Date   

Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Early 1880's Italian Records Found On-Line- free access #general

Lesley K. Cafarelli
 

On 2 June 2016, Ellen Barbieri updated the data about the Italian Archives
website Antenati that she posted originally in February 2015. The link to
the site is www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it.

Ellen wrote:

"Haven't checked this site in a year. They now have 48,443,687 images from
44 State Archives in Italy as of March 2016. Ex. I looked at Province of
Bari, town: Palo del Colle. Divided into sections so click all of them.
Napoleanic has 1806-1815; Restaurazione has intermittent years B. 1823-44, M
& D 1816-60; Civile has all 1861-1900. I also Goggled "palo del colle" & got
a direct link to records on Mormon site: Family Search. Would be helpful to
do for other towns."

I do a lot of research in Italian records and am a frequent user of the
Antenati website. I've been waiting eagerly for the records >from the
province of Matera in southern Italy to come online, since microfilms are
expensive if you need many of them; each Matera province film has all the
towns, but only one or two years of records >from an individual town. I've
also found that some local LDS Family History Centers are focusing on
computer users and not keeping microfilm viewers in good repair, and since
you can't transfer microfilms >from one FHC to another once rented, and I
have about 50 on permanent loan, this can be frustrating. FamilySearch has
some Italian records, mostly the court (Tribunale) record collections from
1866 and later, as does Ancestry. FamilySearch also has some of the
provincial records that are on Antenati, but they are accessible only >from a
Family History Center connected to an LDS church, not at FHCs that are
public libraries, universities, or places like the Minnesota History Center.

Joel Cole, who manages the Italian records digitizing project for
FamilySearch and Antenati, recently shared some information about the
process of getting records online in a discussion in the Italian Genealogy
group on Facebook. He explained that FamilySearch creates the digital
records and then sends them to Antenati, not vice versa. He also wrote that
the goal is to get all the state archives online within the next few years
and said, "All the records that were acquired >from State archives in Italy
are first published on the Antenati website and then after a few weeks on
FS. Records that come >from Tribunali and Diocesis (sic) are just published on FS."

Researchers should also keep in mind that many Italian and other record
collections on FamilySearch are not yet indexed, so you can't search the
database for specific names, dates, or places. You can browse them, however.
One way to find them is to click Search, then click on the map at the upper
right of your screen, and then scroll the menu that pops up for whatever
country or state you are searching. A new page will open with the list of
collections that include that locality. The browsable collections are at the
bottom of the list.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Early 1880's Italian Records Found On-Line- free access #general

Lesley K. Cafarelli
 

On 2 June 2016, Ellen Barbieri updated the data about the Italian Archives
website Antenati that she posted originally in February 2015. The link to
the site is www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it.

Ellen wrote:

"Haven't checked this site in a year. They now have 48,443,687 images from
44 State Archives in Italy as of March 2016. Ex. I looked at Province of
Bari, town: Palo del Colle. Divided into sections so click all of them.
Napoleanic has 1806-1815; Restaurazione has intermittent years B. 1823-44, M
& D 1816-60; Civile has all 1861-1900. I also Goggled "palo del colle" & got
a direct link to records on Mormon site: Family Search. Would be helpful to
do for other towns."

I do a lot of research in Italian records and am a frequent user of the
Antenati website. I've been waiting eagerly for the records >from the
province of Matera in southern Italy to come online, since microfilms are
expensive if you need many of them; each Matera province film has all the
towns, but only one or two years of records >from an individual town. I've
also found that some local LDS Family History Centers are focusing on
computer users and not keeping microfilm viewers in good repair, and since
you can't transfer microfilms >from one FHC to another once rented, and I
have about 50 on permanent loan, this can be frustrating. FamilySearch has
some Italian records, mostly the court (Tribunale) record collections from
1866 and later, as does Ancestry. FamilySearch also has some of the
provincial records that are on Antenati, but they are accessible only >from a
Family History Center connected to an LDS church, not at FHCs that are
public libraries, universities, or places like the Minnesota History Center.

