Date   

(US) Final Rule on Certification for Access to Death Master File #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On July 1, 2016 the US Department of Commerce, National Technical
Information Service (NTIS) published the final rule on Certification for
Access to the Death Master File(DMF) within three years of the person's
death. It may be read at:
https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-06-01/pdf/2016-12479.pdf. The rule
becomes effective November 28, 2016.

An interim final rule was published March 26, 2014-just over 26 months ago.
On December 30, 2014, NTIS published the proposed rule months ago. The
Bi-Partisan Budget Act of 2013 was signed into law on December 26, 2013 the
law that established the changes in access to the DMF also known as the
Social Security Death Index . Between those time periods, there was a public
meeting March 4, 2014 where the genealogical community testified, and
submitted written statements regarding the interim final rule, Limited
Access Death Master File and submitted statements regarding the proposed
final rule.

The final rule did not modify the provisions >from the proposed rule and all
of the genealogical concerns are still there. The rationale for not
accepting these and other interest groups' concerns is addressed in the
beginning pages of the final rule.

To read more about this and the archives on the interim rules, see the IAJGS
Records Access Alert archives Alert Archives at:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/ You must be
a registered subscriber to access the archives. To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
genealogical organization you have your affiliation You will receive an
email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be
finalized.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) Final Rule on Certification for Access to Death Master File #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On July 1, 2016 the US Department of Commerce, National Technical
Information Service (NTIS) published the final rule on Certification for
Access to the Death Master File(DMF) within three years of the person's
death. It may be read at:
https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-06-01/pdf/2016-12479.pdf. The rule
becomes effective November 28, 2016.

An interim final rule was published March 26, 2014-just over 26 months ago.
On December 30, 2014, NTIS published the proposed rule months ago. The
Bi-Partisan Budget Act of 2013 was signed into law on December 26, 2013 the
law that established the changes in access to the DMF also known as the
Social Security Death Index . Between those time periods, there was a public
meeting March 4, 2014 where the genealogical community testified, and
submitted written statements regarding the interim final rule, Limited
Access Death Master File and submitted statements regarding the proposed
final rule.

The final rule did not modify the provisions >from the proposed rule and all
of the genealogical concerns are still there. The rationale for not
accepting these and other interest groups' concerns is addressed in the
beginning pages of the final rule.

To read more about this and the archives on the interim rules, see the IAJGS
Records Access Alert archives Alert Archives at:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/ You must be
a registered subscriber to access the archives. To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
genealogical organization you have your affiliation You will receive an
email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be
finalized.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


House ownership records - Kaunas city, 1840s/1850s #lithuania

Jeremy Schuman
 

Does anyone know what details are contained in house ownership records for
the city of Kaunas in the 1840s / 1850s?

My great grandfather changed his name >from Shuval to Schuman when he
migrated >from Kaunas to London in the 1880s. I can trace his ancestry back
to his grandfather Itsko Shuval who was born in about 1800. Itsko's
father's name was Movsha but I don't know whether Movsha ever used the
surname Shuval.

There were a large number of Shuvals in Kaunas in the 19th century. Thanks
to the many surviving Kaunas Revision Lists, I have managed to construct a
family tree linking together all of these Shuvals EXCEPT for my ancestor
Itsko Shuval. There is no obvious way that he can be fitted into the tree
on his paternal side.

The only connection I can find between Itsko Shuval and the other Shuvals
(other than their common surname) is in the 1855 Real Estate Owners records.
In that year, Itsko is described as the owner of house no 130 in Kaunas,
and so is Yankel Shuval (b c 1824), son of Shachne. If these two Shuvals
were both owners of the same house, then I assume there must have been
some family connection, but the only possible connection I can imagine
is through marriage.

Records indicate that Itsko's wife was called Rochel, and I can see that
Yankel had a sister called Rochel (bc 1804) at the time of the 1816
Revision List. My current theory is that Itsko, born before surnames
were formally adopted by the Jewish population, may have assumed the
surname Shuval when he married Rochel Shuval. Was it common for a man
to assume his wife's surname on marriage if he didn't have one himself?
And are there any other home ownership records (or perhaps inheritance
papers) which might shed any light on this? One possibility is that
Shachne Shuval may have left his house to his son Yankel and to his
(I assume) son-in-law Itsko when he died in about 1849, but how do I
prove this?

Any ideas would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,

Jeremy Schuman,
London,
England


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania House ownership records - Kaunas city, 1840s/1850s #lithuania

Jeremy Schuman
 

Does anyone know what details are contained in house ownership records for
the city of Kaunas in the 1840s / 1850s?

My great grandfather changed his name >from Shuval to Schuman when he
migrated >from Kaunas to London in the 1880s. I can trace his ancestry back
to his grandfather Itsko Shuval who was born in about 1800. Itsko's
father's name was Movsha but I don't know whether Movsha ever used the
surname Shuval.

There were a large number of Shuvals in Kaunas in the 19th century. Thanks
to the many surviving Kaunas Revision Lists, I have managed to construct a
family tree linking together all of these Shuvals EXCEPT for my ancestor
Itsko Shuval. There is no obvious way that he can be fitted into the tree
on his paternal side.

The only connection I can find between Itsko Shuval and the other Shuvals
(other than their common surname) is in the 1855 Real Estate Owners records.
In that year, Itsko is described as the owner of house no 130 in Kaunas,
and so is Yankel Shuval (b c 1824), son of Shachne. If these two Shuvals
were both owners of the same house, then I assume there must have been
some family connection, but the only possible connection I can imagine
is through marriage.

Records indicate that Itsko's wife was called Rochel, and I can see that
Yankel had a sister called Rochel (bc 1804) at the time of the 1816
Revision List. My current theory is that Itsko, born before surnames
were formally adopted by the Jewish population, may have assumed the
surname Shuval when he married Rochel Shuval. Was it common for a man
to assume his wife's surname on marriage if he didn't have one himself?
And are there any other home ownership records (or perhaps inheritance
papers) which might shed any light on this? One possibility is that
Shachne Shuval may have left his house to his son Yankel and to his
(I assume) son-in-law Itsko when he died in about 1849, but how do I
prove this?

Any ideas would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,

Jeremy Schuman,
London,
England


Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #poland

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history
within the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began
as a seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had
signed my estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago
became a journey of discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There,
I heard Eva's stories of survival during the Nazi occupation of Budapest
in 1944, where she fought in the resistance, saved other Jews, knew
Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains
of loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details
of my family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605


JRI Poland #Poland Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #poland

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history
within the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began
as a seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had
signed my estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago
became a journey of discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There,
I heard Eva's stories of survival during the Nazi occupation of Budapest
in 1944, where she fought in the resistance, saved other Jews, knew
Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains
of loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details
of my family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605


Family numbers #galicia

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).

I would appreciate any answers which would shed some light on the topic,

Henryk Gruder,
Ottawa, Canada


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Family numbers #galicia

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).

I would appreciate any answers which would shed some light on the topic,

Henryk Gruder,
Ottawa, Canada


Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Early 1880's Italian Records Found On-Line- free access #general

Lesley K. Cafarelli
 

On 2 June 2016, Ellen Barbieri updated the data about the Italian Archives
website Antenati that she posted originally in February 2015. The link to
the site is www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it.

Ellen wrote:

"Haven't checked this site in a year. They now have 48,443,687 images from
44 State Archives in Italy as of March 2016. Ex. I looked at Province of
Bari, town: Palo del Colle. Divided into sections so click all of them.
Napoleanic has 1806-1815; Restaurazione has intermittent years B. 1823-44, M
& D 1816-60; Civile has all 1861-1900. I also Goggled "palo del colle" & got
a direct link to records on Mormon site: Family Search. Would be helpful to
do for other towns."

I do a lot of research in Italian records and am a frequent user of the
Antenati website. I've been waiting eagerly for the records >from the
province of Matera in southern Italy to come online, since microfilms are
expensive if you need many of them; each Matera province film has all the
towns, but only one or two years of records >from an individual town. I've
also found that some local LDS Family History Centers are focusing on
computer users and not keeping microfilm viewers in good repair, and since
you can't transfer microfilms >from one FHC to another once rented, and I
have about 50 on permanent loan, this can be frustrating. FamilySearch has
some Italian records, mostly the court (Tribunale) record collections from
1866 and later, as does Ancestry. FamilySearch also has some of the
provincial records that are on Antenati, but they are accessible only >from a
Family History Center connected to an LDS church, not at FHCs that are
public libraries, universities, or places like the Minnesota History Center.

Joel Cole, who manages the Italian records digitizing project for
FamilySearch and Antenati, recently shared some information about the
process of getting records online in a discussion in the Italian Genealogy
group on Facebook. He explained that FamilySearch creates the digital
records and then sends them to Antenati, not vice versa. He also wrote that
the goal is to get all the state archives online within the next few years
and said, "All the records that were acquired >from State archives in Italy
are first published on the Antenati website and then after a few weeks on
FS. Records that come >from Tribunali and Diocesis (sic) are just published on FS."

Researchers should also keep in mind that many Italian and other record
collections on FamilySearch are not yet indexed, so you can't search the
database for specific names, dates, or places. You can browse them, however.
One way to find them is to click Search, then click on the map at the upper
right of your screen, and then scroll the menu that pops up for whatever
country or state you are searching. A new page will open with the list of
collections that include that locality. The browsable collections are at the
bottom of the list.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Early 1880's Italian Records Found On-Line- free access #general

Lesley K. Cafarelli
 

On 2 June 2016, Ellen Barbieri updated the data about the Italian Archives
website Antenati that she posted originally in February 2015. The link to
the site is www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it.

Ellen wrote:

"Haven't checked this site in a year. They now have 48,443,687 images from
44 State Archives in Italy as of March 2016. Ex. I looked at Province of
Bari, town: Palo del Colle. Divided into sections so click all of them.
Napoleanic has 1806-1815; Restaurazione has intermittent years B. 1823-44, M
& D 1816-60; Civile has all 1861-1900. I also Goggled "palo del colle" & got
a direct link to records on Mormon site: Family Search. Would be helpful to
do for other towns."

I do a lot of research in Italian records and am a frequent user of the
Antenati website. I've been waiting eagerly for the records >from the
province of Matera in southern Italy to come online, since microfilms are
expensive if you need many of them; each Matera province film has all the
towns, but only one or two years of records >from an individual town. I've
also found that some local LDS Family History Centers are focusing on
computer users and not keeping microfilm viewers in good repair, and since
you can't transfer microfilms >from one FHC to another once rented, and I
have about 50 on permanent loan, this can be frustrating. FamilySearch has
some Italian records, mostly the court (Tribunale) record collections from
1866 and later, as does Ancestry. FamilySearch also has some of the
provincial records that are on Antenati, but they are accessible only >from a
Family History Center connected to an LDS church, not at FHCs that are
public libraries, universities, or places like the Minnesota History Center.

Joel Cole, who manages the Italian records digitizing project for
FamilySearch and Antenati, recently shared some information about the
process of getting records online in a discussion in the Italian Genealogy
group on Facebook. He explained that FamilySearch creates the digital
records and then sends them to Antenati, not vice versa. He also wrote that
the goal is to get all the state archives online within the next few years
and said, "All the records that were acquired >from State archives in Italy
are first published on the Antenati website and then after a few weeks on
FS. Records that come >from Tribunali and Diocesis (sic) are just published on FS."

Researchers should also keep in mind that many Italian and other record
collections on FamilySearch are not yet indexed, so you can't search the
database for specific names, dates, or places. You can browse them, however.
One way to find them is to click Search, then click on the map at the upper
right of your screen, and then scroll the menu that pops up for whatever
country or state you are searching. A new page will open with the list of
collections that include that locality. The browsable collections are at the
bottom of the list.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN, USA


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page. #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from "Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of
Antopol, Belarus. In addition to the translation in the online JewishGen Yizkor
book collection (http://bit.ly/1t1RHXF), it is also available for purchase in
published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project (http://bit.ly/1t1RmUL).

The excerpt is titled "The Murder of Yonah the Miller" (http://bit.ly/25BkBig)
which the author, A. Slonimski says occurred in 1908. It reads very much like it
could be a plot of a TV crime drama.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1108936165795204:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page. #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from "Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of
Antopol, Belarus. In addition to the translation in the online JewishGen Yizkor
book collection (http://bit.ly/1t1RHXF), it is also available for purchase in
published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project (http://bit.ly/1t1RmUL).

The excerpt is titled "The Murder of Yonah the Miller" (http://bit.ly/25BkBig)
which the author, A. Slonimski says occurred in 1908. It reads very much like it
could be a plot of a TV crime drama.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1108936165795204:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #ukraine

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history within
the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began as a
seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had signed my
estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago became a journey of
discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There, I heard Eva's stories of survival
during the Nazi occupation of Budapest in 1944, where she fought in the
resistance, saved other Jews, knew Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared
for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains of
loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details of my
family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605

Moderator's Note: JewishGen guidelines allow a *one time only commercial mention* for genealogically
relevant books, software, web sites, and tours.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #ukraine

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history within
the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began as a
seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had signed my
estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago became a journey of
discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There, I heard Eva's stories of survival
during the Nazi occupation of Budapest in 1944, where she fought in the
resistance, saved other Jews, knew Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared
for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains of
loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details of my
family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605

Moderator's Note: JewishGen guidelines allow a *one time only commercial mention* for genealogically
relevant books, software, web sites, and tours.


Re: Family numbers #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Henryk,

As I understand the system, when the numbering system was created,
there were a small number of Jews living in Lemberg due to residential
restrictions. So, the original book, which was like a modern student bound
notebook, had men, the heads of households listed. I copied lots of pages
and showed the material to a man who could read the Fractur and
interpret what must have been the system within. His interpretation was
that, over time, as men married into the original families, there had to be a
modification of the system. I didn't have the skills to study the matter in
depth. It seemed that, at the beginning, anyway, new household
formations were more easily traceable in the book but, over time, it was
impossible to pursue the strategy of linking households. And, of course,
this all presumed that couples were married under civil law since they
wouldn't have been considered a legitimate household without the civil
marriage.

My take was that, at the beginning, perhaps no one was thinking long
term about what would happen to the numbering system. and I'm
thinking that it must have been a nightmare to keep track of things
without the help of a computer!!! To be clear, there were other purposes
to the numbers than taxation by the Jewish community. All members of
the community in good standing were eligible to vote for representatives
in Jewish community elections and the Jewish community was
responsible for tracking members for purposes of military registration.
Taxes were used to pay for Jewish communal buildings, staff and eligible
organizations, schools, etc. The 12 elected officials were very important.
If you look at certain types of official documents, you will generally see
up to 12 men listed at the end.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...> wrote:

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).....


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Family numbers #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Henryk,

As I understand the system, when the numbering system was created,
there were a small number of Jews living in Lemberg due to residential
restrictions. So, the original book, which was like a modern student bound
notebook, had men, the heads of households listed. I copied lots of pages
and showed the material to a man who could read the Fractur and
interpret what must have been the system within. His interpretation was
that, over time, as men married into the original families, there had to be a
modification of the system. I didn't have the skills to study the matter in
depth. It seemed that, at the beginning, anyway, new household
formations were more easily traceable in the book but, over time, it was
impossible to pursue the strategy of linking households. And, of course,
this all presumed that couples were married under civil law since they
wouldn't have been considered a legitimate household without the civil
marriage.

My take was that, at the beginning, perhaps no one was thinking long
term about what would happen to the numbering system. and I'm
thinking that it must have been a nightmare to keep track of things
without the help of a computer!!! To be clear, there were other purposes
to the numbers than taxation by the Jewish community. All members of
the community in good standing were eligible to vote for representatives
in Jewish community elections and the Jewish community was
responsible for tracking members for purposes of military registration.
Taxes were used to pay for Jewish communal buildings, staff and eligible
organizations, schools, etc. The 12 elected officials were very important.
If you look at certain types of official documents, you will generally see
up to 12 men listed at the end.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...> wrote:

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).....

86961 - 86980 of 675067