Date   

Re Joshua Falk #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

On the name "Joshua Falk" and the connection between Joshua and "falcon, "
I would say as follows: The root b-z-z -- in both Hebrew and Arabic --
means to"snatch" or "seize" (hence, to "plunder" or "despoil"). This is
exactly what a predatory bird like a falcon does. Moreover, the Arabic for
falcon is"ba'z" with a long "a" vowel. So the Hebrew"baz" for falcon,
though not found as such in the Bible, is an authentic semitic name for
this bird. However, I have yet to figure out how the SAME FORM of the
word that means "prey" also came to connote the "predator" -- which is
just the opposite, therefore requiring a different FORM! On general
prnciples of Hebrew language and grammar, one would expect to find
something like "bozez" rather than "baz" for the predator or falcon.
However, the etymological connection is obviously there somehow.

Michael Bernet ingeniously discovered in Num. 14:30-31 a fairly close (but
by no means immediate) juxtaposition of the Hebrew word baz (in its
normal sense of prey) with a reference to Joshua. But normally, when a
biblical name is associated with an animal, the two are IMMEDIATELY
juxtaposed -- like Naftali Tzvi ("Naftali is a deer") in Gen. 49:21, or
"Binyamin Ze'e {"Benjamin is a wolf") in Gen. 49:27. So, I agree with
Micheel Bernet, who urged caution, that we need to be circumspect about the
notion of Yehoshua....Baz (Joshua is a Falcon). Possibly there is some
midrash on Num. 14:3031that connects the two words even though they are
not connected in any obviously meaningful way.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re Joshua Falk #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

On the name "Joshua Falk" and the connection between Joshua and "falcon, "
I would say as follows: The root b-z-z -- in both Hebrew and Arabic --
means to"snatch" or "seize" (hence, to "plunder" or "despoil"). This is
exactly what a predatory bird like a falcon does. Moreover, the Arabic for
falcon is"ba'z" with a long "a" vowel. So the Hebrew"baz" for falcon,
though not found as such in the Bible, is an authentic semitic name for
this bird. However, I have yet to figure out how the SAME FORM of the
word that means "prey" also came to connote the "predator" -- which is
just the opposite, therefore requiring a different FORM! On general
prnciples of Hebrew language and grammar, one would expect to find
something like "bozez" rather than "baz" for the predator or falcon.
However, the etymological connection is obviously there somehow.

Michael Bernet ingeniously discovered in Num. 14:30-31 a fairly close (but
by no means immediate) juxtaposition of the Hebrew word baz (in its
normal sense of prey) with a reference to Joshua. But normally, when a
biblical name is associated with an animal, the two are IMMEDIATELY
juxtaposed -- like Naftali Tzvi ("Naftali is a deer") in Gen. 49:21, or
"Binyamin Ze'e {"Benjamin is a wolf") in Gen. 49:27. So, I agree with
Micheel Bernet, who urged caution, that we need to be circumspect about the
notion of Yehoshua....Baz (Joshua is a Falcon). Possibly there is some
midrash on Num. 14:3031that connects the two words even though they are
not connected in any obviously meaningful way.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Jewish Police Officers in US #general

TedBelmont@...
 

As Jonina Duker suggested, the fraternal police societies are called
Shomrim. It seems that there are numerous local societies, not one national
one.

My information comes form an excellent article on this subject by Elaine
Cossrow Kolinsky in the Autumn 1994 edition of Chronicles (journal of the
JGS of Philadelphia). The article lists 28 Shomrim socieites and gives
source references. There have been updates in subsequent editions of
Chronicles.

Back issues of Chronicles are available >from Leonard Markowitz whose e-mail
address is <Priluki@voicenet.com>

Ted Belmont
Leeds, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Police Officers in US #general

TedBelmont@...
 

As Jonina Duker suggested, the fraternal police societies are called
Shomrim. It seems that there are numerous local societies, not one national
one.

My information comes form an excellent article on this subject by Elaine
Cossrow Kolinsky in the Autumn 1994 edition of Chronicles (journal of the
JGS of Philadelphia). The article lists 28 Shomrim socieites and gives
source references. There have been updates in subsequent editions of
Chronicles.

