Date   

Re: Deportations of Polish-born Jews from Austria/Germany to Zbaszyn #galicia

Ann Rabinowitz
 

In regard to the deportations to Zbaszyn, you may want to read my piece
published on the JewishGen Blog entitled: "The Zbaszyn Tragedy: A Town
Without Piety", and located at the following link:

<http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2009/11/zbaszyn-tragedy-town-without-piety.html>

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Deportations of Polish-born Jews from Austria/Germany to Zbaszyn #galicia

Ann Rabinowitz
 

In regard to the deportations to Zbaszyn, you may want to read my piece
published on the JewishGen Blog entitled: "The Zbaszyn Tragedy: A Town
Without Piety", and located at the following link:

<http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2009/11/zbaszyn-tragedy-town-without-piety.html>

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate file #37699 - Hungarian Translation Request #hungary

Miunthel -
 

Dear Genners:

I have posted a birth record in Hungarian which I would greatly appreciate
help translating. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37699
Thank you very much for your time and assistance.


Sincerely,

Miranda Flint
South Dakota

Moderator: Please use Viewmate to respond.


Re: Images of Some Bialystok, Orla, Sokoly, and Tykocin Vital Records Now Online #poland

indgene@...
 

Mark -

Thanks for posting the information about more PSA scanning. I've looked at
Tykocin and Sokoly scans previously, since these are two shtetls I'm
interested in.

For those of us with little or no Polish language skills, would it be
possible to post somewhere (here on Bialystok forum, or JRI, etc) some more
help with the file folder names PSA is using?

For instance, here is the name of one typical file for Tykocin: Duplikat
aktow czinownika gra danskago sostajanija Tykocinskaga Evrejskago okruga
rodiwszichsja, brakosoczetawszichsja i evrejan b umerszich1873 goda

While I can certainly stumble around and figure out that this particular
folder contains the metrical book for Tykocin in 1873, I've tried using
both Google Translate, poltran.com and my Polish/English dictionary and
found translations of exactly two words out of the 15 words in this
folder title. A lot of these words are used over and over and over
again in the folder names on page after page in PSA's scans.

I'm assuming that some of the words are differentiations of root words,
and I'm also assuming that PSA is using words that are possibly somewhat
peculiar to archival institutions and archival collections, which would
make some of these words fairly impossible to find in a dictionary or
translator that would be more worried about instructing a tourist in
Warsaw how to ask "where is the bathroom?" My dictionary is a used
one >from 1993 and is 712 pages long, but someone wrote in Bozniczego on
the correct page, because the dictionary compilers didn't bother to put
it in. Probably I need a better dictionary.

It would just be nice to be able to tell at a glance what I'm looking at.

Thanks.
Dan Myers


ViewMate file #37699 - Hungarian Translation Request #hungary

Miunthel -
 

Dear Genners:

I have posted a birth record in Hungarian which I would greatly appreciate
help translating. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37699
Thank you very much for your time and assistance.


Sincerely,

Miranda Flint
South Dakota

Moderator: Please use Viewmate to respond.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland RE: Images of Some Bialystok, Orla, Sokoly, and Tykocin Vital Records Now Online #poland

indgene@...
 

Mark -

Thanks for posting the information about more PSA scanning. I've looked at
Tykocin and Sokoly scans previously, since these are two shtetls I'm
interested in.

For those of us with little or no Polish language skills, would it be
possible to post somewhere (here on Bialystok forum, or JRI, etc) some more
help with the file folder names PSA is using?

For instance, here is the name of one typical file for Tykocin: Duplikat
aktow czinownika gra danskago sostajanija Tykocinskaga Evrejskago okruga
rodiwszichsja, brakosoczetawszichsja i evrejan b umerszich1873 goda

While I can certainly stumble around and figure out that this particular
folder contains the metrical book for Tykocin in 1873, I've tried using
both Google Translate, poltran.com and my Polish/English dictionary and
found translations of exactly two words out of the 15 words in this
folder title. A lot of these words are used over and over and over
again in the folder names on page after page in PSA's scans.

I'm assuming that some of the words are differentiations of root words,
and I'm also assuming that PSA is using words that are possibly somewhat
peculiar to archival institutions and archival collections, which would
make some of these words fairly impossible to find in a dictionary or
translator that would be more worried about instructing a tourist in
Warsaw how to ask "where is the bathroom?" My dictionary is a used
one >from 1993 and is 712 pages long, but someone wrote in Bozniczego on
the correct page, because the dictionary compilers didn't bother to put
it in. Probably I need a better dictionary.

