Date   

(US-MASS) State Library of Massachusetts Digitizes WW1 Photos from New England #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The State Library of Massachusetts has digitized 8,400 images of World War I
soldiers. While the photos are primarily >from Massachusetts, there are some
images of soldiers >from surrounding states. In addition to the photographs
many of the files contain biographical information on the soldier. This
collection was donated to the state library in 1935 by the Boston Globe
newspaper. To access the collection go to:
http://archives.lib.state.ma.us/handle/2452/124230 and type in the person's
surname in the search box. I would encourage only surnames in the search
field. When I tried first and last name only people came up with the same
first name. I tried several "Jewish sounding "names for the trial. The
types of data found in the search included in addition to the photo: the
collection, contributor, description notes-including about his being
wounded. Accessing the collection is free.

You can also browse by authors, titles, subjects and issue date.

Thank you to Genealogy in Time Magazine for providing information on this
collection.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US-MASS) State Library of Massachusetts Digitizes WW1 Photos from New England #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The State Library of Massachusetts has digitized 8,400 images of World War I
soldiers. While the photos are primarily >from Massachusetts, there are some
images of soldiers >from surrounding states. In addition to the photographs
many of the files contain biographical information on the soldier. This
collection was donated to the state library in 1935 by the Boston Globe
newspaper. To access the collection go to:
http://archives.lib.state.ma.us/handle/2452/124230 and type in the person's
surname in the search box. I would encourage only surnames in the search
field. When I tried first and last name only people came up with the same
first name. I tried several "Jewish sounding "names for the trial. The
types of data found in the search included in addition to the photo: the
collection, contributor, description notes-including about his being
wounded. Accessing the collection is free.

You can also browse by authors, titles, subjects and issue date.

Thank you to Genealogy in Time Magazine for providing information on this
collection.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Max GOLDMANN, Brisbane Australia #general

Jim Bennett
 

I'm searching for the family of Max GOLDMANN, which originated in Rawitsch,Posen
Province. He may have married Dorothea Rosenberg. Said to have lived in Brisbane,
Australia.

Jim Bennett
Haifa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Max GOLDMANN, Brisbane Australia #general

Jim Bennett
 

I'm searching for the family of Max GOLDMANN, which originated in Rawitsch,Posen
Province. He may have married Dorothea Rosenberg. Said to have lived in Brisbane,
Australia.

Jim Bennett
Haifa


PIHA #general

Bubylu@...
 

I am trying to help a friend search for his family. The family name is PIHA. His
parents came >from Greece, then Italy and finally the Congo. I would so appreciate
any help that you can give to us. Thank you so very much on his behalf as well as my
own.
Lois Segall Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PIHA #general

Bubylu@...
 

I am trying to help a friend search for his family. The family name is PIHA. His
parents came >from Greece, then Italy and finally the Congo. I would so appreciate
any help that you can give to us. Thank you so very much on his behalf as well as my
own.
Lois Segall Friedman


Moving within the Austrian empire in the mid 1800s? #galicia

Martin Wahlen <mwahlen@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am sure that someone has written about this previously and that I am
just not able to use the correct search to find it. I am trying to find out
if my Strasser ancestors moved to Rudki, Rudki, Galicia in the 1830s or
1840s >from another part of the Habsburg empire. I have reasons to
suspect that they may have migrated >from Rajka (Regendorf).
Any pointers for how to proceed would be most appreciated.

Regards Martin


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Moving within the Austrian empire in the mid 1800s? #galicia

Martin Wahlen <mwahlen@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am sure that someone has written about this previously and that I am
just not able to use the correct search to find it. I am trying to find out
if my Strasser ancestors moved to Rudki, Rudki, Galicia in the 1830s or
1840s >from another part of the Habsburg empire. I have reasons to
suspect that they may have migrated >from Rajka (Regendorf).
Any pointers for how to proceed would be most appreciated.

Regards Martin


Holocaust education #general

Genealogykid20 <genealogykid20@...>
 

We have a group for Holocaust education on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/3GsWorldwide And a group for children and grandchildren of
survivors at https://www.facebook.com/groups/genshoah/

Please join us if interested.

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Holocaust education #general

Genealogykid20 <genealogykid20@...>
 

We have a group for Holocaust education on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/3GsWorldwide And a group for children and grandchildren of
survivors at https://www.facebook.com/groups/genshoah/

Please join us if interested.

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Belzec memorial #ukraine

Genealogykid20 <genealogykid20@...>
 

The Belzec memorial group on Facebook has been created at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/387508691407362/. If you're a Facebook
member, you can "request to join".

Also, my website for Belzec is http://chelm.freeyellow.com/belzec.html

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


Belzec memorial #ukraine

Genealogykid20 <genealogykid20@...>
 

The Belzec memorial group on Facebook has been created at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/387508691407362/. If you're a Facebook
member, you can "request to join".

Also, my website for Belzec is http://chelm.freeyellow.com/belzec.html

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


Re: Grading System in Austria #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Amnon wrote:
I have unearthed the 1894 report card for my grandfather Samuel GRONNER, who was
nine years old while attending the public school in Skotschau, Teschen.
I am curious to know the grading system, which appears to range >from 1 to 4. Is it
correct to assume that the higher the number the better the grade?


My answer:

Judging >from my experiences with Austrian schools in the 20th century, the best
mark is 1 (very good), the second best 2 (good), next is 3 (satisfactory) then 4
(sufficient) failing grade is 5 (not sufficient).

So your grandfather did not fail any subject, I hope there are not too many fours.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany, but born in Vienna


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Grading System in Austria #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Amnon wrote:
I have unearthed the 1894 report card for my grandfather Samuel GRONNER, who was
nine years old while attending the public school in Skotschau, Teschen.
I am curious to know the grading system, which appears to range >from 1 to 4. Is it
correct to assume that the higher the number the better the grade?


My answer:

Judging >from my experiences with Austrian schools in the 20th century, the best
mark is 1 (very good), the second best 2 (good), next is 3 (satisfactory) then 4
(sufficient) failing grade is 5 (not sufficient).

So your grandfather did not fail any subject, I hope there are not too many fours.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany, but born in Vienna


RES: useful translation tools #general

tom.venetia@...
 

In my experience, the most accurate translation engine is Google's which you
find at https://translate.google.com

It has several advantages over other similar engines found online:
1.It translates 60+ languages (bidirectional -> English to language and vice-versa)
2. It allows correcting the translated text on the same page where the translation
appears
3. In this process of human corrections the algorithm used by Google "learns" how
to improve the translation
4. It handles several languages that do not use the Latin characters (Greek,
Russian, Hebrew, and Arabic) and offers the corresponding keyboards to type those
languages' characters.
5. If translating an English word the resulting search page will show also some
synonyms and definitions of the word's uses and meanings.

Another very useful resource is the automatic translation of web pages which is
achieved by installing plug-ins in the most popular browsers.
Firefox: Wiktionary and Google Translate 7.1
Internet Explorer: Client for Google Translate
Safari: Translate Safari Extension
These translations are not perfect but good enough to understand what is
written on a foreign page. Usually they work by clicking the mouse's right button.

You will find many free translator apps on the internet. Just type in Google
something like 'text translation software free download.' As mentioned, they are
not as good as the above but still help with quick-and-dirty translations.

Regards
Tom Venetianer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RES: useful translation tools #general

tom.venetia@...
 

In my experience, the most accurate translation engine is Google's which you
find at https://translate.google.com

It has several advantages over other similar engines found online:
1.It translates 60+ languages (bidirectional -> English to language and vice-versa)
2. It allows correcting the translated text on the same page where the translation
appears
3. In this process of human corrections the algorithm used by Google "learns" how
to improve the translation
4. It handles several languages that do not use the Latin characters (Greek,
Russian, Hebrew, and Arabic) and offers the corresponding keyboards to type those
languages' characters.
5. If translating an English word the resulting search page will show also some
synonyms and definitions of the word's uses and meanings.

Another very useful resource is the automatic translation of web pages which is
achieved by installing plug-ins in the most popular browsers.
Firefox: Wiktionary and Google Translate 7.1
Internet Explorer: Client for Google Translate
Safari: Translate Safari Extension
These translations are not perfect but good enough to understand what is
written on a foreign page. Usually they work by clicking the mouse's right button.

You will find many free translator apps on the internet. Just type in Google
something like 'text translation software free download.' As mentioned, they are
not as good as the above but still help with quick-and-dirty translations.

Regards
Tom Venetianer


JGS of Long Island Meeting #general

Jackie Wasserstein
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island invites you to join us at our
Sunday, December 14, meeting.
Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Mid-Island Y JCC 45 Manetto Hill Road Plainview, New York -
www.miyjcc.org_ (http://www.miyjcc.org) .

Topic: JOWBR and the Importance of Burial Records"
Guest Speaker: Nolan Altman
One major help in linking our generations together is patronymics. This lecture
will start with the origin and importance of naming patterns and will then show
you step by step how JewishGen's JOWBR database can be used as the central source
of death records. Next you well learn how to read a Jewish headstone. Finally
there will be a discussion of Jewishgen's Memorial Plaque Project and you'll be
shown how you can contribute to that database.

Nolan Altman is the current President of JGSLI. He is IAJGS Vice President. He is
the V.P. in charge of Data Acquisition for JewishGen. He is coordinator of
Jewishgen's Holocaust databases and JOWBR projects. He has made numerous
presentations and guided computer workshops at various IAJGS Conferences. He
continues to present his "How to Document and Research Your Family History"
seminar to adult and continuing Education classes as well as university Holocaust
and European history classes. He has had several articles published in various
genealogy journals including AVOTAYNU and DOROT.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Our "Mavens" are available at 1:30 PM to
take your genealogy questions.

Jackie Wasserstein
Past President


JGS of Colorado:"Research Around the Pale with JGSCO Experts" - Sunday December. 7th #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

"Research Around the Pale with JGSCO Experts"
Presented by local JGSCO experts:Joe Cahn, Ellen Kowitt, Barry Halpern, Terry Lasky

Location:Jewish Community Center (Perlmutter Room), 350 South Dahlia Street, Denver
Time: 10:00 am until Noon on Sunday, December 7th

This session is open to the public. We welcome newcomers and hope that if you come
but are not yet a member, that you'll strongly consider joining us - which you can
do at the session.

Local JGSCO experts will lead informal roundtable discussions complete with
resource handouts. Come prepared with your questions and maps. This is a great
opportunity to network with fellow members researching the same area.


Joe Cahn - Poland
Ellen Kowitt - Ukraine
Terry Lasky - Bessarabia, Moldova and Romania
Barry Halpern - Baltic states: Lithuania, Lativa, Estonia

Book and Map Swap - When you come to this session, bring along any books or maps
that you no longer use or need, and are willing to donate to others for their use.
We'll have a separate table at the meeting in order to display donated materials.
Perhaps you'll be able to pick up something that is of use to you with your
research!


Joe Cahn
Born in New Brunswick, NJ, Joe lived in New Jersey, New York and California before
moving to Denver 17 years ago. He is a reference librarian at the Denver Public
Library and has been researching his family and various others for more than two
decades. Joe is experienced with resources >from the New York metro area,
Philadelphia, London, Poland,Ukraine, Belarus, Germany, and the Czech Republic.
Although he is fluent in French and Spanish, he notes that he only knows a
smattering of the languages needed for his research. His dream is to learn Russian
and Yiddish when he retires.

Barry Halpern
Barry Halpern has been researching his family history on and off for more than 15
years, though much more intensely during the past several years since he retired
from a 35 year career in the insurance business. Barry and family have had a
long-time interest in Jewish communities in Asia, having lived and worked there for
about 20 years. Now that Barry is no longer a professional, he has become an
amateur at several pursuits: genealogy, photography, astronomy and tennis, in
addition to now being known as an amateur book author. In addition to producing
the JGSCO monthly e-newsletter and serving on the membership committee, Barry is
also a member of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston.

Ellen Kowitt
Ellen Shindelman Kowitt is a past president of the JGS Colorado. A member since
2002, she was previously active with the JGS of Greater Washington since 1994 and
president of that group >from 1999-2001. >from 2002-2005, she served on the board of
directors for the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAGJS), and she has held organizing roles in many of the annual international
conferences on Jewish genealogy since. Ellen led two Jewish genealogy group trips
to Ukraine in the late '90s; she has organized countless volunteer projects - both
locally and virtually - including the translation of gravestones and yizkor
memorial books; she has created Jewish genealogy websites for JGSCO, her family,
and for her landsman on JewishGen; she has published articles about Jewish
genealogy on blogs and in print; and she has not only added hundreds of relatives
to her family tree database, but she's met most in person.


Terry Lasky
Terry Lasky began pursuing his family history in 1988 before anything was on the
Internet. He was employed as a Database Architect by Lockheed-Martin and therefore
had a large amount of knowledge about databases and search techniques. As data
started to become more available online, it was natural for him to use those
techniques to find sites and data that most people were not familiar with. Over the
last 10-15 years, Terry has made numerous presentations on a number of subjects,
most associated with the Internet, search techniques and useful sites. He has also
taught genealogy and mentored numerous people of all levels of knowledge.

Terry Lasky
Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado
talasky@... for more information


JGSCT Program, 12/21/2014 #general

gkreynolds
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut invites you to join us on Sunday,
December 21, 2014 at 1:30 pm at Godfrey Memorial Library to hear the story of
Ralph Parker.


Ralph Parker was born in Germany in 1920 and grew up as a child in a prosperous
family, attending private school classes. That all changed as oppression against
the Jews was instituted in the 1930s. He then used his education and abilities
to become a survivor, living in Germany and then Auschwitz during the war. After
the war he came to America and has lived in Newington for many years.

Godfrey Memorial Library is located at 134 Newfield Street, Middletown.

Free and open to the public.

Gail Reynolds


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Long Island Meeting #general

Jackie Wasserstein
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island invites you to join us at our
Sunday, December 14, meeting.
Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Mid-Island Y JCC 45 Manetto Hill Road Plainview, New York -
www.miyjcc.org_ (http://www.miyjcc.org) .

Topic: JOWBR and the Importance of Burial Records"
Guest Speaker: Nolan Altman
One major help in linking our generations together is patronymics. This lecture
will start with the origin and importance of naming patterns and will then show
you step by step how JewishGen's JOWBR database can be used as the central source
of death records. Next you well learn how to read a Jewish headstone. Finally
there will be a discussion of Jewishgen's Memorial Plaque Project and you'll be
shown how you can contribute to that database.

Nolan Altman is the current President of JGSLI. He is IAJGS Vice President. He is
the V.P. in charge of Data Acquisition for JewishGen. He is coordinator of
Jewishgen's Holocaust databases and JOWBR projects. He has made numerous
presentations and guided computer workshops at various IAJGS Conferences. He
continues to present his "How to Document and Research Your Family History"
seminar to adult and continuing Education classes as well as university Holocaust
and European history classes. He has had several articles published in various
genealogy journals including AVOTAYNU and DOROT.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Our "Mavens" are available at 1:30 PM to
take your genealogy questions.

Jackie Wasserstein
Past President

113721 - 113740 of 671889