Back issues of Chronicles are available >from Leonard Markowitz whose e-mail
address is <Priluki@voicenet.com>

Ted Belmont
Leeds, England


Chicago mystery - Waldheim cemetery - reinterment ? #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I am in London UK .
Some puzzling questions arise out of the inspection of a headstone by a
net - friend .
The cemetery is Waldheim Chicago Section OBA
a .The SSDI gives death date 24 Aug 1919 but the headstone says 22 Mar
1922.all the graves nearby are c 1922 .
b. The birthdate on the stone and the age recorded in the Waldheim office
would tend to confirm the 1919 date.
c. The Burial Soc on the stone is Order of Brith Abraham - do records
survive ?

Can anyone throw some light here ?

MODERATOR NOTE: Our curiosity has been aroused. Why does a death in 1919,
or even in 1922, show up in the SSDI when Social Security didn't even exist
at the time?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Chicago mystery - Waldheim cemetery - reinterment ? #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I am in London UK .
Some puzzling questions arise out of the inspection of a headstone by a
net - friend .
The cemetery is Waldheim Chicago Section OBA
a .The SSDI gives death date 24 Aug 1919 but the headstone says 22 Mar
1922.all the graves nearby are c 1922 .
b. The birthdate on the stone and the age recorded in the Waldheim office
would tend to confirm the 1919 date.
c. The Burial Soc on the stone is Order of Brith Abraham - do records
survive ?

Can anyone throw some light here ?

MODERATOR NOTE: Our curiosity has been aroused. Why does a death in 1919,
or even in 1922, show up in the SSDI when Social Security didn't even exist
at the time?


Jewish House of Worship #general

mildred lester <sim-fie@...>
 

To all that sent information thru this site and thru seperate E-Mail,
"Thank you".
You have all cleared up the info. I am recieving on my Family.
Mildred Loffmin Lester

Researching:
LESTER,LOFFMIN,BULL,BRASH,POTTS,
COLLMAN,WATERMAN,GELB,COHEN HIGGENBOTHAM,SCHWARTZ,WHITE,
MCMULLEN,WOLLENBERG,GUSOWSKI


Re: Farmers #general

Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

Several years ago there was an article in 'Timeline', publication of the
Ohio Hiustorical Society, on Jewish farmers in OH. I don't have a
reference but their web page is www.ohiohistory.org. The journal editor is
Chris Duckworth.
--
Al Rosenfield
Columbus OH
e-mail <arosen@gcfn.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish House of Worship #general

mildred lester <sim-fie@...>
 

To all that sent information thru this site and thru seperate E-Mail,
"Thank you".
You have all cleared up the info. I am recieving on my Family.
Mildred Loffmin Lester

Researching:
LESTER,LOFFMIN,BULL,BRASH,POTTS,
COLLMAN,WATERMAN,GELB,COHEN HIGGENBOTHAM,SCHWARTZ,WHITE,
MCMULLEN,WOLLENBERG,GUSOWSKI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Farmers #general

Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

Several years ago there was an article in 'Timeline', publication of the
Ohio Hiustorical Society, on Jewish farmers in OH. I don't have a
reference but their web page is www.ohiohistory.org. The journal editor is
Chris Duckworth.
--
Al Rosenfield
Columbus OH
e-mail <arosen@gcfn.org>


Which town is Sebezh (Sebesh) #general

Morton and Esther Cohen <cohenme@...>
 

In his Avotaynu article on Chabad Lubavitch Literature as Genealogical
Sources, Michael Ronn refers to the "Lubavitcher Rebbe's Memoirs" as
providing a list of towns with Chabad communities. Among them is Sebezh
(Sebesh).

Thinking that there may be a family connection I tried to locate Sebezh
and/or Sebesh using the JewishGen Shtetl Finder. Using a D-M search
neither name showed up. Interestingly, among the 26 names that did come up
were Suboch and Subocz which are shown to be variant names Subacius.
Subacius itself does not come up under this DM search code number.

