Date   

Re: Jewish relative in 1892 NY Census #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybr26@...>
 

Although the 1892 New York Census for New York City isn't available,
there was a 1890 Police Census for New York City which does. This is
available >from the Municipal Archives, and it is on Ancestry. I
checked Ancestry, and the only person close to Rossett is an Italian
man named Giovanni Rosato. That doesn't mean, however, that your
Joshua isn't there, just that it might take some creative searching
for him, as transcription can be awful. The census pages that I found
for my family (many years ago and on paper) are clearly written, but
some may not be. In addition, details like his approximate age might
help on Ancestry, at least.

"I am trying to locate information >from the 1892 NY State Census. My
grandfather, Joshua ROSETT"

Sally Bruckheimer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish relative in 1892 NY Census #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybr26@...>
 

Although the 1892 New York Census for New York City isn't available,
there was a 1890 Police Census for New York City which does. This is
available >from the Municipal Archives, and it is on Ancestry. I
checked Ancestry, and the only person close to Rossett is an Italian
man named Giovanni Rosato. That doesn't mean, however, that your
Joshua isn't there, just that it might take some creative searching
for him, as transcription can be awful. The census pages that I found
for my family (many years ago and on paper) are clearly written, but
some may not be. In addition, details like his approximate age might
help on Ancestry, at least.

"I am trying to locate information >from the 1892 NY State Census. My
grandfather, Joshua ROSETT"

Sally Bruckheimer


(UK) WW1 1914 Centenary at The Wiener Library. exhibition and conference #general

Saul Issroff
 

The Wiener Library is in central London and is the main centre for
study of Holocaust and genocide in the UK.

A new temporary exhibition marking the centenary of the beginning of
the First World War is opening. As part of the First World War
Centenary Programme led by the Imperial War Museum, the Library is
showing its extensive collections in an exhibition entitled 'The
Kaiser's Jewish Soldiers: Loyalty, Identity, Betrayal'
which will run >from 24 June to 8 October 2014.

Some 100,000 German Jews donned military uniform and approximately
12,000 soldiers died fighting for the German Army between 1914 and
1918. The Holocaust has cast a long shadow over this moment in
history, but for many Jews the experience of the First World War was
not defined by antisemitism, which was also prevalent in other
countries at the time, including Britain, but rather by a profound
sense of commitment to the German fatherland. The exhibition will
explore the lives and legacies of the Jews who served in the German
army through the display of striking photographs, posters, portraits,
postcards, prints, wartime diaries and books.

The Library will also be co-hosting an international conference on the
Jewish Experience of the First World War in partnership with The
Jewish Museum, London and the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at
Sussex University. On the evening of Thursday 12 June there will be a
special lecture on Karl Kraus by Professor Edward Timms of the
University of Sussex and the final day of the conference will be held
at The Wiener Library. www.wienerlibrary.co.uk
29 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DP
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7636 7247
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7436 6428

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) WW1 1914 Centenary at The Wiener Library. exhibition and conference #general

Saul Issroff
 

The Wiener Library is in central London and is the main centre for
study of Holocaust and genocide in the UK.

A new temporary exhibition marking the centenary of the beginning of
the First World War is opening. As part of the First World War
Centenary Programme led by the Imperial War Museum, the Library is
showing its extensive collections in an exhibition entitled 'The
Kaiser's Jewish Soldiers: Loyalty, Identity, Betrayal'
which will run >from 24 June to 8 October 2014.

Some 100,000 German Jews donned military uniform and approximately
12,000 soldiers died fighting for the German Army between 1914 and
1918. The Holocaust has cast a long shadow over this moment in
history, but for many Jews the experience of the First World War was
not defined by antisemitism, which was also prevalent in other
countries at the time, including Britain, but rather by a profound
sense of commitment to the German fatherland. The exhibition will
explore the lives and legacies of the Jews who served in the German
army through the display of striking photographs, posters, portraits,
postcards, prints, wartime diaries and books.

The Library will also be co-hosting an international conference on the
Jewish Experience of the First World War in partnership with The
Jewish Museum, London and the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at
Sussex University. On the evening of Thursday 12 June there will be a
special lecture on Karl Kraus by Professor Edward Timms of the
University of Sussex and the final day of the conference will be held
at The Wiener Library. www.wienerlibrary.co.uk
29 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DP
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7636 7247
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7436 6428

Saul Issroff


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Tiraspol Cemetery... need your help and advice to remove swastikas #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

My tayere Bessarabers, Ukrainers,

Only last Thursday I asked for help, and today, on Monday I have received
the last 12th fixed image.
Now we can complete Tiraspol Cemetery project.

As one of volunteers who tried to work on images said: " Random acts of
Genealogical Kindness keep us all going". Yes, this is absolutely true!

This is amazing and I would consider this effort as a success story, how
people are coming together, spending their time and trying to help on a
Tiraspol Cemetery project. Most probably even do not know where Tiraspol is
located. I tried to reply on all 67 emails I received since Thursday, and
for 5 days I received about 30 images!

Thank you all >from the bottom of my heart! You are terrific.
Congratulations to all of you!

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


-----------------------------------------------------------------

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 9:34 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Tiraspol Cemetery... need your help and advice

Hi All, I need your help and advice.

I am finishing Tiraspol Jewish Cemetery table and photos, and have an issue.

12 tombstones were desecrated with swastikas and SS-signs...
One person is trying to help to remove it >from photos, but it is not
working. The pain is black.

Is anyone have experience with removing these type of things >from photos,
please let me know.
These are current photos, and the photographer tried to remove >from the
monuments and it will need more work and effort.
I will definitely show you a few of these at the Cemetery Final report, but
for the database I think it would be better to remove them.

Looking for your help.

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Tiraspol Cemetery... need your help and advice to remove swastikas #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

My tayere Bessarabers, Ukrainers,

Only last Thursday I asked for help, and today, on Monday I have received
the last 12th fixed image.
Now we can complete Tiraspol Cemetery project.

As one of volunteers who tried to work on images said: " Random acts of
Genealogical Kindness keep us all going". Yes, this is absolutely true!

This is amazing and I would consider this effort as a success story, how
people are coming together, spending their time and trying to help on a
Tiraspol Cemetery project. Most probably even do not know where Tiraspol is
located. I tried to reply on all 67 emails I received since Thursday, and
for 5 days I received about 30 images!

Thank you all >from the bottom of my heart! You are terrific.
Congratulations to all of you!

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


-----------------------------------------------------------------

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 9:34 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Tiraspol Cemetery... need your help and advice

Hi All, I need your help and advice.

I am finishing Tiraspol Jewish Cemetery table and photos, and have an issue.

12 tombstones were desecrated with swastikas and SS-signs...
One person is trying to help to remove it >from photos, but it is not
working. The pain is black.

Is anyone have experience with removing these type of things >from photos,
please let me know.
These are current photos, and the photographer tried to remove >from the
monuments and it will need more work and effort.
I will definitely show you a few of these at the Cemetery Final report, but
for the database I think it would be better to remove them.

Looking for your help.

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yiddish newspapers in Kiev #ukraine

Cheryl Tallan
 

According to family lore my grandfather, Zussman Bossin (or Stoller), wrote
poetry that was published in one of the Yiddish newspaper of Kiev. That
would have been either in the late 1800s or in 1900-1912.

I would like to know the name(s) of the Kievan Yiddish newspaper(s) and if
any of them are available in some form to readers in north America.

Thanks a lot,
Cheryl Tallan
c.tallan@...


Yiddish newspapers in Kiev #ukraine

Cheryl Tallan
 

According to family lore my grandfather, Zussman Bossin (or Stoller), wrote
poetry that was published in one of the Yiddish newspaper of Kiev. That
would have been either in the late 1800s or in 1900-1912.

I would like to know the name(s) of the Kievan Yiddish newspaper(s) and if
any of them are available in some form to readers in north America.

Thanks a lot,
Cheryl Tallan
c.tallan@...


Searching Lost Cousin: FALLIS #belarus

Edward Levine <edxaide@...>
 

My grandparents are >from Grodno. My grandparents names are Simon
Fallis and Esther Schneider. They came to the US in 1904. The
remainder of the family, except for one cousin, perished in the
Holocaust. I am trying to locate this cousin who I visited in Tel
Aviv, Israel, I believe the address was 6 Masaryk Square, in the 60s.
At that time she was married and had two sons. Her maiden name is
FALLIS but I do not know any of the other names. My cousin and her
future husband arrived by small plane >from Grodno to Palestine in the
early 1940s. Any help in locating her or her sons/grandchildren is
greatly appreciated.
MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted to the list. Please
reply privately with family information.

Ed Levine


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching Lost Cousin: FALLIS #belarus

Edward Levine <edxaide@...>
 

My grandparents are >from Grodno. My grandparents names are Simon
Fallis and Esther Schneider. They came to the US in 1904. The
remainder of the family, except for one cousin, perished in the
Holocaust. I am trying to locate this cousin who I visited in Tel
Aviv, Israel, I believe the address was 6 Masaryk Square, in the 60s.
At that time she was married and had two sons. Her maiden name is
FALLIS but I do not know any of the other names. My cousin and her
future husband arrived by small plane >from Grodno to Palestine in the
early 1940s. Any help in locating her or her sons/grandchildren is
greatly appreciated.
MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted to the list. Please
reply privately with family information.

Ed Levine


Trip to Belarus #belarus

Catherine YELNIK <c.yel@...>
 

Hello,

I am going to Minsk and Mozyr in July and hope to go to the archives. I am
interested in any good advice, suggestions of people to meet , places to go
to, a researcher...
If there is something I can do, I'll do my best. Write to me privately.

Best regards,

Catherine Yelnik
France


Belarus SIG #Belarus Trip to Belarus #belarus

Catherine YELNIK <c.yel@...>
 

Hello,

I am going to Minsk and Mozyr in July and hope to go to the archives. I am
interested in any good advice, suggestions of people to meet , places to go
to, a researcher...
If there is something I can do, I'll do my best. Write to me privately.

Best regards,

Catherine Yelnik
France


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #belarus

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #belarus

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Was the Lithuanian-Jewish SCHWEITZER family related to the famous Dr. Albert Schweitzer? #lithuania

Ethan Kent <ewkent@...>
 

Hello.

As has already been said here:

On 08.06.2014 17:24, saweinsteinbsme@... wrote:
Father: ISAAC SCHWEITZER
Mother:JENNIE
Children:

ANNA SCHWEITZER, born 1895, Vilna (now Vilnus); married 12 Feb. 1916
The name Schweitzer means someone >from Switzerland, so it is hardly a
Jewish name, since Jews were not allowed in Switzerland until modern
times.

The famous Dr. Albert Schweitzer was besides being a doctor, a devout
Christian clergyman and a missionary. On the other hand, Jews picked up
surnames in all sorts of ways. To answer your question--extremely
extremely unlikely.

Jules Levin

I don't have much to add to what Mr. Levin has said, but I can also add
(with respect to the unlikelihood of Dr. Schweitzer being related to the
Lithuanian-Jewish Schweitzer's being discussed) that the famous Dr.
Schweitzer was not only just about an exact contemporary (with respect
to birth; Dr. Schweitzer was born in 1875) of the Isaac Schweitzer in
question, but that Dr. Schweitzer was born FAR AWAY >from Vilna and
Lithuania -- in fact in what is now the French region of Alsace (in 1875
newly acquired by the German Empire of the Hohenzollerns) -- and
(according to Wikipedia) Dr. Schweitzer's father was a Protestant minister.

(Also, Dr. Schweitzer's roots in Alsace seem to have been quite
deep/ancient.)

Ethan Kent
New York, NY

(HALPERIN great-grandparents (and grandmother) >from Vilna/Vilnius) ;
PAT/PATT/PATE great-grandparents >from Bialystok; KANTOR great-grandparents
from (I believe) today's Belarus (but >from the "Litvak" cultural area.)
MODERATOR'S NOTE: The original query has been answered conclusively.
Please respond privately with any continued exchange on this issue.


Was the Lithuanian-Jewish SCHWEITZER family related to the famous Dr. Albert Schweitzer? #lithuania

Ethan Kent <ewkent@...>
 

Hello.

As has already been said here:

On 08.06.2014 17:24, saweinsteinbsme@... wrote:
Father: ISAAC SCHWEITZER
Mother:JENNIE
Children:

ANNA SCHWEITZER, born 1895, Vilna (now Vilnus); married 12 Feb. 1916
The name Schweitzer means someone >from Switzerland, so it is hardly a
Jewish name, since Jews were not allowed in Switzerland until modern
times.

The famous Dr. Albert Schweitzer was besides being a doctor, a devout
Christian clergyman and a missionary. On the other hand, Jews picked up
surnames in all sorts of ways. To answer your question--extremely
extremely unlikely.

Jules Levin

I don't have much to add to what Mr. Levin has said, but I can also add
(with respect to the unlikelihood of Dr. Schweitzer being related to the
Lithuanian-Jewish Schweitzer's being discussed) that the famous Dr.
Schweitzer was not only just about an exact contemporary (with respect
to birth; Dr. Schweitzer was born in 1875) of the Isaac Schweitzer in
question, but that Dr. Schweitzer was born FAR AWAY >from Vilna and
Lithuania -- in fact in what is now the French region of Alsace (in 1875
newly acquired by the German Empire of the Hohenzollerns) -- and
(according to Wikipedia) Dr. Schweitzer's father was a Protestant minister.

(Also, Dr. Schweitzer's roots in Alsace seem to have been quite
deep/ancient.)

Ethan Kent
New York, NY

(HALPERIN great-grandparents (and grandmother) >from Vilna/Vilnius) ;
PAT/PATT/PATE great-grandparents >from Bialystok; KANTOR great-grandparents
from (I believe) today's Belarus (but >from the "Litvak" cultural area.)
MODERATOR'S NOTE: The original query has been answered conclusively.
Please respond privately with any continued exchange on this issue.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Vilnius revision lists before 1858 #lithuania

Lisa Grayson <lisa@...>
 

<< The archivists no longer do research and private researchers in
Vilnius are very few in number. The only reason why the Vilnius
revision lists for 1813, 1816, 1834 and 1851 have not been translated
is a lack of funds. >>

Thanks to Howard Margol for offering the above explanation of early
19th-c. Lithuanian records. I am certain that many of us would be
willing to donate to translate the revision lists mentioned above. How
much will be needed to translate, say, the 1834 revision list? (I
checked the LitvakSIG members site and couldn't find a page indicating
the sums required.) Thank you -- and thanks to LitvakSIG for providing
records that helped me break through a brick wall.


Yours sincerely,
Lisa Grayson
Chicago, Illinois USA

Researching: MARUCHES, FINK, ROSENTHAL in Vilna, Moletai, Grodno,
Skidel, Sopotskin, =D6zery, Liverpool; BIRZOVICH/BERKOWITZ in Vilna;
LEVIN in Grodno; HIRSCHBERG in Vilna and Grodno; GOLDMAN in
Danzig/Gdansk; ROSENBLOOM in Vilna and Liverpool; ROSEN and ROSENKRANTZ
in Lodz; BARMON in Lipno and Rypin; WEINER in Berdichev; GOLDBERG in
Berdichev and Kiev

MODERATOR'S NOTE: As a rule, LitvakSIG is not able to estimate the cost
of translating a list, i.e. the 1834 Revision List for a particular
district, before the translation starts. The best thing to do is to go
http://www.litvaksig.org/districtresearch scroll down to the district
in which your town(s) are listed, and write to the District Coordinator.


Re: Vilnius revision lists before 1858 #lithuania

Lisa Grayson <lisa@...>
 

<< The archivists no longer do research and private researchers in
Vilnius are very few in number. The only reason why the Vilnius
revision lists for 1813, 1816, 1834 and 1851 have not been translated
is a lack of funds. >>

Thanks to Howard Margol for offering the above explanation of early
19th-c. Lithuanian records. I am certain that many of us would be
willing to donate to translate the revision lists mentioned above. How
much will be needed to translate, say, the 1834 revision list? (I
checked the LitvakSIG members site and couldn't find a page indicating
the sums required.) Thank you -- and thanks to LitvakSIG for providing
records that helped me break through a brick wall.


Yours sincerely,
Lisa Grayson
Chicago, Illinois USA

Researching: MARUCHES, FINK, ROSENTHAL in Vilna, Moletai, Grodno,
Skidel, Sopotskin, =D6zery, Liverpool; BIRZOVICH/BERKOWITZ in Vilna;
LEVIN in Grodno; HIRSCHBERG in Vilna and Grodno; GOLDMAN in
Danzig/Gdansk; ROSENBLOOM in Vilna and Liverpool; ROSEN and ROSENKRANTZ
in Lodz; BARMON in Lipno and Rypin; WEINER in Berdichev; GOLDBERG in
Berdichev and Kiev

MODERATOR'S NOTE: As a rule, LitvakSIG is not able to estimate the cost
of translating a list, i.e. the 1834 Revision List for a particular
district, before the translation starts. The best thing to do is to go
http://www.litvaksig.org/districtresearch scroll down to the district
in which your town(s) are listed, and write to the District Coordinator.


WWI casualty lists searchable, high-quality images at Upper Austrian Regional Library #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Very clear images of World War I casualty lists for Austria-Hungary
are viewable and full-text searchable on the website of the Upper
Austrian Regional Library. To search the casualty lists, enter your
search term (e.g., surname, surname and given name, surname and town)
at http://digi.landesbibliothek.at/viewer/browse/periodika.verlustliste*/-/1/CURRENTNOSORT/-/.

In the list of search results, click on a thumbnail image to show a
medium-size image with the matching text highlighted. Even larger
images can then be viewed by 1) clicking the full-screen button above
the medium-size image and then using the zoom slider at the top, or 2)
moving the grey slider above the medium-size image to the right to
zoom in. When zoomed in, an image can be clicked-and-dragged to
change the section that is visible.

The search results for these images (generated via OCR) seem to be
(much?) more accurate than those for the same lists at other sites
(e.g., Austrian National Library at
http://anno.onb.ac.at/anno-suche/#searchMode=complex&title=Verlustliste+&resultMode=list&from=1&sort=date+asc
or Kramerius Digital Library at
http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/handle/ABA001/24665809). This might
be because of the superior quality of their images.

The Upper Austrian Regional Library has not yet posted all its lists
online. They have so far posted about 40% of known lists, and are
digitizing more each day, essentially in chronological order from
earliest to latest. It remains to be seen how much their online
collection will ultimately overlap with the others in scope.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland WWI casualty lists searchable, high-quality images at Upper Austrian Regional Library #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Very clear images of World War I casualty lists for Austria-Hungary
are viewable and full-text searchable on the website of the Upper
Austrian Regional Library. To search the casualty lists, enter your
search term (e.g., surname, surname and given name, surname and town)
at http://digi.landesbibliothek.at/viewer/browse/periodika.verlustliste*/-/1/CURRENTNOSORT/-/.

In the list of search results, click on a thumbnail image to show a
medium-size image with the matching text highlighted. Even larger
images can then be viewed by 1) clicking the full-screen button above
the medium-size image and then using the zoom slider at the top, or 2)
moving the grey slider above the medium-size image to the right to
zoom in. When zoomed in, an image can be clicked-and-dragged to
change the section that is visible.

The search results for these images (generated via OCR) seem to be
(much?) more accurate than those for the same lists at other sites
(e.g., Austrian National Library at
http://anno.onb.ac.at/anno-suche/#searchMode=complex&title=Verlustliste+&resultMode=list&from=1&sort=date+asc
or Kramerius Digital Library at
http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/handle/ABA001/24665809). This might
be because of the superior quality of their images.

The Upper Austrian Regional Library has not yet posted all its lists
online. They have so far posted about 40% of known lists, and are
digitizing more each day, essentially in chronological order from
earliest to latest. It remains to be seen how much their online
collection will ultimately overlap with the others in scope.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.