Date   

PART III Travels in LITHUANIA and LATVIA with ALEKSANDR FEIGMANIS #general

Carol Lieberman <cmenetwork@...>
 

In Libau, we went to the Jewish cemetery.

We walked into the Cantorial, the cemetery office where Sandris and his mother
were sitting. I couldn't help but think what a strange, old-feeling, musty
place it was. Aleksandr greeted them in Russian. The two ladies and I said
hello. Then Alex asked about the names that the ladies were looking for. I
asked if he had a B list, and he pulled out an old and crumbling book, Alex
telling me it dated to the cemetery opening.

He opened the book to BERNHARDT and there were about 8 pages. Even though they
were written in German (Russian speaking Latvian people in a German cemetery),
they were in beautiful handwriting and I could read all. I quickly saw there
were a few Bernhardts -- Rossa and Julian, to name those I could recall. As I
did not know the name of my ggf's first wife, I thought perhaps it might be
Rossa. Sandris shook his head and said to Alex -- very difficult to find the
old graves. I probably can't. He said he would try. In order to do that, he
had to research a second set of books that gave directions to where a grave
was located. When this book was opened, it appeared that the B list was
considerably longer. As we both looked at the pages, I suddenly found YETTA
BERNHARDT staring me in the face. The Hebrew year next to it indicated 1887,
the year my ggm died. Yetta could certainly be translated to Ethel. I felt
faint -- but then you cannot imagine the sticky heat there.

With directions in hand for all of us, we left the Cantorial. Striding into
the cemetery, one could not help noticing the beautifully kept graves of
modern times, planted with flowers and plants of all descriptions. They were
on the right. On the left were other graves, not totally ignored, but covered
with weeds that were two to three feet high. We followed him through many rows
of these weeds, and I kept hoping that nothing sinister would bite me on the
leg. Actually I received not even one bug bite in any cemetery. It was the
Metropole Hotel that would do me in!

Sandris stopped and started counting plots. Finally he said, 'There it is.'
'Where?' I asked Alex. Alex strode over to the spot, ripped up a handful of
ivy-looking weeds, scooped up the turf, and there underneath was the stone! It
was dirt covered, but it was easy for him to read the word in (Hebrew?
Yiddish? German?) I couldn't really read it. But Alex did as well as the date.
So it was Yetta Bernhardt and was she my Yetta? Who knows? I believe so and I
have chosen to adopt her as mine.

Sandris, for a small fee, will restore the stone, take pictures and send them
to me. Also, he will copy the entire Bernhardt list for me so I can see if
there is also a place for my ggf's first wife who died earlier. I don't think
it is in Liepaja. But that's a story for the next day.

We next visited the Liepaja Jewish Community Center. What a dismal place. A
three-room cement walled and floored establishment, with one room as a place
of worship
and the other with card tables and chairs and oil cloth covers for the tables.
There were pictures and memories on the walls, but it was a dark and
non-memorable spot. How I wished I could do something for the people who
remained there. Possibly 60 young Jewish people and maybe a total of 300 in
the community. My thoughts there and in other cities were that we give so much
money to Israel, why not to the forgotten Jews of Latvia and Lithuania?

Soon after, I purchased a book with photos of the beautiful buildings in
Liepaja. You cannot believe the low cost of everything there, and we took off
down the road again towards Memel. It was already nearly 4 PM and we had the
experience of the border to cross.

There is nothing more interesting than crossing a border where one speaks
neither language. Other than their silence to me, their intense exploration of
luggage and papers, it was uneventful. Between the Latvian and Lithuanian
sides, we took up one hour of time, then racing ahead to beat the impending
dusk. We finally reached Palanga, the first town in Lithuania on the coast,
formerly the last town in Courland.

The significance of this to me is that opposite the beaches of Palanga are the
beaches of the Courland Spit. Was this the Courland my grandmother spoke of?
If she were >from Gargzdai, the closest Courland water to her would have been
Palanga, 9 KM >from Memel, and another 16 >from Gargzdai. As both cities were on
a direct route >from Konigsberg (Alex had found a Behr Bernhardt in the
Konigsberg directory of 1865) and both Memel and Gargdai had many Jewish
schools and scholars, I felt sure I was on to something.

More tomorrow.


Tul'chin #general

Barbara Jean <midmrtg@...>
 

Thank you to all the people who have been so kind to respond. I
appreciate so much the suggestions of where I might find more
information for the town of Tul'chin which appears >from your replies to
be the correct town. I will probably have more questions as I go along.
I guess it gets a little easier as you get more experienced but for a
novice it all seems such a mysterious maze. I have been reading all the
messages for awhile (It took awhile to get up courage to pose my
question) and I am in awe of the knowledge so many of you posses. Thank
you again.
Barbara Jean Warner (Dansky)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PART III Travels in LITHUANIA and LATVIA with ALEKSANDR FEIGMANIS #general

Carol Lieberman <cmenetwork@...>
 

In Libau, we went to the Jewish cemetery.

We walked into the Cantorial, the cemetery office where Sandris and his mother
were sitting. I couldn't help but think what a strange, old-feeling, musty
place it was. Aleksandr greeted them in Russian. The two ladies and I said
hello. Then Alex asked about the names that the ladies were looking for. I
asked if he had a B list, and he pulled out an old and crumbling book, Alex
telling me it dated to the cemetery opening.

He opened the book to BERNHARDT and there were about 8 pages. Even though they
were written in German (Russian speaking Latvian people in a German cemetery),
they were in beautiful handwriting and I could read all. I quickly saw there
were a few Bernhardts -- Rossa and Julian, to name those I could recall. As I
did not know the name of my ggf's first wife, I thought perhaps it might be
Rossa. Sandris shook his head and said to Alex -- very difficult to find the
old graves. I probably can't. He said he would try. In order to do that, he
had to research a second set of books that gave directions to where a grave
was located. When this book was opened, it appeared that the B list was
considerably longer. As we both looked at the pages, I suddenly found YETTA
BERNHARDT staring me in the face. The Hebrew year next to it indicated 1887,
the year my ggm died. Yetta could certainly be translated to Ethel. I felt
faint -- but then you cannot imagine the sticky heat there.

With directions in hand for all of us, we left the Cantorial. Striding into
the cemetery, one could not help noticing the beautifully kept graves of
modern times, planted with flowers and plants of all descriptions. They were
on the right. On the left were other graves, not totally ignored, but covered
with weeds that were two to three feet high. We followed him through many rows
of these weeds, and I kept hoping that nothing sinister would bite me on the
leg. Actually I received not even one bug bite in any cemetery. It was the
Metropole Hotel that would do me in!

Sandris stopped and started counting plots. Finally he said, 'There it is.'
'Where?' I asked Alex. Alex strode over to the spot, ripped up a handful of
ivy-looking weeds, scooped up the turf, and there underneath was the stone! It
was dirt covered, but it was easy for him to read the word in (Hebrew?
Yiddish? German?) I couldn't really read it. But Alex did as well as the date.
So it was Yetta Bernhardt and was she my Yetta? Who knows? I believe so and I
have chosen to adopt her as mine.

Sandris, for a small fee, will restore the stone, take pictures and send them
to me. Also, he will copy the entire Bernhardt list for me so I can see if
there is also a place for my ggf's first wife who died earlier. I don't think
it is in Liepaja. But that's a story for the next day.

We next visited the Liepaja Jewish Community Center. What a dismal place. A
three-room cement walled and floored establishment, with one room as a place
of worship
and the other with card tables and chairs and oil cloth covers for the tables.
There were pictures and memories on the walls, but it was a dark and
non-memorable spot. How I wished I could do something for the people who
remained there. Possibly 60 young Jewish people and maybe a total of 300 in
the community. My thoughts there and in other cities were that we give so much
money to Israel, why not to the forgotten Jews of Latvia and Lithuania?

Soon after, I purchased a book with photos of the beautiful buildings in
Liepaja. You cannot believe the low cost of everything there, and we took off
down the road again towards Memel. It was already nearly 4 PM and we had the
experience of the border to cross.

There is nothing more interesting than crossing a border where one speaks
neither language. Other than their silence to me, their intense exploration of
luggage and papers, it was uneventful. Between the Latvian and Lithuanian
sides, we took up one hour of time, then racing ahead to beat the impending
dusk. We finally reached Palanga, the first town in Lithuania on the coast,
formerly the last town in Courland.

The significance of this to me is that opposite the beaches of Palanga are the
beaches of the Courland Spit. Was this the Courland my grandmother spoke of?
If she were >from Gargzdai, the closest Courland water to her would have been
Palanga, 9 KM >from Memel, and another 16 >from Gargzdai. As both cities were on
a direct route >from Konigsberg (Alex had found a Behr Bernhardt in the
Konigsberg directory of 1865) and both Memel and Gargdai had many Jewish
schools and scholars, I felt sure I was on to something.

More tomorrow.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tul'chin #general

Barbara Jean <midmrtg@...>
 

Thank you to all the people who have been so kind to respond. I
appreciate so much the suggestions of where I might find more
information for the town of Tul'chin which appears >from your replies to
be the correct town. I will probably have more questions as I go along.
I guess it gets a little easier as you get more experienced but for a
novice it all seems such a mysterious maze. I have been reading all the
messages for awhile (It took awhile to get up courage to pose my
question) and I am in awe of the knowledge so many of you posses. Thank
you again.
Barbara Jean Warner (Dansky)


Slutsk, Minsk gubernia, revision list 1816-1818 #general

Vcharny@...
 

Below is surname list I compiled and transliterated >from Russian.
The source is revision list of 1816 (second part -- additional revision
of 1818 - I hope to compile soon). It is available on LDS microfilm
#2010468. After more close work with records some corrections
could be made.

Differ >from many other towns Jewish records of that time I read,
Slutsk show greatest diversity of surnames. Just small part is repeated.
It means high probability in determination of ancestor family just by surname.

Adrov, Aiker?, Aizenberg, Aizentson, Altanin?, Altman
Altshul, Apel'tsyn, Arpush, Atkenaz, Azyor?, Badkhan
Bagamol, Baikov, Barakon, Bariks?, Barshay?, Basin
Baslavsky, Beiles, Beinvol, Belov?, Bely, Ber..nin
Bereznik, Berman, Bezruchin, Birger, Blank, Blokh
Bludny, Blyand, Bobekein, Bogushev, Bol'shtein, Bomeil'
Bomshtein, Bondarov, Bord, Boretsky, Borisovsky, Braver
Bresky, Broda, Brodsky, Bronshtein, Brosd?, Bulkov?
Bunimov, Bunin, Byaly, Chapran, Charny, Chinkov
Chipchin, Dalginov, Dalkov?, Del'bukh, Derechin, Dervin
Diment, Dobromisli, Dolgov, Dubel'tin, Dubovsky, Dubrov
Dubrovets, Dultsis, Dushkov, Ebin, Efronov, Efrost
Eigenburg, Elingmos?, Elkonovich, El'lin, Emanuel', Enishbliz?
Epshtein, Eraev, Fainshtein, Faivusyev, Farber, Fialkov
Finkel', Finkel'shtein, Fisher, Freinkel', Fridlyand, Ful'makht
Gabar?, Galkin, Galnes, Gal'pern, Garmiza, Gedansky
Gefter, Geiman, Gel'barg, Gel'but, Gel'fand, Genda?
German, Gikhan, Gildener, Gil'zer, Gintsberg, Ginzberg
Girshin, Girshov, Gisin, Giter, Gites, Gleiter
Gleter, Glozman, Glum, Gokhdarf, Gokhmark, Gol'berg
Goldbam, Goldberg, Goldgand?, Goler, Golub, Gopin
Gor, Gorodets, Gorokhov, Graes?, Granat, Granov
Grebenechnik, Grinberg, Grinshtein, Grobshtein, Gubar', Gurovits
Guspin, Gutenmakher, Guttsait, Imerman, Indik, Ispanin
Ivansky, Ivan'sky, Izin, Kagna, Kantina, Kantorovich
Kapelyahih, Kaplan, Karman, Karmin, Kasber, Katsenel'son
Khagiz, Kharat, Kharik, Kharosh, Khaskin, Kheifets
Khibnin, Khmarny, Khorosh, Kibalkin, Kinor, Klavich
Klavner, Kleshchik, Klotsvach, Knigos?, Knigov, Kopcher?
Kopulensky, Kosovsky, Kotner, Kototvich, Kovin, Kozanin
Kozlin, Kozlirapik?, Krachak, Krachan, Kraft, Krainy
Krakov, Kramen, Kramin, Kraskov, Krasnov, Kreines
Kretskov, Krivodel, Krupnik, Kugel', Kuicher, Kunaev
Kurkov, Kurlyand, Kushka, Kusmin, Landa, Lansky
Lapidus, Latsenberg, Leshkovich, Levikalov, Levitan, Liberman
Libes, Lifshits, Likhter, Liles, Lilin, Lipmanov
Lipshin, Livov, Lotnik, Lubinshtein, Lubshtein, Lulin
Lunachkin?, Lyubov', Lyuder, Makran, Malatok, Malkovich
Marder, Margish, Margolis, Markevich, Mashkovich, Maslensky
Maslyansky, Matusov, Menaker, Mendelev, Menlakh, Migdalov
Milchin, Milin, Milov, Mlodik, Mnushchin, Mnushin
Model'zon, Mogil'nik, Molchan, Mones, Moravchik, Morfel'
Murovits, Mushin, Muslin, Myshlov, Nagin, Naimark
Naishtein, Nankin, Naskelter, Neikrus, Neiman, Neimburg
Nekrich, Neprich, Nikel'burg, Nirenburg, Nisbom, Nizovsky
Nodel'fel, Nodembukh, Novik, Nusbom, Ogorodnik, Ogul
Oravkin, Osovsky, Ostrovsky, Padersky, Palchik, Parich
Pekal', Perepletchik, Perkil', Perlin, Pernin, Pesotsky
Petrushka, Petrushkin, Petsonka, Pik, Piltsman, Pincha
Pinda, Pines, Pirakhovsky, Podroisky, Polyak, Pomeranch
Postav, Pragel', Proekt, Prostak, Pulin, Radushkov
Rakov, Rapoport, Rashker, Ratner, Ratrogovich?, Ratsven
Ravnes?, Razrat, Reinshtein, Reinzon, Revel's, Ribakov
Riglyan?, Riklin, Rodny, Rogovy, Rondes, Rozenbum
Rozenshain, Rozhevsky, Rozmarin, Rubinshtein, Rubinsky, Ryaby
Safir, Safron, Saginur, Samson, Seglin, Shain
Shapira, Sharapansky, Sheftel', Sheiba, Sheimov, Sheinberg
Sheinkel', Sheinman, Shenderov, Shildkrot, Shiling, Shindel'
Shindel'man, Shintser, Shishel'?, Shlemkin, Shmergel', Sholkov
Shol'ts, Shor, Shostak, Shranberg, Shternshus, Shutkin
Shvarts, Shvedok, Shvedsky?, Shvider, Shyein, Simpler
Sinagubka, Sirop, Sirotovich, Skipal'sky, Slivki, Sol'nik
Solop, Sopovich, Starishok, Stepukov, Strugach, Surgan
Teinberg, Telushka, Temchin, Teplin, Tishler?, Tivin
Tombak, Tomushov, Topelov, Travin, Trifon, Troichansky
Tsarovtsa, Tsenter, Tsirkel', Tsurkov, Tsviron, Tsymering
Tsyrkel', Tsytrin, Tsytver, Tulchin, Turchiner, Turov
Tverdy, Tyshler, Uzdin, Vaisman, Vengrov, Vibis
Vildaver, Vil'davsky, Vishchin, Vishnin, Vishtok, Volershtein
Volkovisky, Vygodsky, Yabel'nik, Yabrov, Yaglin, Yagoda
Yampol, Yamshchik, Yarkha, Yezvin, Yudenkop, Yuriskov
Zadubey, Zagur?, Zaides?, Zakin, Zalkin, Zaltsman
Zeldes, Zeliger, Zhilikhov, Zhitin, Zhultich, Zusmanov

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Slutsk, Minsk gubernia, revision list 1816-1818 #general

Vcharny@...
 

Below is surname list I compiled and transliterated >from Russian.
The source is revision list of 1816 (second part -- additional revision
of 1818 - I hope to compile soon). It is available on LDS microfilm
#2010468. After more close work with records some corrections
could be made.

Differ >from many other towns Jewish records of that time I read,
Slutsk show greatest diversity of surnames. Just small part is repeated.
It means high probability in determination of ancestor family just by surname.

Adrov, Aiker?, Aizenberg, Aizentson, Altanin?, Altman
Altshul, Apel'tsyn, Arpush, Atkenaz, Azyor?, Badkhan
Bagamol, Baikov, Barakon, Bariks?, Barshay?, Basin
Baslavsky, Beiles, Beinvol, Belov?, Bely, Ber..nin
Bereznik, Berman, Bezruchin, Birger, Blank, Blokh
Bludny, Blyand, Bobekein, Bogushev, Bol'shtein, Bomeil'
Bomshtein, Bondarov, Bord, Boretsky, Borisovsky, Braver
Bresky, Broda, Brodsky, Bronshtein, Brosd?, Bulkov?
Bunimov, Bunin, Byaly, Chapran, Charny, Chinkov
Chipchin, Dalginov, Dalkov?, Del'bukh, Derechin, Dervin
Diment, Dobromisli, Dolgov, Dubel'tin, Dubovsky, Dubrov
Dubrovets, Dultsis, Dushkov, Ebin, Efronov, Efrost
Eigenburg, Elingmos?, Elkonovich, El'lin, Emanuel', Enishbliz?
Epshtein, Eraev, Fainshtein, Faivusyev, Farber, Fialkov
Finkel', Finkel'shtein, Fisher, Freinkel', Fridlyand, Ful'makht
Gabar?, Galkin, Galnes, Gal'pern, Garmiza, Gedansky
Gefter, Geiman, Gel'barg, Gel'but, Gel'fand, Genda?
German, Gikhan, Gildener, Gil'zer, Gintsberg, Ginzberg
Girshin, Girshov, Gisin, Giter, Gites, Gleiter
Gleter, Glozman, Glum, Gokhdarf, Gokhmark, Gol'berg
Goldbam, Goldberg, Goldgand?, Goler, Golub, Gopin
Gor, Gorodets, Gorokhov, Graes?, Granat, Granov
Grebenechnik, Grinberg, Grinshtein, Grobshtein, Gubar', Gurovits
Guspin, Gutenmakher, Guttsait, Imerman, Indik, Ispanin
Ivansky, Ivan'sky, Izin, Kagna, Kantina, Kantorovich
Kapelyahih, Kaplan, Karman, Karmin, Kasber, Katsenel'son
Khagiz, Kharat, Kharik, Kharosh, Khaskin, Kheifets
Khibnin, Khmarny, Khorosh, Kibalkin, Kinor, Klavich
Klavner, Kleshchik, Klotsvach, Knigos?, Knigov, Kopcher?
Kopulensky, Kosovsky, Kotner, Kototvich, Kovin, Kozanin
Kozlin, Kozlirapik?, Krachak, Krachan, Kraft, Krainy
Krakov, Kramen, Kramin, Kraskov, Krasnov, Kreines
Kretskov, Krivodel, Krupnik, Kugel', Kuicher, Kunaev
Kurkov, Kurlyand, Kushka, Kusmin, Landa, Lansky
Lapidus, Latsenberg, Leshkovich, Levikalov, Levitan, Liberman
Libes, Lifshits, Likhter, Liles, Lilin, Lipmanov
Lipshin, Livov, Lotnik, Lubinshtein, Lubshtein, Lulin
Lunachkin?, Lyubov', Lyuder, Makran, Malatok, Malkovich
Marder, Margish, Margolis, Markevich, Mashkovich, Maslensky
Maslyansky, Matusov, Menaker, Mendelev, Menlakh, Migdalov
Milchin, Milin, Milov, Mlodik, Mnushchin, Mnushin
Model'zon, Mogil'nik, Molchan, Mones, Moravchik, Morfel'
Murovits, Mushin, Muslin, Myshlov, Nagin, Naimark
Naishtein, Nankin, Naskelter, Neikrus, Neiman, Neimburg
Nekrich, Neprich, Nikel'burg, Nirenburg, Nisbom, Nizovsky
Nodel'fel, Nodembukh, Novik, Nusbom, Ogorodnik, Ogul
Oravkin, Osovsky, Ostrovsky, Padersky, Palchik, Parich
Pekal', Perepletchik, Perkil', Perlin, Pernin, Pesotsky
Petrushka, Petrushkin, Petsonka, Pik, Piltsman, Pincha
Pinda, Pines, Pirakhovsky, Podroisky, Polyak, Pomeranch
Postav, Pragel', Proekt, Prostak, Pulin, Radushkov
Rakov, Rapoport, Rashker, Ratner, Ratrogovich?, Ratsven
Ravnes?, Razrat, Reinshtein, Reinzon, Revel's, Ribakov
Riglyan?, Riklin, Rodny, Rogovy, Rondes, Rozenbum
Rozenshain, Rozhevsky, Rozmarin, Rubinshtein, Rubinsky, Ryaby
Safir, Safron, Saginur, Samson, Seglin, Shain
Shapira, Sharapansky, Sheftel', Sheiba, Sheimov, Sheinberg
Sheinkel', Sheinman, Shenderov, Shildkrot, Shiling, Shindel'
Shindel'man, Shintser, Shishel'?, Shlemkin, Shmergel', Sholkov
Shol'ts, Shor, Shostak, Shranberg, Shternshus, Shutkin
Shvarts, Shvedok, Shvedsky?, Shvider, Shyein, Simpler
Sinagubka, Sirop, Sirotovich, Skipal'sky, Slivki, Sol'nik
Solop, Sopovich, Starishok, Stepukov, Strugach, Surgan
Teinberg, Telushka, Temchin, Teplin, Tishler?, Tivin
Tombak, Tomushov, Topelov, Travin, Trifon, Troichansky
Tsarovtsa, Tsenter, Tsirkel', Tsurkov, Tsviron, Tsymering
Tsyrkel', Tsytrin, Tsytver, Tulchin, Turchiner, Turov
Tverdy, Tyshler, Uzdin, Vaisman, Vengrov, Vibis
Vildaver, Vil'davsky, Vishchin, Vishnin, Vishtok, Volershtein
Volkovisky, Vygodsky, Yabel'nik, Yabrov, Yaglin, Yagoda
Yampol, Yamshchik, Yarkha, Yezvin, Yudenkop, Yuriskov
Zadubey, Zagur?, Zaides?, Zakin, Zalkin, Zaltsman
Zeldes, Zeliger, Zhilikhov, Zhitin, Zhultich, Zusmanov

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


Re: Mandatory Names changes #general

Stephen G. Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Rita Margolies wrote:

My relative went to Palestine sometime during 1910-1922. His European name
was Shoil Pikholz, but many Jews Hebraicized their names when they arrived
and supposedly there was a standard way to do this. I was told there is
something in the archives, but I can't find it. Does anyone have any
information for me?
What you describe was a two-step process. First, new immigrants adopted
Sephardic given names informally. Someone like myself (I was born Stefan) was
supposed to become Shmuel or Shlomo. I demurred and rejected those names
(based only on the fact that in German the "st" of "Stefan" was pronounced
"sh"). My father became Imanuel >from Arnold (because "Arnold" was written with
an aleph). I chose Gidon (and I hate the English transliteration that makes it
into Giddy-YON).
In 1935, we went before a British military judge who asked us to swear on a
King James Bible. My father raised hell. A Tanach was brought in and we duly
became Imanuel and Gidon. But of more importance, we adopted the family name
of our Yemenite washer woman, Ezrati.
Alas, when my father transliterated it into Latin letters, he did so using
German phonetics, making it "Esrati." That makes us the only Esratis in the
world.
Records of the change of first names do not exist. But the court proceedings
do.
I would wager that your relative would have become Shaul immediately, since
Shoil is just an Ashkenazic pronunciation of that name.
--
Stephen G. Esrati

http://pw1.netcom.com/~cohiba/comrade.html

PO Box 20130
Shaker Heights, OH 44120
(216) 561-9393


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mandatory Names changes #general

Stephen G. Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Rita Margolies wrote:

My relative went to Palestine sometime during 1910-1922. His European name
was Shoil Pikholz, but many Jews Hebraicized their names when they arrived
and supposedly there was a standard way to do this. I was told there is
something in the archives, but I can't find it. Does anyone have any
information for me?
What you describe was a two-step process. First, new immigrants adopted
Sephardic given names informally. Someone like myself (I was born Stefan) was
supposed to become Shmuel or Shlomo. I demurred and rejected those names
(based only on the fact that in German the "st" of "Stefan" was pronounced
"sh"). My father became Imanuel >from Arnold (because "Arnold" was written with
an aleph). I chose Gidon (and I hate the English transliteration that makes it
into Giddy-YON).
In 1935, we went before a British military judge who asked us to swear on a
King James Bible. My father raised hell. A Tanach was brought in and we duly
became Imanuel and Gidon. But of more importance, we adopted the family name
of our Yemenite washer woman, Ezrati.
Alas, when my father transliterated it into Latin letters, he did so using
German phonetics, making it "Esrati." That makes us the only Esratis in the
world.
Records of the change of first names do not exist. But the court proceedings
do.
I would wager that your relative would have become Shaul immediately, since
Shoil is just an Ashkenazic pronunciation of that name.
--
Stephen G. Esrati

http://pw1.netcom.com/~cohiba/comrade.html

PO Box 20130
Shaker Heights, OH 44120
(216) 561-9393


Re: World's Fair #general

Richard Tasgal <tasgal@...>
 

Allison Duke <allison.duke@...> writes:
There was [a World's Fair] in 1939.
I had been planning to ask the following question another time, when I was
going to be in a more convenient location, but since the topic is under
discussion now, I will ask now.

Two of my great grandparents had made plans to visit the 1939 World's
Fair (>from Maciejow, which is near Kovel, then part of Poland). About six
weeks before they planned to go, the war broke out, and they were trapped.
(I have met people who survived the war because they were at the World's
Fair when the war started.)

What documentation would exist in connection to this? How would you go
about getting it?

--
Richard Tasgal
tasgal@...
http://www.math.tau.ac.il/~tasgal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: World's Fair #general

Richard Tasgal <tasgal@...>
 

Allison Duke <allison.duke@...> writes:
There was [a World's Fair] in 1939.
I had been planning to ask the following question another time, when I was
going to be in a more convenient location, but since the topic is under
discussion now, I will ask now.

Two of my great grandparents had made plans to visit the 1939 World's
Fair (>from Maciejow, which is near Kovel, then part of Poland). About six
weeks before they planned to go, the war broke out, and they were trapped.
(I have met people who survived the war because they were at the World's
Fair when the war started.)

What documentation would exist in connection to this? How would you go
about getting it?