Joel Cole, who manages the Italian records digitizing project for
FamilySearch and Antenati, recently shared some information about the
process of getting records online in a discussion in the Italian Genealogy
group on Facebook. He explained that FamilySearch creates the digital
records and then sends them to Antenati, not vice versa. He also wrote that
the goal is to get all the state archives online within the next few years
and said, "All the records that were acquired >from State archives in Italy
are first published on the Antenati website and then after a few weeks on
FS. Records that come >from Tribunali and Diocesis (sic) are just published on FS."

Researchers should also keep in mind that many Italian and other record
collections on FamilySearch are not yet indexed, so you can't search the
database for specific names, dates, or places. You can browse them, however.
One way to find them is to click Search, then click on the map at the upper
right of your screen, and then scroll the menu that pops up for whatever
country or state you are searching. A new page will open with the list of
collections that include that locality. The browsable collections are at the
bottom of the list.

Lesley K. Cafarelli
Minneapolis, MN, USA


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page. #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from "Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of
Antopol, Belarus. In addition to the translation in the online JewishGen Yizkor
book collection (http://bit.ly/1t1RHXF), it is also available for purchase in
published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project (http://bit.ly/1t1RmUL).

The excerpt is titled "The Murder of Yonah the Miller" (http://bit.ly/25BkBig)
which the author, A. Slonimski says occurred in 1908. It reads very much like it
could be a plot of a TV crime drama.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1108936165795204:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page. #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from "Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of
Antopol, Belarus. In addition to the translation in the online JewishGen Yizkor
book collection (http://bit.ly/1t1RHXF), it is also available for purchase in
published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project (http://bit.ly/1t1RmUL).

The excerpt is titled "The Murder of Yonah the Miller" (http://bit.ly/25BkBig)
which the author, A. Slonimski says occurred in 1908. It reads very much like it
could be a plot of a TV crime drama.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1108936165795204:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #ukraine

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history within
the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began as a
seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had signed my
estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago became a journey of
discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There, I heard Eva's stories of survival
during the Nazi occupation of Budapest in 1944, where she fought in the
resistance, saved other Jews, knew Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared
for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains of
loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details of my
family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605

Moderator's Note: JewishGen guidelines allow a *one time only commercial mention* for genealogically
relevant books, software, web sites, and tours.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical Journey - new book #ukraine

Susan J. Gordon
 

Mysteries in my family's past prodded me to delve into WWII and Holocaust
history, with valuable assistance >from JewishGen databases and members, too.
Soon, my investigations led me through a side door into the past, where
family history merged with world history.

Part memoir, part detective story, Because of Eva: A Jewish Genealogical
Journey (Syracuse U Press) is an intimate tale of one woman's history within
the epic sweep of world events in the 20th century. What began as a
seemingly simple search for "Eva," the elderly relative who had signed my
estranged grandfather Aaron's death certificate long ago became a journey of
discovery after I found her in Tel Aviv. There, I heard Eva's stories of survival
during the Nazi occupation of Budapest in 1944, where she fought in the
resistance, saved other Jews, knew Raoul Wallenberg, and subsequently cared
for Aaron in his final years.

Eventually, I would fly to Budapest to walk Eva's streets in and out of the
former Jewish ghetto, and confirm her stories. I also visited my ancestral
towns Zbaraz, Skalat, Tarnopol in Ukraine, and Czernowitz in Bukovina to
bear witness to the slaughter of entire populations of Jews. Amid remains of
loss and destruction in Aaron's hometown, Zbaraz, I learned details of my
family's life before relatives came to America.

Susan J. Gordon
White Plains NY 10605

Moderator's Note: JewishGen guidelines allow a *one time only commercial mention* for genealogically
relevant books, software, web sites, and tours.


Re: Family numbers #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Henryk,

As I understand the system, when the numbering system was created,
there were a small number of Jews living in Lemberg due to residential
restrictions. So, the original book, which was like a modern student bound
notebook, had men, the heads of households listed. I copied lots of pages
and showed the material to a man who could read the Fractur and
interpret what must have been the system within. His interpretation was
that, over time, as men married into the original families, there had to be a
modification of the system. I didn't have the skills to study the matter in
depth. It seemed that, at the beginning, anyway, new household
formations were more easily traceable in the book but, over time, it was
impossible to pursue the strategy of linking households. And, of course,
this all presumed that couples were married under civil law since they
wouldn't have been considered a legitimate household without the civil
marriage.

