Date   

Re: Post-WWII Records for Ufa #records #russia

Jx. Gx.
 

Mike Vayser,

I think what Rita meant to say is that Russian soldiers looked down on Jews and considered them poor soldiers.  She, herself, was not making that judgment. We know from the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and perhaps from thousands of other examples, as well as from your statistics that the claim of Jews having been poor soldiers/fighters isn't true.

Respectfully,

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona


Lawrence Heller #names

Chava Masha Coplon
 

Hello,
I am trying to get contact information for Lawrence Heller. He posted on this group many, many years ago. I was told he may have information on my Eibschutz family.
Any leads are greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Chava Masha


Re: How to obtain original record from Pinkas HaNitzolim II list; Wasserspring #warsaw

Valentin Lupu
 

Hi Elizabeth,
Here is an image of the survivor card



Valentin Lupu
ISRAEL


ViewMate marriage certificates in Polish #poland #translation

Alex Guri
 

Hello,

I've posted marriage records in Polish for which I'd appreciate a translation.
They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89339
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89338
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89212
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89057

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much,
Alex Guri


Meaning of nickname Cuttie #names

Felissa Lashley
 

One of our cousins, Julius LASSEN/LISHINSKY/LESCHINSKY son of
Isaac/Isaiah from the Ukraine was known within the family as "Cuttie".
Does anyone have any idea what this nickname might refer to?

Thank you.

Felissa Lashley
frlashley@...
Austin, Texas

Researching: DROBITSKY, MOZER/MAZUR/MAZURENKO; MAYSTROVOIY/MEISTROFF; FILTSKE;
LISHINSKY/LESCHINSKY; ZATULOVSKY/SATLOW; and towns of VALYAVA,
GORODISCHE, KORSUN; MOSHNY


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #belarus

Bruce Drake
 

I never imagined that I would come across a Yizkor book excerpt about New York City’s famous Stage Deli which closed in 2012 after a run of about 75 years.

Actually, it is mostly about its founder, Max Asnas (spelled “Osnas” in this chapter from the book of Koidanov, now Dzyarzhynsk, in Belarus). The Stage became a magnet for celebrities ranging from actors and comedians to sports stars but in this account, Max’s sister Lilly, who was the cashier, tells the writer: ““They are not my kind of people. I have little in common with them. I think more highly of Avram Reisen and other Yiddish writers than of all the Broadway folks with whom Max associates. He feels like a fish in water with them. I feel a lot better being with my friends, with Koydenov folk.”

The excerpt recounts Max’s eventful journey to reach New York and appears in the book which was published in 1955. Asnas died in 1968.


Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Documents from the Lithuanian Embassy in Riga (Latvia) #lithuania #latvia #records

Arlene Beare
 

Information about Lithuanian Jews who lived in Riga for 1914 and the beginning of 1915 are in the registers of Jew who asked for a residence permit in Riga for 1914-1915 (archival fond Riga Police Administration). There are also house registers of Riga till 1918 but it is very important to know the address where the person lived. The House Registers and the Fond for Riga Police are not online and you would have to write to the Archives with the Address for information from House Registers. 

 

The documents of Lithuanian Embassy in Riga are kept in Lithuanian archives.  Lithuania was a part of Russian Empire till 1918.  As Russ Maurer has said there was no Lithuanian Embassy in Riga till after 1919.


Arlene Beare
Co-director Latvia Research Division.

 

 


help finding a Russian poem #russia #translation

Aline Petzold
 

Hello all:
 I am wondering of anyone recognizes these lines written in of verse?  They were part of a letter to my grandmother, in Romania, in December 1915.  I am   told they are Russian and some kind of a love poem, perhaps describing the end of an affair.  I have tried to find  the original poem, but have not succeeded so far.  Thanks for your help.
Aline Petzold
St. Paul, MN


Re: How to obtain original record from Pinkas HaNitzolim II list; Wasserspring #warsaw

sharonrf18@...
 

To find documentation on survivors, I’ve done traces through the US Holocaust Museum. I believe you can also use the Arolsen Archives as well. I’ve been able to find some documentation on survivors on the Arolsen’s website before requesting a trace too. . If the individual remained in Poland, the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw (genealogy division) may have some records as well. Good luck!

Sharon Fleitman
Atlanta, Georgia


Re: Russian Translation needed please #russia #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

In Russian:

 

На память М-ел Циле Бузик (возможно) от Моисея Гейщика (возможно).

Память о худших из плохих дней моей жизни, да пройдут они скорее, вздохнуть свободной грудью.

Дзыговко

Декабрь 1912

 

Translated into English:

 

In memory of M-el Tsilya Buzik (possibly) from Moisey Geischik (possibly).

The memory of the worst of the bad days of my life, may they pass sooner, breathe free chest.

M.J.G.  Dzygovko

December 1912


Translated by Michael Ryabinky
Boynton Beach, FL


Re: Documents from the Lithuanian Embassy in Riga (Latvia) #lithuania #latvia #records

Diane Jacobs
 

Brenda,

After 20 years of searching for my great grandfather’s family when I learned that their
last residence in 1888 was Vilna before emigrating, I had not found anything for them in the ALD databases on Jewishgen.  Lo and behold just a few months ago someone suggested a different spelling of the name
And now I have found not only his siblings, but his father’s siblings in three towns in Lithuania.

Genealogy is a combination of luck and grey
matter, so be creative in the spelling and phonetics of the names you are researching.

Diane Jacobs


On Jan 8, 2021, at 6:55 AM, Brentsi <bhabshush@...> wrote:

Shalom Luciana🌸
Coulb be that you have done me a favor!
 My grandfather who migrated to Leeds UK  was thought to have been born in Riga.
But his father..married twice originated from Kovna,Lithuania.
I never found any listings anywhere for him or his wives (not for want to searching on every possible search engine)
So... I shall enquire about those archives.
Best wishes,
Brenda Bernstein Habshush.
Israel.

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Re: Documents from the Lithuanian Embassy in Riga (Latvia) #lithuania #latvia #records

Russ Maurer
 

Hello Luciana and Brenda,

I am replying to the group as this topic may be of interest to others.

Fund 383 in the Lithuanian State Central Archives (LCVA) contains documents related to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. A number of files in this record group contain documents from the embassy in Riga. From a distance it is impossible to know what is in these documents. I see the following in the catalog:
LCVA/383/7/35 Documents on the activities of the embassy in Latvia, 1919-1920
LCVA/383/7/72 ditto, 1920-1921
LCVA/383/7/94 Documents of the activities of Lithuanian embassies and consulates, 1919-1920 (not specific to Latvia)
LCVA/383/7/265 and 266 Documents on the activities of the embassy in Latvia, 1921-1922

There are other, similar files.

LCVA/383/15 contains applications for foreign passports submitted to the Riga embassy. The Jewish ones have all been indexed by LitvakSIG and can be searched in the All-Lithuania Database.

Independent Lithuania came into existence in 1919. Prior to that, there were no Lithuanian embassies, in Riga or anywhere else.

Finally, if you are a donor to any of the LitvakSIG research groups, you can use your login credentials on the LitvakSIG website to access our Collective Data page. Among the record groups on this page are several of direct relevance to those researching Lithuanian Jews with a Latvia connection. Included are extracts of Latvian vital records, extracts from the 1897 census, extracts from Riga house registers (interwar period), and more.

Russ Maurer
Records Acquisition and Translation coordinator, LitvakSIG


Re: surname Blum #names

Doug Cohen
 

My mother's family were Blums in Boston.  Her father was from Plock guborniya in what is now Poland.  Their name was Bluman and those who came to the US became either Blum or Bloom.
--


Doug Cohen
Sarasota, Florida
Lexington, MA


Re: Documents from the Lithuanian Embassy in Riga (Latvia) #lithuania #latvia #records

Brentsi
 

Shalom Luciana🌸
Coulb be that you have done me a favor!
 My grandfather who migrated to Leeds UK  was thought to have been born in Riga.
But his father..married twice originated from Kovna,Lithuania.
I never found any listings anywhere for him or his wives (not for want to searching on every possible search engine)
So... I shall enquire about those archives.
Best wishes,
Brenda Bernstein Habshush.
Israel.


NYT article about archives #general #records

Barbara Hershey
 

For those of us who love archives, here’s an article link from today’s New York Times.

The Record Keepers’ Rave

Every month, the archival institutions of this nation unleash tiny particles of the past in a frenzy of online revelry.

 

 

Barbara Hershey

Portland, Oregon, USA

 

 

 


Re: Post-WWII Records for Ufa #records #russia

mvayser@...
 

On Thu, Jan 7, 2021 at 05:24 PM, <rivke1@...> wrote:
Generally Jews were not considered to be good soldiers so when they were conscripted they were put into labour battalions rather than fight on the front.

Rita,
That's an outrageous anti-Semitic statement, if I've ever heard one.  This is what I heard while growing up from anti-Semites , despite numerous members of my family dying on the battlefield, leaving their children to grow up without fathers and others returning wounded .  It's a shame to see these statements on a Jewish Gen list.

Easy check on Wikipedia, shows that according to the Central archive of the Ministry of Defense of Russia, there were over half a million Jews in the Soviet army, including 167000 officers of all ranks.  During the war, 198000 died in battle, from wounds, and illnesses, or were missing in action.  That's 39.6%.   According to some sources, 120-180000 died on the battle field and about 80000 were murdered in the concentration/extermination camps.  Out of the remaining 300000, 180000 were wounded and out of that number 70000 heavily wounded.  According to one historian, 27% of Jewish soldiers voluntereed and 80% of privates and junior officers served in the forward-deployed units.

Mike Vayser


Re: Post-WWII Records for Ufa #records #russia

rivke1@...
 


Greetings from Sydney Australia!

Although I cannot help with birth records I can provide some more information about why people went to Ufa - my parents lived there until 1946 when they were repatriated to Poland and my brother was born there. I am currently researching how and why people went to Ufa and other towns in the Soviet interior.

1. When Hitler invaded Poland 1st September 1939 and Stalin invaded from the east on 17 September hundreds of thousands (not just Jews) fled east into the Soviet zone. This Zone was known as the Eastern borderlands and was basically made up of Belorus and Ukraine. The decision was made in a rush, panic was everywhere but the overriding thought was communism or fascism? Hitler or Stalin? In testimonies those who went east made comments such as:
   a. There is plunder on the one hand and plunder on the other but the Russians plunder one as a citizen and a man while the Nazis plunder one as a Jew.
   b. And so one moment decides a person's fate - one runs this way, the other that way and neither knows what the future holds in store.  But what can the future hold for a Jew I ask? Here it is bad and there it's no good.

People went by any transport available but many on foot. Parents encouraged the young ones to go, families were broken up but ecpected to be reunited. More men than women went since they were in danger of being conscripted, Women wanted to stay with parents or didn't want to travel with little children. They often employed people smugglers to help them cross  the rivers to get to the Soviet side. The two major cities they went to were Bialystok and Lwow which became intensely overcrowded with little work available.

2. Stalin immediately wanted to turn his new territories into extensions of the communist state. Permanent residents immediately became Soviet citizens and a chaotic process called "Sovietization" began. As well as severe economic consequences, the NKVD quickly began to identify class enemies and other undesirables who were then deported to the gulags or special settlements. The refugees who had fled to the Soviet zone were offered Soviet "passports". If they refused they were to be sent back to Poland - one of Stalin's ruses. They were in fact put on cattle trains for weeks and weeks and travelled deep into remote territories to liv and work in appalling conditions.

Becoming a citizen could also mean being conscripted into the Red Army and then be sent anywhere they were needed. Generally Jews were not considered to be good soldiers so when they were conscripted they were put into labour battalions rather than fight on the front. I believe this is what happened to my father and why he ended up in Ufa where he worked on the railways. He even received an invalid pension after his leg was injured in a  railway accident. My mother also worked for the Red Army as a seamstress - her job was to sew the long Russian nightshirts worn by the officers.

3. When Hitler broke the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact in June 1941, more chaos ensued.  Stalin ordered factories and war plants to be dismantled and put on trains to get them out of the hands of the Germans. He chose major centres such as Ufa where the factories and plants were rebuilt to provide machinery and vehicles for the war effort. He also evacuated betweeen 1 and 2 million civilians many of whom were needed to run the factories and work in them. Ufa was a particularly useful area - oilfields, railways, mines and a major waterway. So your relatives could have been caught up in these evacuations. I haven't ruled out the possibility that my parents were caught up in these evacuation also.
You say that your family were from Lwow originally but perhaps they were not Lwow born - perhaps they also fled to Lwow from Poland escaping Hitler. Even if they were Lwow natives they still might have taken the opportunity to escape the Nazi invasion.

The overwhelming tragedy of this story is that those Jews who had fled to the Soviet zone and were unable or unwilling  to move further east in June 1941 were then subject to the brutal murders perpetrated in Belarus and Ukriane by the Einsatzgruppen. About 1 million Jews were murdered. The irony was that those who were deported to "Siberia" survived and formed the She'erit Hapletah or the surviving remnant of the Jews of POland. Although up to 30% perished in Siberia due to  disease, hunger, hard labour and terrible weather, around 250,000 did ultimately survive and were repatriated to Poland mostly in 1946. Stalin did not set out intentionally to save these Jews - he was after all fairly anti-Semitic. It was more that he benignly accepted their presence and they were to come into good use post war (a completely different yet fascinating story).

This part of the Holocaust story has been largely neglected till recently - it's a story that fell through the cracks. Up till recently, a  holocaust  survivor was defined by being in a camp or in hiding or  under false papers. People who "ran away" could not be classed as survivors. Historians have begun unravelling this extraordinary tale. It's a story that has many parts - a most fascinating one is about about when the refugees and deportees were amnestied and the all flocked to Central Asia where they spent years in Tashkent and Samarkand and other exotoc places. 

It's a complex piece of history and has taken me along time and a lot of reading to unravel this geo-political tale. But I do hope this helps to explain part of the Lwow/Ufa story.

Rita Nash
Sydney
 







   

 




Seeking family of Yehuda and Nehama YUDOVITCH in Israel formerly YUDELEVICH from Lithuania #israel

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear JewishGen,
 
I am seeking the children and grandchildren of Yehuda and Nehama POPEL YUDOVITCH (YUDELEVICH) in Israel, possibly in the Haifa area.  Our family had thought that our cousin Yehuda had perished with his mother Leia Malke GOLDSHMIDT Yudelevich and siblings in the Shoah.  I just saw a photo of Yehuda and information that he and his family lived in  Binyamina, Hadera, Haifa, Israel where he died in about 1984-1985.  It would mean so much to have contact with his family.  Please feel free to give my email, jcwsmg@....
 
Thank you,
Susan Goldsmith
San Francisco Bay Area
jcwsmg@...
 
Researching: GOLDSHMIDT,GITTES(GADIE,GADYE,GIDUT,GDUD, GOIDA),F(P)ILVINSKY,SHOLOM(SHLOM(SHLIOMOVICH,
Lithuania: Seta, Kaunas, Jonava, Ukmerge,Vandziogala, Kedainiai, Merkine,
Vilijampole, Adutiskis, Zemaiciu Naumiestes
 
TOBIAS,ROZHANSKY,MIRANSKY,BILINSKY, PROTAS Belarus: NovyySverzhen, Stowbtsy,Yasevichi, Mir
GUREWICZ,DROZNAN Belarus: Dauhinava, Vileika  
 
KOENIGSBERG,WAKS(X)MAN Poland: Sandomierz, Ostrowiec 
SONNENBLIK Galicia Poland: Lancut, Kanczuga
DAVIS(D), HAFNER Romania: Botosani,,Roman
 

 



--
Susan Goldsmith
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
jcwsmg@...
Researching GOLDSHMIDT, F(P)ILVINSKY, SHLIOMOVICH, GITTES (GADIE,GADYE, GIDUSH, GITES) Seta, Jonava, Kaunas, Adustiskes, Zemaiciu Naumiestes, Keidainiai, Ukmerge, Vandziogala, Lithuania
HOROWITZ, DRASNIN (DRASNE) Dauhinava, Belarus; TOBIAS (TOUBES, TOBES, TAUBES) Novyy Swerzhen and Stowbtsy, Belarus; ROZANSKY, BILINSKY, MIRANSKY Iasevichi, Belarus
DAVIS, HAFFNER Botosani, Romania
WAXMAN (WAKSMAN), KOENIGSBERG Sandomierz, Ostrowiec Poland


Re: Help with translation of yizkorbooks #poland #translation

Max Heffler
 

Paulette,

There is a project for the translation:

 

https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zelow/Zelow.html

 

but only the names at the back have been transliterated and added.

 

Max Heffler

Houston, TX

Yizkor Book Project Volunteer

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Paulette via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 12:59 PM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Help with translation of yizkorbooks #poland #translation

 

I need a English translation from the yizkor boob of zelow poland
--
Paulette Turner


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


Re: Help suggestions please #dna

Max Heffler
 

Many features free at:

Family Tree DNA

Living DNA

Geneanet

 

Subscription:

Yourdna.family

 

Max Heffler

Houston, TX

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of mandy.molava via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 2:09 PM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Help suggestions please #dna

 

I'm currently using Ancestry, My Heritage and also GEDmatch as a comparison site, can anyone suggest any others, please? I love the tools on GEDmatch and comparing the Ancient DNA, but match-wise I don't appear to be finding matches above 55cm and largest segment 19.5, I'm gathering not everybody knows about this one? How does everybody get on with this one?

Mandy Molava
Researching Belarus, Brest, Hungary Galacia


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)

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