--
Richard Tasgal
tasgal@...
http://www.math.tau.ac.il/~tasgal


Nusach HoAri Shul in Montreal #general

Michoel Ronn <chromelion@...>
 

Shmarya Richler stated that the Nusach HoAri Shul in Montreal was not
founded by Lubavitchers. I beg to differ for on p. 49 of Lawrence
Tepper's "A Biographical Dictionary of Canadian Jewry 1909 - 1914" is
mentioned that Congregation Nusach Hoari of Montreal was incorporated in
1910. Among the founders listed, in fact, is Isaac Lavut and his father
Menasseh Lavut (died 1931), who was a great-uncle of the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson (1902 - 1994), of blessed memory. In
addition, Menasseh was a son of Rabbi Avrohom Dovid Lavut, one of the
greatest Chassidim of the third Lubavitcher Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek.
Rabbi A.D. Lavut was an author of holy books used widely until this very
day among Torah scholars in most religious circles.

Note: Many who are not used to the Yiddish spelling style used by Rabbi
Lavut in spelling his surname mistransliterate his surname as Lavat or
Lavaut. He spelled his surname in Yiddish as follows: lamed, alef, vov,
vov, alef, vov, tes. The "shtumer alef" (silent alef) after the two vovs
is still commonly used in many circles, although not advocated by the
Yiddish spelling standards advocated by the Czernowitz Yiddish Conference
of 1908.

I would like to add that in Eastern Europe, not all people who prayed
with a Nusach HoAri prayer book had connections with Chabad Chassidism or
even Chassidism. In America, however, all synagogues having the words
"Nusach HoAri" in their name were connected with Chabad-Lubavitch.

Yours Truly,
Michoel Ronn
Brooklyn, NY
chromelion@...


Texas Naturalization #general

MARK MICHAELS <Dragon_Michaels@...>
 

Can anyone tell me where to write for documentation regarding a
NaturalisationCettificate #15207
Petition volume one page 15 stub(?) volume one page 7

State of Texas, County of Dallas
44th district court on 6th day of June 1908
WHG a subject of Great Britain and Ireland Edward VII King of
in Dallas 6 June 1908 44th District court cert No 15207

Many Thanks
Mark J Michaels
Mark J Michaels
Dragon Hotel UK =

Dragon_Michaels@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Texas Naturalization #general

MARK MICHAELS <Dragon_Michaels@...>
 

Can anyone tell me where to write for documentation regarding a
NaturalisationCettificate #15207
Petition volume one page 15 stub(?) volume one page 7

State of Texas, County of Dallas
44th district court on 6th day of June 1908
WHG a subject of Great Britain and Ireland Edward VII King of
in Dallas 6 June 1908 44th District court cert No 15207

Many Thanks
Mark J Michaels
Mark J Michaels
Dragon Hotel UK =

Dragon_Michaels@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nusach HoAri Shul in Montreal #general

Michoel Ronn <chromelion@...>
 

Shmarya Richler stated that the Nusach HoAri Shul in Montreal was not
founded by Lubavitchers. I beg to differ for on p. 49 of Lawrence
Tepper's "A Biographical Dictionary of Canadian Jewry 1909 - 1914" is
mentioned that Congregation Nusach Hoari of Montreal was incorporated in
1910. Among the founders listed, in fact, is Isaac Lavut and his father
Menasseh Lavut (died 1931), who was a great-uncle of the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson (1902 - 1994), of blessed memory. In
addition, Menasseh was a son of Rabbi Avrohom Dovid Lavut, one of the
greatest Chassidim of the third Lubavitcher Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek.
Rabbi A.D. Lavut was an author of holy books used widely until this very
day among Torah scholars in most religious circles.

Note: Many who are not used to the Yiddish spelling style used by Rabbi
Lavut in spelling his surname mistransliterate his surname as Lavat or
Lavaut. He spelled his surname in Yiddish as follows: lamed, alef, vov,
vov, alef, vov, tes. The "shtumer alef" (silent alef) after the two vovs
is still commonly used in many circles, although not advocated by the
Yiddish spelling standards advocated by the Czernowitz Yiddish Conference
of 1908.

I would like to add that in Eastern Europe, not all people who prayed
with a Nusach HoAri prayer book had connections with Chabad Chassidism or
even Chassidism. In America, however, all synagogues having the words
"Nusach HoAri" in their name were connected with Chabad-Lubavitch.

Yours Truly,
Michoel Ronn
Brooklyn, NY
chromelion@...


Khazaric/Sorbian Roots #general

Deb Greenberg <deb@...>
 

K've been working on my genealogy for many years. In fact, the
earliest I can trace my "jewish" roots is to Russia about
1750. They lived "beyond the Pale of Settlement" alloted to them
by Russian Tsars, account these self-professing "jews" had so
many times fomented rebellion and plotted to kill the Russian
Tsar.

In reading history, linguistics, genetics, and genealogies, I
see that my "jewish" roots don't really trace to any wishful
diaspora >from out of the Middle East. In fact, it very much
appears that our Ashkenazi "jewish" ancestors merely adopted
Palestinian Judaism, a few hundred years ago. The Tel Aviv
linguistics professor, Dr.Wexler, has turned up some very
revealing material on the true origins of our Eastern European
ancestry. He says that while we have a Khazar component that
we are more Slavic and Turkic. Professor Wexler refers to this
race in history as the "Sorbians" --who were a sort of earlier
Slavic type.

Since, Ashkenazi do not at all trace to Semitic or Palestinian
Jews, I would like to see more research done on the history of
our Slavic/Turkic/Khazaric race. We may not be truly Jewish or
at all Semitic, but it is quite interesting to try and figure
out where and when we have grafted so many interesting "jewish"
traditions into our own.

Good Luck To ALL In Family History Research!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Khazaric/Sorbian Roots #general

Deb Greenberg <deb@...>
 

K've been working on my genealogy for many years. In fact, the
earliest I can trace my "jewish" roots is to Russia about
1750. They lived "beyond the Pale of Settlement" alloted to them
by Russian Tsars, account these self-professing "jews" had so
many times fomented rebellion and plotted to kill the Russian
Tsar.

In reading history, linguistics, genetics, and genealogies, I
see that my "jewish" roots don't really trace to any wishful
diaspora >from out of the Middle East. In fact, it very much
appears that our Ashkenazi "jewish" ancestors merely adopted
Palestinian Judaism, a few hundred years ago. The Tel Aviv
linguistics professor, Dr.Wexler, has turned up some very
revealing material on the true origins of our Eastern European
ancestry. He says that while we have a Khazar component that
we are more Slavic and Turkic. Professor Wexler refers to this
race in history as the "Sorbians" --who were a sort of earlier
Slavic type.

Since, Ashkenazi do not at all trace to Semitic or Palestinian
Jews, I would like to see more research done on the history of
our Slavic/Turkic/Khazaric race. We may not be truly Jewish or
at all Semitic, but it is quite interesting to try and figure
out where and when we have grafted so many interesting "jewish"
traditions into our own.

Good Luck To ALL In Family History Research!


thank you #general

BREST FAMILY <angi@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

A big thank you to all of you who have sent the most enlightening
information to me on the name CHLAVNA. I have shared your information with
the Lapidus Group members who have also Chlavnas in their family. I have
written to most of you privately as well. THANK YOU.

------------

ANNE LAPEDUS BREST. Sandton South Africa.
Researching: : LAPEDUS/LAPIDUS (all spellings) Lithuania, Latvia,
Poland.
BREST - Bauska, Latvia.


Re: Revision List #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Ilya Zeldes, in his comments on Howard Margol's explanation of the meaning of
Revizskaia Skazka, fails to note that the modern meaning of "skazka" is "fairy
tale" (ref Harper Collins Russian Dictionary,1994).
Hello Robert,
I'm a Jew born in Russia, emigrated to the USA being 46 years old. Russian is
my mother tongue.
What you had read in Harper Collins Russian Dictionary, 1994 has nothing to do
with expression "Revizskaia Skazka" that is more than 300 years old.
I'm afraid you will confuse some other genealogists as well as yourself.
Ilya Zeldes is 100% right and I suspect that he is of Russian origin himself.
Only a native speaker can know that intricasy.
Cordially,
Mark Grekin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen thank you #general

BREST FAMILY <angi@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

A big thank you to all of you who have sent the most enlightening
information to me on the name CHLAVNA. I have shared your information with
the Lapidus Group members who have also Chlavnas in their family. I have
written to most of you privately as well. THANK YOU.

------------

ANNE LAPEDUS BREST. Sandton South Africa.
Researching: : LAPEDUS/LAPIDUS (all spellings) Lithuania, Latvia,
Poland.
BREST - Bauska, Latvia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Revision List #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Ilya Zeldes, in his comments on Howard Margol's explanation of the meaning of
Revizskaia Skazka, fails to note that the modern meaning of "skazka" is "fairy
tale" (ref Harper Collins Russian Dictionary,1994).
Hello Robert,
I'm a Jew born in Russia, emigrated to the USA being 46 years old. Russian is
my mother tongue.
What you had read in Harper Collins Russian Dictionary, 1994 has nothing to do
with expression "Revizskaia Skazka" that is more than 300 years old.
I'm afraid you will confuse some other genealogists as well as yourself.
Ilya Zeldes is 100% right and I suspect that he is of Russian origin himself.
Only a native speaker can know that intricasy.
Cordially,
Mark Grekin