While I would like to assume that Sebezh is actually Subacius, the presence
of all those other possibilities leads me to ask if someone could
knowledgeably say explicitly what or where Sebezh (Sebesh) actually is.

Morton Cohen
Rochester NY
Researching Rabin/Rabinowitz/Reback - Subacius?
Rosenkovics - Anycscai
Morton & Esther Cohen
Rochester NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Which town is Sebezh (Sebesh) #general

Morton and Esther Cohen <cohenme@...>
 

In his Avotaynu article on Chabad Lubavitch Literature as Genealogical
Sources, Michael Ronn refers to the "Lubavitcher Rebbe's Memoirs" as
providing a list of towns with Chabad communities. Among them is Sebezh
(Sebesh).

Thinking that there may be a family connection I tried to locate Sebezh
and/or Sebesh using the JewishGen Shtetl Finder. Using a D-M search
neither name showed up. Interestingly, among the 26 names that did come up
were Suboch and Subocz which are shown to be variant names Subacius.
Subacius itself does not come up under this DM search code number.

While I would like to assume that Sebezh is actually Subacius, the presence
of all those other possibilities leads me to ask if someone could
knowledgeably say explicitly what or where Sebezh (Sebesh) actually is.

Morton Cohen
Rochester NY
Researching Rabin/Rabinowitz/Reback - Subacius?
Rosenkovics - Anycscai
Morton & Esther Cohen
Rochester NY


Transliteration: "Chasid vs. Hasid" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

GojuMom@aol.com wrote:

I just spoke with my Great Aunt (born 1915 in Zhivotov, Tarastcha
District, (Kiev Guberniya) and was told her father belonged to a
particular religious sect, know as CHasid. She made particular
emphasis on the pronounciation of the CH like in cha-cha and made sure
to differentiate form the term HAsid.
This comment unwittingly raised an important point about transliteration of
Hebrew gutturals, which matters a great deal in Jewish genealogy. So
here's an explanation of the problem.

When we speak of Chasidim or Hasidim today, we invariably mean the modern
sect of Hasidism that was founded in the mid-18th century (not the
completely unrelated ancient sect of "Hasidim" of BCE times, sometimes
encountered in textbooks on Jewish history). So today's debate is simply
about choosing between two different transliterations -- one popular but
incorrect and one scholarly and correct. The more correct form is
Hasidim, which I wholeheartedly recommend to JGenners and everyone else.
The popular use of "CH" to transliterate BOTH the Hebrew letter Het AND
the Hebrew letter Khaf is VERY unfortunate, because it confuses two
DIFFERENT Hebrew alphabet letters, thereby bumsteering many readers as to
the correct Hebrew spelling of the name or word being transliterated.
That's why it's important to Jewishgenners!

The two letters Het and Khaf originally had different pronunciations (and
still do among Jews who speak native Arabic -- which has the same two
letters and has always correctly distinguished their pronunciation). But
in Hebrew transliteration, CH has been used indiscriminately for both for
at least two centuries; that's because CH represents the well-known German
and Yiddish guttural sound, as in the name Bach. I think CH should
ideally be reserved solely for Yiddish words, or for Hebrew names spelled
in Yiddish transliteration (e.g. Chaim, which is really Hayyim, as it is
spelled with a Het in Hebrew). But, alas! to make matters worse, modern
scholarly study of Yiddish has recently abandoned CH in favor of KH -- but
confusingly has decided to use KH ndiscriminately when transliterating
Hebrew names or words regardless of whether they are spelled with Het or
Khaf in the original Hebrew.

Modern scholars of Hebrew and other semitic languages routinely distinguish
HET (underdotted H) >from KHAF (KH). They also distinguish the HET from
the normal H (the letter Heh) by using the underdot for the Het. In the
word Hanukkah, for instance, the first H should be underdotted (sorry,
can't do this on e-mail!) while the second H, representing a heh, is not.
(Note that Hallmark cards spell Hanukkah correctly -- except that they
don't bother with the underdot, more's the pity.)

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: We have allowed this post because the spelling of names in
the original Hebrew or Yiddish may indeed be relevant in genealogical
research. Extensive discussion of transliteration is, however, offtopic.
We welcome for posting responses that focus on the genealogical aspects of
this message. Please direct all other communications in response to this
message privately to Dr Wegner.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Transliteration: "Chasid vs. Hasid" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

GojuMom@aol.com wrote:

I just spoke with my Great Aunt (born 1915 in Zhivotov, Tarastcha
District, (Kiev Guberniya) and was told her father belonged to a
particular religious sect, know as CHasid. She made particular
emphasis on the pronounciation of the CH like in cha-cha and made sure
to differentiate form the term HAsid.
This comment unwittingly raised an important point about transliteration of
Hebrew gutturals, which matters a great deal in Jewish genealogy. So
here's an explanation of the problem.

When we speak of Chasidim or Hasidim today, we invariably mean the modern
sect of Hasidism that was founded in the mid-18th century (not the
completely unrelated ancient sect of "Hasidim" of BCE times, sometimes
encountered in textbooks on Jewish history). So today's debate is simply
about choosing between two different transliterations -- one popular but
incorrect and one scholarly and correct. The more correct form is
Hasidim, which I wholeheartedly recommend to JGenners and everyone else.
The popular use of "CH" to transliterate BOTH the Hebrew letter Het AND
the Hebrew letter Khaf is VERY unfortunate, because it confuses two
DIFFERENT Hebrew alphabet letters, thereby bumsteering many readers as to
the correct Hebrew spelling of the name or word being transliterated.
That's why it's important to Jewishgenners!

The two letters Het and Khaf originally had different pronunciations (and
still do among Jews who speak native Arabic -- which has the same two
letters and has always correctly distinguished their pronunciation). But
in Hebrew transliteration, CH has been used indiscriminately for both for
at least two centuries; that's because CH represents the well-known German
and Yiddish guttural sound, as in the name Bach. I think CH should
ideally be reserved solely for Yiddish words, or for Hebrew names spelled
in Yiddish transliteration (e.g. Chaim, which is really Hayyim, as it is
spelled with a Het in Hebrew). But, alas! to make matters worse, modern
scholarly study of Yiddish has recently abandoned CH in favor of KH -- but
confusingly has decided to use KH ndiscriminately when transliterating
Hebrew names or words regardless of whether they are spelled with Het or
Khaf in the original Hebrew.

Modern scholars of Hebrew and other semitic languages routinely distinguish
HET (underdotted H) >from KHAF (KH). They also distinguish the HET from
the normal H (the letter Heh) by using the underdot for the Het. In the
word Hanukkah, for instance, the first H should be underdotted (sorry,
can't do this on e-mail!) while the second H, representing a heh, is not.
(Note that Hallmark cards spell Hanukkah correctly -- except that they
don't bother with the underdot, more's the pity.)

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: We have allowed this post because the spelling of names in
the original Hebrew or Yiddish may indeed be relevant in genealogical
research. Extensive discussion of transliteration is, however, offtopic.
We welcome for posting responses that focus on the genealogical aspects of
this message. Please direct all other communications in response to this
message privately to Dr Wegner.


Re: Marriage at 12 years old #general

Kenneth Weiss <kweiss@...>
 

On 28 Dec 1998 15:47:35 -0800, marksg@lori.state.ri.us (Mark Sweberg)
wrote:

I just found out >from a cousin that my great grandmother got married at
the age of 12 in Iasi, Romania around 1880. Were such young marriages
commonplace back then? What would be some of the reasons for such an
early marriage? Would avoidance of military conscription be a possible
reason? Any of your thoughts would be appreciated.
Just off the cuff, I'd say that one of the main reasons for such an
early age marriage would be the fact that life expectancy at that time
was considerably less than it is now. My Romanian grandparents were
17 (him) and 16 (her) when they married.
--
Ken Weiss < mailto:kweiss@i-2000.com >
URL: http://www.i2.i-2000.com/~kweiss/Kens.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Marriage at 12 years old #general

Kenneth Weiss <kweiss@...>
 

On 28 Dec 1998 15:47:35 -0800, marksg@lori.state.ri.us (Mark Sweberg)
wrote:

I just found out >from a cousin that my great grandmother got married at
the age of 12 in Iasi, Romania around 1880. Were such young marriages
commonplace back then? What would be some of the reasons for such an
early marriage? Would avoidance of military conscription be a possible
reason? Any of your thoughts would be appreciated.
Just off the cuff, I'd say that one of the main reasons for such an
early age marriage would be the fact that life expectancy at that time
was considerably less than it is now. My Romanian grandparents were
17 (him) and 16 (her) when they married.
--
Ken Weiss < mailto:kweiss@i-2000.com >
URL: http://www.i2.i-2000.com/~kweiss/Kens.html


I'm Lost...Again #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

Hi All,

I guess that even with online maps, I still get lost >from time to time.
So, I'm asking for some help for this geographically challenged
researcher.

Abraham RENDELSTEIN married Amalia PYCRENIK about 1899, but I'm not sure
where. However they had four children that I know of:

Mordko Vel Max RENDELSTEIN who married Josefine SIEGMANN
Reisel Vel Rapr RENDELSTEIN who married Josef KLANG
Pepa RENDELSTEIN who married Alfred LEIMANN (LEHMANN)
Fani RENDELSTEIN who married Josef SINGER

(all of these four marriages took place in Vienna, Austria 1919 thru
1932)

Mordko, Reisel and Pepa were born at Kaplince, Brezezany, Galicia
Fani was born at Kaplinow, Poland

Mordko immigrated to Uraguay and then to Argentina (when he couldn't get
papers to get into the USA)

Pepa and Fani (and their husbands) DID get to America, and they settled
in Los Angeles County, CA (as far as I know)

Reisel and Josef? Well, I just don't know.

I know that basically all of the RENDELSTEIN families came from
Tarnopol, Dunayev, Zborov, and Kozova -- all in the same basic area ESE
of L'vov/Lemberg. Is Kaplince in that area too? If not, just where is
it? And what about Kaplinow?

Any and all help will be appreciated. Mapquest maps only got me more
confused.

Thanks,
Ricki Randall Zunk
Miami, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen I'm Lost...Again #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

Hi All,

I guess that even with online maps, I still get lost >from time to time.
So, I'm asking for some help for this geographically challenged
researcher.

Abraham RENDELSTEIN married Amalia PYCRENIK about 1899, but I'm not sure
where. However they had four children that I know of:

Mordko Vel Max RENDELSTEIN who married Josefine SIEGMANN
Reisel Vel Rapr RENDELSTEIN who married Josef KLANG
Pepa RENDELSTEIN who married Alfred LEIMANN (LEHMANN)
Fani RENDELSTEIN who married Josef SINGER

(all of these four marriages took place in Vienna, Austria 1919 thru
1932)

Mordko, Reisel and Pepa were born at Kaplince, Brezezany, Galicia
Fani was born at Kaplinow, Poland

Mordko immigrated to Uraguay and then to Argentina (when he couldn't get
papers to get into the USA)

Pepa and Fani (and their husbands) DID get to America, and they settled
in Los Angeles County, CA (as far as I know)

Reisel and Josef? Well, I just don't know.

I know that basically all of the RENDELSTEIN families came from
Tarnopol, Dunayev, Zborov, and Kozova -- all in the same basic area ESE
of L'vov/Lemberg. Is Kaplince in that area too? If not, just where is
it? And what about Kaplinow?

Any and all help will be appreciated. Mapquest maps only got me more
confused.

Thanks,
Ricki Randall Zunk
Miami, FL


Re: The Given Name Ehashia (Ishue) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-12-29 04:00:57 EST, ken@wasatch.com writes:

<< Does anyone know the etymology of the given name Ehashia (Ishue)?

==You didn't say what country and what language. My internal soundex
suggests Isaiah (Heb. Yeshayahu). Is that a possibility?

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Given Name Ehashia (Ishue) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-12-29 04:00:57 EST, ken@wasatch.com writes:

<< Does anyone know the etymology of the given name Ehashia (Ishue)?

==You didn't say what country and what language. My internal soundex
suggests Isaiah (Heb. Yeshayahu). Is that a possibility?

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam