Date   

Burial Societies #general

Patricia Adams
 

When a Genner helped me find the cemetery where my grandparents were buried,
I learned that the burial society was Ostrover Lodge #421.

The cemetery advised that this lodge was no longer in existence. My
question is would the name of the lodge possibly refer to the name of the
shetl where they had come from? Who would determine where they would be
buried?

The cemetery is Beth David in Elmont NY. the dates of death were 1940 and
1948.

Thank for any information and help.

Patricia Adams
P.O. Box 38
Alstead, NH 03602
pla@sover.net
Researching: Smith,Schmid,Przuczecka,Rosenthal,Dubin,Schneider

MODERATOR NOTE: Burial societies and landsmanshaften have
been discussed many times in this forum. For a full review
of what has been asked and answered, check out the JewishGen
Discussion Group Archived Messages accessed through Databases
on the homepage <http://www.jewishgen.org>


Re: likely port of entry for Iowa? #general

Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

My wife comes >from a small town in Iowa. We had success by writing the
Reference Librarian at the Public Library in the County seat. She put us
on to the head of the local genealogical society, who sent us an amazing
amount of documentation and only charged ten dollars.


--
Al Rosenfield
1650 Ridgway Pl., Columbus OH 43212 USA
phone: 614/486-8892; fax: 614/481-8038
e-mail <arosen@gcfn.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Burial Societies #general

Patricia Adams
 

When a Genner helped me find the cemetery where my grandparents were buried,
I learned that the burial society was Ostrover Lodge #421.

The cemetery advised that this lodge was no longer in existence. My
question is would the name of the lodge possibly refer to the name of the
shetl where they had come from? Who would determine where they would be
buried?

The cemetery is Beth David in Elmont NY. the dates of death were 1940 and
1948.

Thank for any information and help.

Patricia Adams
P.O. Box 38
Alstead, NH 03602
pla@sover.net
Researching: Smith,Schmid,Przuczecka,Rosenthal,Dubin,Schneider

MODERATOR NOTE: Burial societies and landsmanshaften have
been discussed many times in this forum. For a full review
of what has been asked and answered, check out the JewishGen
Discussion Group Archived Messages accessed through Databases
on the homepage <http://www.jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: likely port of entry for Iowa? #general

Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

My wife comes >from a small town in Iowa. We had success by writing the
Reference Librarian at the Public Library in the County seat. She put us
on to the head of the local genealogical society, who sent us an amazing
amount of documentation and only charged ten dollars.


--
Al Rosenfield
1650 Ridgway Pl., Columbus OH 43212 USA
phone: 614/486-8892; fax: 614/481-8038
e-mail <arosen@gcfn.org>


More Clarification re my Jewsish Theatre message #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

I have received still more inquiries regarding the message
I recently posted about my compilation of books about Jewish
Theater Performers and Boxers.

1. Apparently I now have to stress again that I am compiling
a list of BOOKS. I am NOT making a list of performers, writers,
theater managers, et al..

Such a huge task has already been done, to a great extent,
in the publication: "Leksikon fun yidishn teyater" (Lexicon of
the Yiddish Theatre), compiled by Zalman Zilbertsvayg in Los
Angeles and published in Mexico. This is a multi-volume set which
can be seen at the New York Public Library on 42nd Street and Fifth
Avenue or at the Hebrew Actors' Union, whose address is:

Hebrew Actors Union
Incorporated
31 E 7th St, New York, NY
10003-8093
Tel: 212-674-1923

The Lexicon is written in Yiddish. But perhaps a member
of the Union would be willing to look up someone's relative if
asked by phone call or letter.


2. I do not possess any books on Jewish Theater or
performers, writers, et al., Some aspects of the theater and
certain participants are indeed mentioned in a number of history
books I do have and by consulting them I was able to tell one
Jewishgenner quite a lot about a playwright ancestor of his.

3. I am not a specialist in Jewish Theater and I know
nothing about sports or sports figures.

4. Furthermore I have no particular or personal interest
in Jewish Theater and, to my present knowledge, have no
relatives who were involved in the Theater, Jewish or Gentile,
(except for my daughter who was a professional ballet dancer and
now teaches).

5. Thus far, I have entertained no idea of compiling a
list of books regarding Jewish boxers or other sports figures.
I hope that someone else will volunteer to take on that sort
of compilation..

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
98/12/31


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More Clarification re my Jewsish Theatre message #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

I have received still more inquiries regarding the message
I recently posted about my compilation of books about Jewish
Theater Performers and Boxers.

1. Apparently I now have to stress again that I am compiling
a list of BOOKS. I am NOT making a list of performers, writers,
theater managers, et al..

Such a huge task has already been done, to a great extent,
in the publication: "Leksikon fun yidishn teyater" (Lexicon of
the Yiddish Theatre), compiled by Zalman Zilbertsvayg in Los
Angeles and published in Mexico. This is a multi-volume set which
can be seen at the New York Public Library on 42nd Street and Fifth
Avenue or at the Hebrew Actors' Union, whose address is:

Hebrew Actors Union
Incorporated
31 E 7th St, New York, NY
10003-8093
Tel: 212-674-1923

The Lexicon is written in Yiddish. But perhaps a member
of the Union would be willing to look up someone's relative if
asked by phone call or letter.


2. I do not possess any books on Jewish Theater or
performers, writers, et al., Some aspects of the theater and
certain participants are indeed mentioned in a number of history
books I do have and by consulting them I was able to tell one
Jewishgenner quite a lot about a playwright ancestor of his.

3. I am not a specialist in Jewish Theater and I know
nothing about sports or sports figures.

4. Furthermore I have no particular or personal interest
in Jewish Theater and, to my present knowledge, have no
relatives who were involved in the Theater, Jewish or Gentile,
(except for my daughter who was a professional ballet dancer and
now teaches).

5. Thus far, I have entertained no idea of compiling a
list of books regarding Jewish boxers or other sports figures.
I hope that someone else will volunteer to take on that sort
of compilation..

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
98/12/31


Hebrew writing #general

Gail Mittelman <gailmann@...>
 

Good news bad news. I found a postcard to my great grandfather.
I am hoping it is >from relatives who stayed behind in Russia.
The bad news is it is in Hebrew handwriting which I can not read.
Anyone who can help me? I have scanned the photo and writings.

Happy New Year to all!!
Gail

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew writing #general

Gail Mittelman <gailmann@...>
 

Good news bad news. I found a postcard to my great grandfather.
I am hoping it is >from relatives who stayed behind in Russia.
The bad news is it is in Hebrew handwriting which I can not read.
Anyone who can help me? I have scanned the photo and writings.

Happy New Year to all!!
Gail

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Genealogy and Games #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

Does anyone have the family tradition of playing the German game Bell and
Hammer (Glocke und Hammer) at Hanuka? If so, I would be interested to hear
from them.
Thanks

Nick Landau
London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy and Games #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

Does anyone have the family tradition of playing the German game Bell and
Hammer (Glocke und Hammer) at Hanuka? If so, I would be interested to hear
from them.
Thanks

Nick Landau
London


Jewish Boxers #general

Len Pincus <lennyp@...>
 

I thought I might pass this on to the group. To find articles about all
sorts of boxers including Jewish boxers the New York Times Indicies are
invaluable. The period of about 1915-1930 was when the boxing ring was full
of Jewish boxers trying to improve their lot by becoming champs. My uncle
Nat PINCUS and my father Johnny PINCUS both achieved some notoriety as the
PINCUS boys >from Brownsville. I have used this resource very effectively.

Len Pincus

lenny@inorbit.com or lennyp@pe.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Boxers #general

Len Pincus <lennyp@...>
 

I thought I might pass this on to the group. To find articles about all
sorts of boxers including Jewish boxers the New York Times Indicies are
invaluable. The period of about 1915-1930 was when the boxing ring was full
of Jewish boxers trying to improve their lot by becoming champs. My uncle
Nat PINCUS and my father Johnny PINCUS both achieved some notoriety as the
PINCUS boys >from Brownsville. I have used this resource very effectively.

Len Pincus

lenny@inorbit.com or lennyp@pe.net


Filing all those documents: yuk! #general

james gross <larklane@...>
 

Hello,
Here is a very elementary but important item. You have just
found those naturalizations/census/vital records for your
relative. You are feeling very proud of your accomplishment too.
This may be your first or your 10th record. Maybe you've been
at this for a few months, maybe a few years. Regardless, you
have an unruly pile of papers and it takes you a year to find
anything. What do you do?

I have bought standard 3 ring binders, some flexible plastic and
some hard plastic. The exact type is unimportant. I also picked up
8 1/2 x 11" plastic tab dividers. I then bought a lot of top loading
nonstick poly-vu, (non pvc) archival safe, sheet protectors. Ok, so
where do I put these documents after I place them in the plastic
sheets?
Those binders I bought were of 2 colors. I picked up red and blue.
I split them up by grandparent gender. I gave red to my (maternal)
grandmothers family, blue to my grandfathers family, (paternal) red
to my bubbi's family, and blue to my Zaida's family.
In other words, I had created 4 sets of binders, based on color.
To further assist me, I placed the maternal binders on one side of
an extra large bookcase, and the paternal binders on the other side.
They are separated by solid wood partitions. In the middle I have a
large shelf space containing a quantity of reference material.
OK, so I have managed to sort the binders into colors and they
each get their own private space. What next? I took the plastic tab
dividers and wrote one for every deceased member of my family.
Where I have space, I put a few families together. So my
grandmother (in her red binder) and her siblings are all sitting in their
own area. Within each binder, as exemplified by my grandmother,
goes their spouse and children. Each person has a tabbed divider.
Next, I wasn't done. I then bought 3 one inch binders and created
my cemetary index. Each cemetary received a plastic tab divider
and all my cemetary photos were placed in photo refills and punched
with a 3 ring hole puncher. This way I could grab a cemetary book
and see whichever grave I needed to see.
Ok, you are totally worn out by all this exertion. You may be saying
to yourself," How do all of these binders help me? " The answer is
simple: efficiency. Whether you use this simple style of organization
or your own method, the object is to make it VERY EASY and FAST
to find that cemetary photo or the naturalization for your grandfather.
Only recently, in speaking to a genealogy buddy, did I realize that
everyone is not set up to quickly pull documents. Since I am already
organized, I had assumed everyone would think of this idea. So, if you
don't yet have your documents organized and indexed in some fashion,
I strongly urge you to sit on the floor with your binders and tab
dividers,
and physically organize all of that paper. I know it will take some time,
as it took me a while. But when you are finally done this project, you
will appreciate the ease of access and time savings!

James H. Gross
Cherry Hill, N.J.
e-mail: larklane@juno.com
Gross-Steinberg Family Tree
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6721/


MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks to the suggestions above, I have
just made New Year's Resolution #1!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Filing all those documents: yuk! #general

james gross <larklane@...>
 

Hello,
Here is a very elementary but important item. You have just
found those naturalizations/census/vital records for your
relative. You are feeling very proud of your accomplishment too.
This may be your first or your 10th record. Maybe you've been
at this for a few months, maybe a few years. Regardless, you
have an unruly pile of papers and it takes you a year to find
anything. What do you do?

I have bought standard 3 ring binders, some flexible plastic and
some hard plastic. The exact type is unimportant. I also picked up
8 1/2 x 11" plastic tab dividers. I then bought a lot of top loading
nonstick poly-vu, (non pvc) archival safe, sheet protectors. Ok, so
where do I put these documents after I place them in the plastic
sheets?
Those binders I bought were of 2 colors. I picked up red and blue.
I split them up by grandparent gender. I gave red to my (maternal)
grandmothers family, blue to my grandfathers family, (paternal) red
to my bubbi's family, and blue to my Zaida's family.
In other words, I had created 4 sets of binders, based on color.
To further assist me, I placed the maternal binders on one side of
an extra large bookcase, and the paternal binders on the other side.
They are separated by solid wood partitions. In the middle I have a
large shelf space containing a quantity of reference material.
OK, so I have managed to sort the binders into colors and they
each get their own private space. What next? I took the plastic tab
dividers and wrote one for every deceased member of my family.
Where I have space, I put a few families together. So my
grandmother (in her red binder) and her siblings are all sitting in their
own area. Within each binder, as exemplified by my grandmother,
goes their spouse and children. Each person has a tabbed divider.
Next, I wasn't done. I then bought 3 one inch binders and created
my cemetary index. Each cemetary received a plastic tab divider
and all my cemetary photos were placed in photo refills and punched
with a 3 ring hole puncher. This way I could grab a cemetary book
and see whichever grave I needed to see.
Ok, you are totally worn out by all this exertion. You may be saying
to yourself," How do all of these binders help me? " The answer is
simple: efficiency. Whether you use this simple style of organization
or your own method, the object is to make it VERY EASY and FAST
to find that cemetary photo or the naturalization for your grandfather.
Only recently, in speaking to a genealogy buddy, did I realize that
everyone is not set up to quickly pull documents. Since I am already
organized, I had assumed everyone would think of this idea. So, if you
don't yet have your documents organized and indexed in some fashion,
I strongly urge you to sit on the floor with your binders and tab
dividers,
and physically organize all of that paper. I know it will take some time,
as it took me a while. But when you are finally done this project, you
will appreciate the ease of access and time savings!

James H. Gross
Cherry Hill, N.J.
e-mail: larklane@juno.com
Gross-Steinberg Family Tree
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6721/


MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks to the suggestions above, I have
just made New Year's Resolution #1!


Meaning of name WEINTRAUB #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: Weintraub"fruit of the vine" or "grape stompers"?
.The Askenazi side of the clan uses "fruit of
the vine"as the meaning for Weintraub.The Sephardic side of the clan
uses "grape stompers".I find it an anti-semetic gesture by the Sephardic
Weintraub's to refer to us as "grape stompers".Are there Sephardic
Weintraub's that refer to themselves as "fruit of the vine"? As far as I
can find out Weintraub is a transliteration >from the Hebrew and makes
all Weintraub's direct desendants of the tribe Levi.
First, I'm sure the writer actually meant to say "transliteration >from the
YIDDISH." Although Yiddish is written in Hebrew letters, it is NOT by any
means the same thing as Hebrew. In this case, the surname WEINTRAUB
comes >from a standard German word: "Weintraube", meaning "bunch of
grapes" (which is obviously the usual way of describing what the Hebrew
blessing over wine poetically calls "fruit of the vine").

Second, even though the name WEINTRAUB means "bunch of grapes" rather than
"grape stompers" (i.e. those who tread grapes to make wine), I really
don't think the epithet "grape-stompers" can be interpreted as an
anti-semitic slur. Let's face it, grape-treading WAS the traditional
method before machinery -- and it's still done in a lot of places, though
mostly not by Jews these days (except that one of my sons did once get to
join in a grape-treading festival, somewhere in France I think it was.

Third, even the Hebrew Bible -- not surprisingly, given its provenance in
a Mediterranean land -- refers to grape-treaders! At most, there might be
some "classism" involved in the use of this epithet by the relatives of
the above poster -- naturally "grape-stompers" would imply peasants as
opposed to middle- or upperclass people. But frankly, it sounds more like
a relatively benign family joke rather than anything sinister -- I've
heard far worse epithets used in my own family!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meaning of name WEINTRAUB #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: Weintraub"fruit of the vine" or "grape stompers"?
.The Askenazi side of the clan uses "fruit of
the vine"as the meaning for Weintraub.The Sephardic side of the clan
uses "grape stompers".I find it an anti-semetic gesture by the Sephardic
Weintraub's to refer to us as "grape stompers".Are there Sephardic
Weintraub's that refer to themselves as "fruit of the vine"? As far as I
can find out Weintraub is a transliteration >from the Hebrew and makes
all Weintraub's direct desendants of the tribe Levi.
First, I'm sure the writer actually meant to say "transliteration >from the
YIDDISH." Although Yiddish is written in Hebrew letters, it is NOT by any
means the same thing as Hebrew. In this case, the surname WEINTRAUB
comes >from a standard German word: "Weintraube", meaning "bunch of
grapes" (which is obviously the usual way of describing what the Hebrew
blessing over wine poetically calls "fruit of the vine").

Second, even though the name WEINTRAUB means "bunch of grapes" rather than
"grape stompers" (i.e. those who tread grapes to make wine), I really
don't think the epithet "grape-stompers" can be interpreted as an
anti-semitic slur. Let's face it, grape-treading WAS the traditional
method before machinery -- and it's still done in a lot of places, though
mostly not by Jews these days (except that one of my sons did once get to
join in a grape-treading festival, somewhere in France I think it was.

Third, even the Hebrew Bible -- not surprisingly, given its provenance in
a Mediterranean land -- refers to grape-treaders! At most, there might be
some "classism" involved in the use of this epithet by the relatives of
the above poster -- naturally "grape-stompers" would imply peasants as
opposed to middle- or upperclass people. But frankly, it sounds more like
a relatively benign family joke rather than anything sinister -- I've
heard far worse epithets used in my own family!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


A Time To Be Born: Customs and Folklore of Jewish Birth #general

vctinney@...
 

The Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia, 1998, has
released the book concerning "A Time To Be Born". It is
not listed or filed in the genealogy section of our
University Library. However, the Introduction states:
"We can still learn by looking back at the Jewish customs,
legends, and memories central to their world, however,
because just as the leaves shed by a tree nourish germinating
seeds in the earth below, so too, the customs of previous
generations form the bed of tradition that nurtures new ways
of viewing our Jewish heritage."

The focus of the book "is on the beliefs, attitudes, and
customs of Jews when bearing children". The author,
Michele Klein, uses as her sources, "First and foremost,
the Bible, the Talmud, the later Codes of Jewish Law,
and the huge body of rabbinic commentaries and responsa set
down Jewish laws and recorded traditions concerning conception,
pregnancy, birth, and the postnatal period."

Mention is made on page 200 that "it was important to know
a person's parentage, and this became a reason for keeping
birth records."

This book seems to me to closely follow the spirit of Elijah,
[Malachi 4:5-6] and will help all Jewish genealogists to
turn their friends hearts to search after their Jewish ancestry;
even the hearts of the parents to their children and the
children to their fathers and mothers, grandparents, etc.

Respectfully yours,

Tom Tinney Sr.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Time To Be Born: Customs and Folklore of Jewish Birth #general

vctinney@...
 

The Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia, 1998, has
released the book concerning "A Time To Be Born". It is
not listed or filed in the genealogy section of our
University Library. However, the Introduction states:
"We can still learn by looking back at the Jewish customs,
legends, and memories central to their world, however,
because just as the leaves shed by a tree nourish germinating
seeds in the earth below, so too, the customs of previous
generations form the bed of tradition that nurtures new ways
of viewing our Jewish heritage."

The focus of the book "is on the beliefs, attitudes, and
customs of Jews when bearing children". The author,
Michele Klein, uses as her sources, "First and foremost,
the Bible, the Talmud, the later Codes of Jewish Law,
and the huge body of rabbinic commentaries and responsa set
down Jewish laws and recorded traditions concerning conception,
pregnancy, birth, and the postnatal period."

Mention is made on page 200 that "it was important to know
a person's parentage, and this became a reason for keeping
birth records."

This book seems to me to closely follow the spirit of Elijah,
[Malachi 4:5-6] and will help all Jewish genealogists to
turn their friends hearts to search after their Jewish ancestry;
even the hearts of the parents to their children and the
children to their fathers and mothers, grandparents, etc.

Respectfully yours,

Tom Tinney Sr.


Re: Chita again #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

Ever since 98/09/01, when I responded at length to Gayle
Riley's inquiry about Chita and whether there was a Jewish
Community there, lurking in the darkest recesses of my mind
has been the idea that somehow I had indeed seen mention of
a Jewish Community there. I even had a blurry image of the
passage I'd seen this mention, but I didn't find out just
where this passage was until today when I had occasion to
re-read the memoir of Gregor Zvi BELKOWSKY, who was an ardent
Russian Zionist and my grandfather Isidor BELKOWSKY's
first cousin.

In this memoir Gregor, who was a prolific writer on many
subjects, says that in 1905 he wrote a study named "The Russian
Legislation of the Jews in Siberia" at the "special request of
some Siberian Jewry Representatives, Y. Shlezinger, A. Rif, and
Chaim Soloveichik >from the town of Chita."

Unfortunately he doesn't say any more about these
representatives or about Chita.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
98/12/31


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chita again #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

Ever since 98/09/01, when I responded at length to Gayle
Riley's inquiry about Chita and whether there was a Jewish
Community there, lurking in the darkest recesses of my mind
has been the idea that somehow I had indeed seen mention of
a Jewish Community there. I even had a blurry image of the
passage I'd seen this mention, but I didn't find out just
where this passage was until today when I had occasion to
re-read the memoir of Gregor Zvi BELKOWSKY, who was an ardent
Russian Zionist and my grandfather Isidor BELKOWSKY's
first cousin.

In this memoir Gregor, who was a prolific writer on many
subjects, says that in 1905 he wrote a study named "The Russian
Legislation of the Jews in Siberia" at the "special request of
some Siberian Jewry Representatives, Y. Shlezinger, A. Rif, and
Chaim Soloveichik >from the town of Chita."

Unfortunately he doesn't say any more about these
representatives or about Chita.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
98/12/31