Date   

(Poland) Emmanuel Ringelblum Warsaw Ghetto Archives On Display at Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Facing death in the Warsaw Ghetto, a Jewish team, led by Emmanuel
Ringelblum, hid a trove of documents they wrote to document the life and
death of the Warsaw ghetto. They hid the documents in milk cans and buried
them to be hidden >from the Nazis, once they realized the ghetto would be
liquidated and the ghetto survivors would be transported to death camps. The
milk cans were found in 1946 and the second part in 1950. Three members of
the team survived the war and were able to recover the hidden work.

There are 6,000 documents totaling over 35,000 pages. The documents are
written in Polish, Yiddish and some are in Hebrew and German. An English
version of the first volume is being prepared and a Polish translation of
the last volume is almost completed.

The archives has gone on display at the Jewish Historical Institute in
Warsaw. A team of 35 people worked on documenting the death toll in
ghetto known as Oyneg Shabbes, gathered the documents, which included secret
newspapers, ration coupons, postcards, medical prescriptions, entertainment
handbills, literary texts and more. The exhibit is free of charge between
November 16 and December 7 2017. The permanent exhibition "What we were
unable to shout out to the world" is dedicated to the Underground Archive
of the Warsaw Ghetto and to its creators.

On November 14, Polish President Andrzej Duda and his wife attended the
official opening of the permanent exhibition. The exhibit opened on the 70th
anniversary of the Jewish Historical Institute. To read the comments by
President Duda and Professor Pawel Spiewak see the JHI information at:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-11-14-official-opening-of-the-permanent-exhibition

And >from the JHI: http://tinyurl.com/yb6fadfy
Original url:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-10-23-permanent-exhibition-what-we-were-unable-to-shout-out-to-the-world-dedicated-to-the-underground-archive-of-the-warsaw-ghetto-and-to-its-creators

To read more about the exhibit see: http://tinyurl.com/y8bllw82
Original url:
https://sg.news.yahoo.com/secret-holocaust-era-archive-display-poland-113012075.html

At the IAJGS 2015 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Samuel
Kassow was the JGS Los Angeles Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture speaker
and his presentation was " The Secret Warsaw Ghetto Archive of Emanuel
Ringelblum" For those interested in learning more about the secret archive
his book, Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering A Hidden Archive from
the Warsaw Ghetto is an excellent resource. I have no affiliation with
Professor Kassow and am mentioning his book only as a reference to the
Ringelblum Archives.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Poland) Emmanuel Ringelblum Warsaw Ghetto Archives On Display at Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Facing death in the Warsaw Ghetto, a Jewish team, led by Emmanuel
Ringelblum, hid a trove of documents they wrote to document the life and
death of the Warsaw ghetto. They hid the documents in milk cans and buried
them to be hidden >from the Nazis, once they realized the ghetto would be
liquidated and the ghetto survivors would be transported to death camps. The
milk cans were found in 1946 and the second part in 1950. Three members of
the team survived the war and were able to recover the hidden work.

There are 6,000 documents totaling over 35,000 pages. The documents are
written in Polish, Yiddish and some are in Hebrew and German. An English
version of the first volume is being prepared and a Polish translation of
the last volume is almost completed.

The archives has gone on display at the Jewish Historical Institute in
Warsaw. A team of 35 people worked on documenting the death toll in
ghetto known as Oyneg Shabbes, gathered the documents, which included secret
newspapers, ration coupons, postcards, medical prescriptions, entertainment
handbills, literary texts and more. The exhibit is free of charge between
November 16 and December 7 2017. The permanent exhibition "What we were
unable to shout out to the world" is dedicated to the Underground Archive
of the Warsaw Ghetto and to its creators.

On November 14, Polish President Andrzej Duda and his wife attended the
official opening of the permanent exhibition. The exhibit opened on the 70th
anniversary of the Jewish Historical Institute. To read the comments by
President Duda and Professor Pawel Spiewak see the JHI information at:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-11-14-official-opening-of-the-permanent-exhibition

And >from the JHI: http://tinyurl.com/yb6fadfy
Original url:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-10-23-permanent-exhibition-what-we-were-unable-to-shout-out-to-the-world-dedicated-to-the-underground-archive-of-the-warsaw-ghetto-and-to-its-creators

To read more about the exhibit see: http://tinyurl.com/y8bllw82
Original url:
https://sg.news.yahoo.com/secret-holocaust-era-archive-display-poland-113012075.html

At the IAJGS 2015 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Samuel
Kassow was the JGS Los Angeles Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture speaker
and his presentation was " The Secret Warsaw Ghetto Archive of Emanuel
Ringelblum" For those interested in learning more about the secret archive
his book, Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering A Hidden Archive from
the Warsaw Ghetto is an excellent resource. I have no affiliation with
Professor Kassow and am mentioning his book only as a reference to the
Ringelblum Archives.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Breslavik, Poland? #general

Micah Salb
 

Folks:
I am researching family who reportedly came >from "Breslavik, Poland".
Does anyone know of that town?
Micah Salb


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Breslavik, Poland? #general

Micah Salb
 

Folks:
I am researching family who reportedly came >from "Breslavik, Poland".
Does anyone know of that town?
Micah Salb


Re: NYC Name Changes #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Scott D. Seligman posted:
I've just learned that the reason the trail of a woman I'm trying to trace
has gone cold is that she probably changed her name. I'm guessing this
would have occurred in New York City, but possibly in New York State,
in the late 1930s. Are such records available for search?

Scott: name changes are a state matter, like vital records. Different
states have different laws, requirements and restrictions; many follow
the usage method (changing it at will under common law) and in the
first half of the twentieth century that was common practice in New
York City.
Within New York State name changes can be performed in State Supreme
Court; for Manhattan County earlier records are indexed by the ledger
cards at the Old Records Division at 31 Chambers Street and that's
where i would look. There are similar County Courts in Brooklyn and
the Bronx.
For full details on indices and record locations see Estelle Guzik's
book "Genealogical Resources in New York".
Good luck with your search
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla V.P.Education,
JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education Researching (all
Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna ...SCHEINER, KANDEL
from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burshtyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: NYC Name Changes #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Scott D. Seligman posted:
I've just learned that the reason the trail of a woman I'm trying to trace
has gone cold is that she probably changed her name. I'm guessing this
would have occurred in New York City, but possibly in New York State,
in the late 1930s. Are such records available for search?

Scott: name changes are a state matter, like vital records. Different
states have different laws, requirements and restrictions; many follow
the usage method (changing it at will under common law) and in the
first half of the twentieth century that was common practice in New
York City.
Within New York State name changes can be performed in State Supreme
Court; for Manhattan County earlier records are indexed by the ledger
cards at the Old Records Division at 31 Chambers Street and that's
where i would look. There are similar County Courts in Brooklyn and
the Bronx.
For full details on indices and record locations see Estelle Guzik's
book "Genealogical Resources in New York".
Good luck with your search
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla V.P.Education,
JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education Researching (all
Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna ...SCHEINER, KANDEL
from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burshtyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database www.jri-poland.org

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets beginningwith the letter "S" the increase in online data
is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:
The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence.
In some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.net/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database www.jri-poland.org

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets beginningwith the letter "S" the increase in online data
is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:
The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence.
In some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.net/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania new article posted on LitvakSIG Online Journal #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The most recent issue of BAGEL SHOP, the Jewish Community of
Lithuania's publication. is now available to read on our Online
Journal

https://www.litvaksig.org/information-and-tools/online-journal/
jewish-community-of-lithuania-newsletter-no-22017.

Some of the articles include the Jews of Skuodas, the 120th birthday
of the Bund, Telsiai Yeshiva, Sugihara week in Lithuania, drawings of
synagogues, Genocide Day, Kaunas mikva and more.

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President


new article posted on LitvakSIG Online Journal #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The most recent issue of BAGEL SHOP, the Jewish Community of
Lithuania's publication. is now available to read on our Online
Journal

https://www.litvaksig.org/information-and-tools/online-journal/
jewish-community-of-lithuania-newsletter-no-22017.

Some of the articles include the Jews of Skuodas, the 120th birthday
of the Bund, Telsiai Yeshiva, Sugihara week in Lithuania, drawings of
synagogues, Genocide Day, Kaunas mikva and more.

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President


JRI Poland #Poland (Poland) Emmanuel Ringelblum Warsaw Ghetto Archives On Display at Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Facing death in the Warsaw Ghetto, a Jewish team, led by Emmanuel
Ringelblum, hid a trove of documents they wrote to document the life and
death of the Warsaw ghetto. They hid the documents in milk cans and buried
them to be hidden >from the Nazis, once they realized the ghetto would be
liquidated and the ghetto survivors would be transported to death camps. The
milk cans were found in 1946 and the second part in 1950. Three members of
the team survived the war and were able to recover the hidden work.

There are 6,000 documents totaling over 35,000 pages. The documents are
written in Polish, Yiddish and some are in Hebrew and German. An English
version of the first volume is being prepared and a Polish translation of
the last volume is almost completed.

The archives has gone on display at the Jewish Historical Institute in
Warsaw. A team of 35 people worked on documenting the death toll in
ghetto known as Oyneg Shabbes, gathered the documents, which included secret
newspapers, ration coupons, postcards, medical prescriptions, entertainment
handbills, literary texts and more. The exhibit is free of charge between
November 16 and December 7 2017. The permanent exhibition "What we were
unable to shout out to the world" is dedicated to the Underground Archive
of the Warsaw Ghetto and to its creators.

On November 14, Polish President Andrzej Duda and his wife attended the
official opening of the permanent exhibition. The exhibit opened on the 70th
anniversary of the Jewish Historical Institute. To read the comments by
President Duda and Professor Pawel Spiewak see the JHI information at:

http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-11-14-official-opening-of-the-permanent-exhib
ition

And >from the JHI:
http://tinyurl.com/yb6fadfy

Original url:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-10-23-permanent-exhibition-what-we-were-
unable-to-shout-out-to-the-world-dedicated-to-the-underground-archive-
of-the-warsaw-ghetto-and-to-its-creators

To read more about the exhibit see:
http://tinyurl.com/y8bllw82
Original url:
https://sg.news.yahoo.com/secret-holocaust-era-archive-display-poland-113012
075.html

At the IAJGS 2015 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Samuel
Kassow was the JGS Los Angeles Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture speaker
and his presentation was " The Secret Warsaw Ghetto Archive of Emanuel
Ringelblum" For those interested in learning more about the secret archive
his book, Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering A Hidden Archive from
the Warsaw Ghetto is an excellent resource. I have no affiliation with
Professor Kassow and am mentioning his book only as a reference to the
Ringelblum Archives.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


(Poland) Emmanuel Ringelblum Warsaw Ghetto Archives On Display at Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Facing death in the Warsaw Ghetto, a Jewish team, led by Emmanuel
Ringelblum, hid a trove of documents they wrote to document the life and
death of the Warsaw ghetto. They hid the documents in milk cans and buried
them to be hidden >from the Nazis, once they realized the ghetto would be
liquidated and the ghetto survivors would be transported to death camps. The
milk cans were found in 1946 and the second part in 1950. Three members of
the team survived the war and were able to recover the hidden work.

There are 6,000 documents totaling over 35,000 pages. The documents are
written in Polish, Yiddish and some are in Hebrew and German. An English
version of the first volume is being prepared and a Polish translation of
the last volume is almost completed.

The archives has gone on display at the Jewish Historical Institute in
Warsaw. A team of 35 people worked on documenting the death toll in
ghetto known as Oyneg Shabbes, gathered the documents, which included secret
newspapers, ration coupons, postcards, medical prescriptions, entertainment
handbills, literary texts and more. The exhibit is free of charge between
November 16 and December 7 2017. The permanent exhibition "What we were
unable to shout out to the world" is dedicated to the Underground Archive
of the Warsaw Ghetto and to its creators.

On November 14, Polish President Andrzej Duda and his wife attended the
official opening of the permanent exhibition. The exhibit opened on the 70th
anniversary of the Jewish Historical Institute. To read the comments by
President Duda and Professor Pawel Spiewak see the JHI information at:

http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-11-14-official-opening-of-the-permanent-exhib
ition

And >from the JHI:
http://tinyurl.com/yb6fadfy

Original url:
http://www.jhi.pl/en/blog/2017-10-23-permanent-exhibition-what-we-were-
unable-to-shout-out-to-the-world-dedicated-to-the-underground-archive-
of-the-warsaw-ghetto-and-to-its-creators

To read more about the exhibit see:
http://tinyurl.com/y8bllw82
Original url:
https://sg.news.yahoo.com/secret-holocaust-era-archive-display-poland-113012
075.html

At the IAJGS 2015 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Samuel
Kassow was the JGS Los Angeles Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture speaker
and his presentation was " The Secret Warsaw Ghetto Archive of Emanuel
Ringelblum" For those interested in learning more about the secret archive
his book, Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering A Hidden Archive from
the Warsaw Ghetto is an excellent resource. I have no affiliation with
Professor Kassow and am mentioning his book only as a reference to the
Ringelblum Archives.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JRI Poland #Poland Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database www.jri-poland.org

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets beginningwith the letter "S" the increase in online data
is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:
The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence.
In some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.net/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database www.jri-poland.org

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets beginningwith the letter "S" the increase in online data
is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:
The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence.
In some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.net/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


Warsaw Conference... #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All

In light of the recent announcements regarding the 2018 IAJGS Conference
in Warsaw, we would be interested in learning if any of you are
considering attendance there, and/or presenting a session.

Rosanne Leeson
Pierre Hahn,
Coordinators Frencsh SIG


French SIG #France Warsaw Conference... #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All

In light of the recent announcements regarding the 2018 IAJGS Conference
in Warsaw, we would be interested in learning if any of you are
considering attendance there, and/or presenting a session.

Rosanne Leeson
Pierre Hahn,
Coordinators Frencsh SIG


Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #general

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database http://www.jri-poland.org .

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets with the letter "S" the increase in online data is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:

The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence. In
some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.org/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Plock Books of Residents - all data now searchable online #general

Stanley Diamond
 

On behalf of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, it is with great pleasure
that I am able to announce that all 17,200 entries in the 1878-1897 Plock
Books of Residents project are now searchable online in the JRI-Poland
database http://www.jri-poland.org .

We are indebted to the project leader Tony Hausner, and the many
researchers, the Gombin Jewish Historical & Genealogical Society and the
Plotzker Young Men's Independent Association, all of whom gave their
generous support to the project.

As researchers may be aware, the data was released in phases as funds were
raised. Until recently only entries for families living on streets with
names starting with the letters A to P were available. Since there are
many streets with the letter "S" the increase in online data is substantial.

Here is an overview of the Plock Books of Residents project:

The entries have detailed information on 17,200 individuals, a remarkable
resource for those researching ancestors living in Plock who were born as
early as 1786. There are more than 4400 different surnames (and spelling
variations) and more than 700 other towns mentioned in the database.

Thus, if your family lived anywhere near Plock, you should be checking to
see if any relatives appear in this data.

Books of Residents are a house-by-house census of the families living in
the town. Town officials updated the information for each family on an
ongoing basis over time and recorded all the people living in the house
and moving in and out.

Each entry includes Name, Surname, Father's Name, Mother's Name,
Occupation, Date and Place of Birth or previous place of residence. In
some cases, Dates of Death, Marriage, and Draft Status or other
informative notes are included.

For a full description of Books of Residents, go to
http://jri-poland.org/bor.htm

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
For the Board of JRI-Poland


POLISHOVSKI / MYER MYERS #general

myers.r.jacob@...
 

Hey!

I'm looking into my families ancestry, and trying to find out about one
of my great granddads, unfortunately i don't have much information, but
I've been told that he changed his surname >from Polishovski to Myers in
attempt to make crossing the border >from Little Russia easier and to
stay undetected >from the Nazi's.

Does anyone have any validation or more information they can give?

I lived in the UK over 11 years ago, but we moved to New Zealand when
i was 8. (Now 19)

Thanks!
Jacob Myers


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen POLISHOVSKI / MYER MYERS #general

myers.r.jacob@...
 

Hey!

I'm looking into my families ancestry, and trying to find out about one
of my great granddads, unfortunately i don't have much information, but
I've been told that he changed his surname >from Polishovski to Myers in
attempt to make crossing the border >from Little Russia easier and to
stay undetected >from the Nazi's.

Does anyone have any validation or more information they can give?

I lived in the UK over 11 years ago, but we moved to New Zealand when
i was 8. (Now 19)

Thanks!
Jacob Myers

60761 - 60780 of 671867