It would just be nice to be able to tell at a glance what I'm looking at.

Thanks.
Dan Myers


Hungary SIG #Hungary JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #hungary

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #hungary

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JRI Poland #Poland KENIG, NADLER, and WALDHORN #poland

Ellen Gottfried
 

Annie WALDHORN came to London sometime before 1898, as did her brother
Aaron KENIG. They came >from small towns near Nadworna. Annie married
Solomon NADLER and went to the US in 1899. I am looking for records
from London and Poland for any of these people. I have records from
the United States.

Thanks,

Ellen Gottfried, Plainview, New York


KENIG, NADLER, and WALDHORN #poland

Ellen Gottfried
 

Annie WALDHORN came to London sometime before 1898, as did her brother
Aaron KENIG. They came >from small towns near Nadworna. Annie married
Solomon NADLER and went to the US in 1899. I am looking for records
from London and Poland for any of these people. I have records from
the United States.

Thanks,

Ellen Gottfried, Plainview, New York


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Orel #lithuania

Diane Leigh Davison <diane@...>
 

Thanks for all the insightful private responses to my question!

Diane Leigh Davison


Diane Leigh Davison <diane@...>
 

Thanks for all the insightful private responses to my question!

Diane Leigh Davison


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #southafrica

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #courland #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #southafrica

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #courland #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Corrected Press Release: Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program on Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015 - "Making a Family Tree Coffee Table Book" #general

events@...
 

Zalman Usiskin, who has been interested in genealogy for more than 50
years, will speak on 'Making a Family Tree Coffee Table Book' at the
Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook. In his
presentation, which will begin at 2 p.m., he will explain how to
collect, collate and organize one large family tree into a handsome
volume worthy of calling a 'coffee table book.'
The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information,
visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.
There are many ways of letting people on a family tree know of their
ancestors and cousins. Some people put the information online. Others
have gedcom files that they distribute to interested relatives and
friends.
In this talk, Usiskin, a mathematician, will describe how he created a
book, printed in 2010, that is centered around a tree of descendants of
one couple born in the early 19th century, Velvel and Chaya Rachel
Marinker, great-great-grandparents of the speaker. This presentation
will deal with such questions as how to organize 1,150 direct
descendants and over 2,200 total names in a coherent way, what features
to consider adding to a tree to make it more interesting, how desired
information might be obtained, and how to make the book 'look nice.'
The speaker is not a professional genealogist but has been interested in
the genealogy of the various branches of his family for over 50 years.
In 2002, he spoke to JGSI about writing and distributing a family tree.
His work on the tree, which is the subject of this talk, began in 1975.
The design of this tree book was created and implemented by Shira
Epstein, one of the descendants on the tree.

Submitted by Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Publicity VP
events@...


Corrected Press Release: Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program on Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015 - "Making a Family Tree Coffee Table Book" #general

events@...
 

Zalman Usiskin, who has been interested in genealogy for more than 50
years, will speak on 'Making a Family Tree Coffee Table Book' at the
Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook. In his
presentation, which will begin at 2 p.m., he will explain how to
collect, collate and organize one large family tree into a handsome
volume worthy of calling a 'coffee table book.'
The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information,
visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.
There are many ways of letting people on a family tree know of their
ancestors and cousins. Some people put the information online. Others
have gedcom files that they distribute to interested relatives and
friends.
In this talk, Usiskin, a mathematician, will describe how he created a
book, printed in 2010, that is centered around a tree of descendants of
one couple born in the early 19th century, Velvel and Chaya Rachel
Marinker, great-great-grandparents of the speaker. This presentation
will deal with such questions as how to organize 1,150 direct
descendants and over 2,200 total names in a coherent way, what features
to consider adding to a tree to make it more interesting, how desired
information might be obtained, and how to make the book 'look nice.'
The speaker is not a professional genealogist but has been interested in
the genealogy of the various branches of his family for over 50 years.
In 2002, he spoke to JGSI about writing and distributing a family tree.
His work on the tree, which is the subject of this talk, began in 1975.
The design of this tree book was created and implemented by Shira
Epstein, one of the descendants on the tree.

Submitted by Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Publicity VP
events@...


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #yiddish

bounce-2907608-772983@...
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #yiddish

bounce-2907608-772983@...
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@... .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects