there "ain't no free lunch" and we are all going to have to help
JewishGen pay for its operational expenses.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Grodno, Belarus
Krynki, Poland
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova

Again, let me thank the volunteers who make the Yizkor Book Project so
successful and the donors who contribute the fruits of their work so
that we can preserve yizkor books, those unique historical documents, in
English. \We are indeed blessed to have so many dedicated and tireless
workers helping on this project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
--
Joyce Field
jfield@...
jfield@...

Submitted by Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@...


JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries #galicia

Beverly <bev7@...>
 

-----Original Message-----

Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries


The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.

The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.

The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.

The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.

As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.

For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm

For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries #galicia

Beverly <bev7@...>
 

-----Original Message-----

Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries


The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.

The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.

The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.

The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.

As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.

For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm

For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries


The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.

The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.

The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.

The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.

As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.

For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm

For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Subject: JewishGen Family Finder reaches 200,000 entries


The JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) has reached another milestone.
As of today, there have been over 200,000 unique entries
submitted to the JGFF. The number of entries in the JGFF has
nearly doubled every year since going online at the JewishGen
website three years ago.

The JewishGen Family Finder is a database of surnames and towns
currently being researched by Jewish genealogists worldwide.
It contains ancestral surnames and town names, and is indexed
and cross-referenced by both surname and town name.

The JewishGen Family Finder is available for searching, entering
and modifying data online at the JewishGen website, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff.

The JGFF is a networking tool, designed to connect genealogists
with similar research interests. Its purpose is to allow people
who are researching the same surnames and towns to share
information with each other. All Jewish genealogists and those
who are interested in their Jewish heritage are encouraged to
participate.

As of August 2, 2000, the JGFF contained over 200,000 entries,
submitted by over 37,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The
database contains over 60,000 different surnames, and over
15,000 ancestral town names.

For more information about the history and growth of the
JewishGen Family Finder, see the press release at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/pr/jgff200K.htm

For complete information about the JewishGen Family Finder,
see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions About the
JewishGen Family Finder" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


(No subject) #hungary

Cnydorf@...
 

Dear H-sigers
Since there has been some discussion of the difficulty of looking up
Yiddish place names, I thought I would mention one source which is quite
limited at present but which has great future potential.
The Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry is a survey that was
conducted after WW II when European Jewish community had been destroyed and
their survivors dispersed. Its purpose was to collect information on the
language and culture of these destroyed communities by interviewing
survivors. Eastern Europe was divided into 488 quadrants. Individuals or
couples were found who had lived in communities within each of these
quadrants before 1939. They were given an interview of more than 3000
questions. They were asked the Yiddish name of their communities and also the
Yiddish names of the cities and towns that were nearby.
One set of 64 quadrants covered Slovakia, Hungary, Subcarpathian Ukraine,
and Transylvania. The Yiddish names of the communities of that represented
these quadrants can be found in The language and culture atlas of Ashkenazic
Jewry Volume II:Research Tools edited by Andrew Sunshine et. al.(Max Niemeyer
Verlag, Tuebingen,1995, ISBN 3-484-73004-8) pages 89-100.
Unfortunately the Yiddish names of the communities surrounding these 64
places are, at present inaccessible. The responses to the questionaire have
never been published or put on line and there is no present plan to do so.

Regards,

Charles Nydorf

mod.- In many cases the Yiddish name for a Hungarian town is also the German place name. For example, most if not all, Yiddish speaking
Hungarian Jews referred to Brastislava, not as Poszony (the Hungarian name for the city), but as Pressburg - the German name. In the most extensive
Hungarian gazetteers such as Magyar Helysegnev-Azonosito Szotar by Gyorgy Lelkes one can find the German name for all Hungarian towns and villages
that had such a name. This is a not a rule, and there are many exceptions. One prominent exception is the town of Ujfeherto, which among Yiddish
speaking Jews was (is) called Ratsferd. The name came about as a corruption of the name of a predecessor town called Regi Feherto. FYI the
meaning of uj (pronounced Uy - the beginning of the words sounds like ooh but the end of the word sounds like the end of the word Oy)means "new" [coincidentally "uj" rhymes with "newye"]; Regi (prounced "ray gee" - use a hard "g" ) means old or ancient). Feher means white. LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary (no subject) #hungary

Cnydorf@...
 

Dear H-sigers
Since there has been some discussion of the difficulty of looking up
Yiddish place names, I thought I would mention one source which is quite
limited at present but which has great future potential.
The Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry is a survey that was
conducted after WW II when European Jewish community had been destroyed and
their survivors dispersed. Its purpose was to collect information on the
language and culture of these destroyed communities by interviewing
survivors. Eastern Europe was divided into 488 quadrants. Individuals or
couples were found who had lived in communities within each of these
quadrants before 1939. They were given an interview of more than 3000
questions. They were asked the Yiddish name of their communities and also the
Yiddish names of the cities and towns that were nearby.
One set of 64 quadrants covered Slovakia, Hungary, Subcarpathian Ukraine,
and Transylvania. The Yiddish names of the communities of that represented
these quadrants can be found in The language and culture atlas of Ashkenazic
Jewry Volume II:Research Tools edited by Andrew Sunshine et. al.(Max Niemeyer
Verlag, Tuebingen,1995, ISBN 3-484-73004-8) pages 89-100.
Unfortunately the Yiddish names of the communities surrounding these 64
places are, at present inaccessible. The responses to the questionaire have
never been published or put on line and there is no present plan to do so.

Regards,

Charles Nydorf

mod.- In many cases the Yiddish name for a Hungarian town is also the German place name. For example, most if not all, Yiddish speaking
Hungarian Jews referred to Brastislava, not as Poszony (the Hungarian name for the city), but as Pressburg - the German name. In the most extensive
Hungarian gazetteers such as Magyar Helysegnev-Azonosito Szotar by Gyorgy Lelkes one can find the German name for all Hungarian towns and villages
that had such a name. This is a not a rule, and there are many exceptions. One prominent exception is the town of Ujfeherto, which among Yiddish
speaking Jews was (is) called Ratsferd. The name came about as a corruption of the name of a predecessor town called Regi Feherto. FYI the
meaning of uj (pronounced Uy - the beginning of the words sounds like ooh but the end of the word sounds like the end of the word Oy)means "new" [coincidentally "uj" rhymes with "newye"]; Regi (prounced "ray gee" - use a hard "g" ) means old or ancient). Feher means white. LS