My take was that, at the beginning, perhaps no one was thinking long
term about what would happen to the numbering system. and I'm
thinking that it must have been a nightmare to keep track of things
without the help of a computer!!! To be clear, there were other purposes
to the numbers than taxation by the Jewish community. All members of
the community in good standing were eligible to vote for representatives
in Jewish community elections and the Jewish community was
responsible for tracking members for purposes of military registration.
Taxes were used to pay for Jewish communal buildings, staff and eligible
organizations, schools, etc. The 12 elected officials were very important.
If you look at certain types of official documents, you will generally see
up to 12 men listed at the end.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...> wrote:

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).....


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Family numbers #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Henryk,

As I understand the system, when the numbering system was created,
there were a small number of Jews living in Lemberg due to residential
restrictions. So, the original book, which was like a modern student bound
notebook, had men, the heads of households listed. I copied lots of pages
and showed the material to a man who could read the Fractur and
interpret what must have been the system within. His interpretation was
that, over time, as men married into the original families, there had to be a
modification of the system. I didn't have the skills to study the matter in
depth. It seemed that, at the beginning, anyway, new household
formations were more easily traceable in the book but, over time, it was
impossible to pursue the strategy of linking households. And, of course,
this all presumed that couples were married under civil law since they
wouldn't have been considered a legitimate household without the civil
marriage.

My take was that, at the beginning, perhaps no one was thinking long
term about what would happen to the numbering system. and I'm
thinking that it must have been a nightmare to keep track of things
without the help of a computer!!! To be clear, there were other purposes
to the numbers than taxation by the Jewish community. All members of
the community in good standing were eligible to vote for representatives
in Jewish community elections and the Jewish community was
responsible for tracking members for purposes of military registration.
Taxes were used to pay for Jewish communal buildings, staff and eligible
organizations, schools, etc. The 12 elected officials were very important.
If you look at certain types of official documents, you will generally see
up to 12 men listed at the end.

Suzan Wynne, author
The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia: 1772-1918


Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...> wrote:

Digitized Lemberg Records, brought by Edward Rueda in Galicia Digest,
May 17, gives a very important evidence of Lvov/ Lemberg family names,
however this document creates as many questions as it answers:

1. Is a family number unique? That is what I thought, but in few cases I
have found two different (unrelated, as far as I know) families recorded in
the same page, which means, that they would get the same number. And
according to my understanding, this evidence is created for the purpose
of taxation, so two families would pay a common tax?

2. What is the definition of a family, according to this document? A couple
with children? Do the grandchildren belong to the same number? When is
a family "born"? in the moment of marriage registration?

3. If a person married, did he / she lose the original family number and
gets the new one?

4. When, and how is the family record created / updated?

Answering all those questions could significantly help distinguish between
multiple persons of the same name (not rare in case of Jewish families XIX
century).....


Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Bessarabia SIG Updates for the month of May, 2016 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May 2016 for Bessarabia SIG. It was a
great month for new additions, projects.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our web site.

== Jewish Cemeteries. Updates:
-- Update the list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia and Moldova. We have
now 38 cemeteries indexed and/or photographed with total of 40,921 records.
See all the details, with links to Cemetery reports, and lists of Unknown
Graves.

-- Falesti New Jewish Cemetery. 97 records with 88 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Please see the overview, maps, photos, and more at
Falesti New Cemetery Report.

-- Marculesti Jewish Cemetery. 208 records with 204 photographs are sent to
JewishGen /JOWBR. Also there are 484! photos of unknown graves.. Please see
the overview, maps, photos, access to 484 photos of Unknown graves and more
at Marculesti Cemetery Report.

If someone would like to get a whole set of records for a town, for the
donation of $100 to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project you will get the
spreadsheet in advance and also if you find your ancestors, I am going to
send you photos of the tombstone if available.

== Bessarabia Databases. Updates:
Revision List Project update: our team was continuing working on Revisions
for different towns. Another set of Kishinev 1859 located at different
microfilm was found, and that is more than 3000 records. It will be ready
by end of June when all the records will be submitted to JewishGen.

If anyone wants to get a full set of a records for a town, that is possible
with a donation of $100 to Bessarabia SIG General fund. There are new sets
of records found among revision records: petitions, certificates, guarantor
letters, etc. I will write a special message about it.

== KehilaLinks website
Tarutino website was completed. You still can contribute to the website
with stories, photos, documents, etc.

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Translation Request - Romanian? #bessarabia

Stew Cogan <stewcogan@...>
 

Greetings:

I've posted a photograph and the writing on the reverse side of the photograph on ViewMate. I believe
but am not sure that the writing is in Romanian. I would like a translation of the writing.

The photograph is at ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46796

The writing on the reverse side of the photograph is at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46797

I would like to have all the information possible >from the writing, and am most interested in the
names. If it is possible to match up the names with the people identified in the photograph, that
would be very helpful.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you in advance for any help you can offer.

Stew Cogan
Issaquah, Washington

Researching COGAN/COHEN, FOX/FOKSHANSKY, and KRAMER/KREMER in Soroca, Bessarabia,
MATTOS/MATOS and SOLOMON in Bacau, Romania and in Israel, NEWMAN and JUDENHERZ in
Lodz, Poland, and WEISS and JACUBOVITZ in Bilke, Hungary.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Translation Request - Romanian? #bessarabia

Stew Cogan <stewcogan@...>
 

Greetings:

I've posted a photograph and the writing on the reverse side of the photograph on ViewMate. I believe
but am not sure that the writing is in Romanian. I would like a translation of the writing.

The photograph is at ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46796

The writing on the reverse side of the photograph is at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46797

I would like to have all the information possible >from the writing, and am most interested in the
names. If it is possible to match up the names with the people identified in the photograph, that
would be very helpful.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you in advance for any help you can offer.

Stew Cogan
Issaquah, Washington

Researching COGAN/COHEN, FOX/FOKSHANSKY, and KRAMER/KREMER in Soroca, Bessarabia,
MATTOS/MATOS and SOLOMON in Bacau, Romania and in Israel, NEWMAN and JUDENHERZ in
Lodz, Poland, and WEISS and JACUBOVITZ in Bilke, Hungary.


Help Finding Uruguay Cousins--Last Name ROSEN #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I just learned that a branch of the family that I had virtually no
information about had immigrated to Uruguay in the 1930's >from Poland. The
name I am looking for is Dr. Victor ROSEN-and he had a daughter Giselle,
born in Uruguay who immigrated to Israel. Victor's mother was Hinda Rachel
PERLO who married someone in Poland with the surname Rozen. In addition to
Giselle, Victor had a daughter Doris born in Uruguay. I don't have any more
information. Any suggestions on where to research this in Uruguay is very
much appreciated.

Jan Meisels Allen
Agoura Hills, CA

Searching:
SZAPIRA, SOBOTKO, PIATKOWSKA, PERLA, PERLO, ASZ, WAPNIARZ -Lomza ,Poland
GUTFARB --Zambrow, Poland ASZ, Nasielsk, Poland ELION, Suwalki Lithuania
KLAJNMAN, MICHELBERG, SYK, SZLANG, TYKULSKIER Sochaczew, Chorzele, and
Zakroczym Poland
FREJER, IMJAK, WILAMOWSKY, KREPLAK,-Stawiski, Poland
MEISELS, SEGALLA/SIGALL, LIEBERMAN --Brody, Ukraine


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help Finding Uruguay Cousins--Last Name ROSEN #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I just learned that a branch of the family that I had virtually no
information about had immigrated to Uruguay in the 1930's >from Poland. The
name I am looking for is Dr. Victor ROSEN-and he had a daughter Giselle,
born in Uruguay who immigrated to Israel. Victor's mother was Hinda Rachel
PERLO who married someone in Poland with the surname Rozen. In addition to
Giselle, Victor had a daughter Doris born in Uruguay. I don't have any more
information. Any suggestions on where to research this in Uruguay is very
much appreciated.

Jan Meisels Allen
Agoura Hills, CA

Searching:
SZAPIRA, SOBOTKO, PIATKOWSKA, PERLA, PERLO, ASZ, WAPNIARZ -Lomza ,Poland
GUTFARB --Zambrow, Poland ASZ, Nasielsk, Poland ELION, Suwalki Lithuania
KLAJNMAN, MICHELBERG, SYK, SZLANG, TYKULSKIER Sochaczew, Chorzele, and
Zakroczym Poland
FREJER, IMJAK, WILAMOWSKY, KREPLAK,-Stawiski, Poland
MEISELS, SEGALLA/SIGALL, LIEBERMAN --Brody, Ukraine


A question about the name Wofzy #galicia

Yosi Sadeh <yosadeh@...>
 

Hello

My uncle's first name was Wofzy. His last name was MAZES. He lived in
Nadworna, Poland and later in Vienna, Austria until he died there.
probably in 1938.

I wonder if the name Wofzy was a common name. Which kind of name is
it? Polish? German? Jewish?

I could not find any information about this name. I will appreciate any help.

Yosi Sadeh
Herzliya
Israel


New 1878 Statistical Map of Galicia and Bukovina #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

Gesher Galicia has a real treat for you: we've just added an 1878 map
of Galicia and Bukovina to our online Map Room, and it's filled with
interesting statistical details on top of administrative and
communication geography:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-statistical-1878/

Following our research at the Jagiellonian Library in Krakow last
year, and subsequent map acquisitions and discussion, the Library now
permits us to publish selected maps >from their collection in our digital
format, and this first one is a gem! Annotated in both Polish and
German, the map counts industrial and agricultural production for large
and not-so-large towns all across Galicia, >from Chrzanow (and tiny Sol
- yes, that means "salt", but it was noted as a source of mineral water
and as a site with steam sawmill) to Suczawa/Suceava (and little
Monastiora Ruska - a tip to the proximity of the imperial border). We've
taken all 10 sheets of the original map and assembled them into one
zoomable image, so you can take in the details at very high scale.

So, stop reading this note and go spend a few hours enjoying this new map!

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Jagiellonian Library
in Krakow, Poland:
http://www.bj.uj.edu.pl/en_GB/start-en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia A question about the name Wofzy #galicia

Yosi Sadeh <yosadeh@...>
 

Hello

My uncle's first name was Wofzy. His last name was MAZES. He lived in
Nadworna, Poland and later in Vienna, Austria until he died there.
probably in 1938.

I wonder if the name Wofzy was a common name. Which kind of name is
it? Polish? German? Jewish?

I could not find any information about this name. I will appreciate any help.

Yosi Sadeh
Herzliya
Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New 1878 Statistical Map of Galicia and Bukovina #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

Gesher Galicia has a real treat for you: we've just added an 1878 map
of Galicia and Bukovina to our online Map Room, and it's filled with
interesting statistical details on top of administrative and
communication geography:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-statistical-1878/

Following our research at the Jagiellonian Library in Krakow last
year, and subsequent map acquisitions and discussion, the Library now
permits us to publish selected maps >from their collection in our digital
format, and this first one is a gem! Annotated in both Polish and
German, the map counts industrial and agricultural production for large
and not-so-large towns all across Galicia, >from Chrzanow (and tiny Sol
- yes, that means "salt", but it was noted as a source of mineral water
and as a site with steam sawmill) to Suczawa/Suceava (and little
Monastiora Ruska - a tip to the proximity of the imperial border). We've
taken all 10 sheets of the original map and assembled them into one
zoomable image, so you can take in the details at very high scale.

So, stop reading this note and go spend a few hours enjoying this new map!

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Jagiellonian Library
in Krakow, Poland:
http://www.bj.uj.edu.pl/en_GB/start-en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@...