Date   

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #lithuania

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #lithuania

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Need help with some unintelligible names #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

I have some questions about some unclear names and vital record forms. These are on Viewmate and originate in vital records online at Family Search, and I have provided links to the sources.

For the following I have already consulted the GNDB (Given Names Database) on Jewish Gen, www.behindthename.com, Google, etc. The names are for relative born in Hanusfalu (Hanusovce nad Toplou) and may be Hungarian or Hungarian-ized German or Yiddish, etc. The forms are in German, >from mid-19th, but should be familiar for many.

I would that the unknown-named person is the same - or at least if the name is the same - at these first two links.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34163
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34178

This third link is just about an unfamiliar name, "Hiczig":
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34164

All of the other instructions, desires etc. are at the links. Please respond there if possible.

Thank you!

--
Todd Edelman
Los Angeles

Researching:

KUNSTLER, SUSSHOLZ, RODER, WAHRMANN, ROTHMAN, WEISZ, GRUN, EDELMAN and others in Hanusovce nad Toplou and other ares in eastern Slovakia

Moderator: Please use ViewMate to respond.


Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #hungary

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Need help with some unintelligible names #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

I have some questions about some unclear names and vital record forms. These are on Viewmate and originate in vital records online at Family Search, and I have provided links to the sources.

For the following I have already consulted the GNDB (Given Names Database) on Jewish Gen, www.behindthename.com, Google, etc. The names are for relative born in Hanusfalu (Hanusovce nad Toplou) and may be Hungarian or Hungarian-ized German or Yiddish, etc. The forms are in German, >from mid-19th, but should be familiar for many.

I would that the unknown-named person is the same - or at least if the name is the same - at these first two links.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34163
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34178

This third link is just about an unfamiliar name, "Hiczig":
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34164

All of the other instructions, desires etc. are at the links. Please respond there if possible.

Thank you!

--
Todd Edelman
Los Angeles

Researching:

KUNSTLER, SUSSHOLZ, RODER, WAHRMANN, ROTHMAN, WEISZ, GRUN, EDELMAN and others in Hanusovce nad Toplou and other ares in eastern Slovakia

Moderator: Please use ViewMate to respond.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #hungary

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Searching for living relatives of Thomasiusstrasse, Berlin Stolperstein project #germany

Judith Elam
 

In November 2013 I posted a message detailing how a Stolperstein
which I initiated and was laid almost two years ago, was the only
one on the street and sparked a "fire" amongst the residents of
that street to research and honor other victims who had once
lived there too.

I described the wonderful efforts of Oliver GEIGER and other
residents of Thomasiusstrasse in Moabit, Berlin, who have banded
together to organize and pay for the cost of Stolpersteine to be
laid for all of them. They have now found 101 victims, and 65
residents are involved in this unprecedented and moving project.

I have been assisting them to try and locate living relatives of
these victims, and we have found quite a few, some of whom have
already been to Berlin and have been housed in the very building
their relative(s) used to live before deportation. Others will
be arriving for their relative's Stolperstein ceremony.

In all cases, the living relatives have been very moved and
overwhelmed by this project.

The first 39 stones will be laid on August 8th at 12.30 pm,
the next batch in October, and the remainder in March 2015.
After all 101 stones are laid on this short street, it will
literally be plastered with them, and no doubt attract a lot
of attention and emotion. We believe this is the first project
of its kind in Berlin, but hopefully not the last.

We hope that other residents on other streets will be moved
and motivated to follow these people's shining determination
to memorialize every victim who lived on their street.

I am now posting the list of all 101 victims, in the hope that
even more living relatives will be found and more information on
the victims can be obtained.

Please contact me privately at elamj@... if your relative
is on the list. Please forgive the lack of all capital letters for the
surnames - this is how I received the list!

Judith Elam , Kihei, HI elamj@...

Surname First Name Maiden Name

Asch Ellinor
Asch Marta Caminer
Asch Simon
Asch Werner
Badasch Edith Schuber
Bader Hedwig
Birnbaum Jadwiga
Birnbaum Emil Gustav
Birnbaum Ruth
Brenner Paula Nothmann
Caminer Recha=
Cohn Julius
Cohn Margarete Lutze
Ehrlich Berta Meyerhof
Ehrlich Leopold
Falkenstein Joachim
Falkenstein Berta Loewenstein
Giballe Hertha Rothkugel
Giballe Siegfried
Glass Charlotte
Glass Clara Haase
Goldschmidt Lola Flora Koppel
Goldschmidt Joseph
Goldberg Helene Cohn
Goldstein Julie Mendelsohn
Goldstein Dr. Siegbert
Grunwald Heinrich
Grunwald Lucie Aschheim
Herrnberg Dagobert
Herzog Lieschen Lea Lichtenstein
Herzog Max=09
Herzog, Dr.Joseph
Herzog Martha Herzog
Hirsch Stephan=
Hoffmann Margarete Kreitner
Hoffmann Hans
Hoffmann Rosalie Krisch
Holl=E4nder Channa Anna
Holl=E4nder Golda Rachela Rosa
Isaacsohn Julius
Israelski Betty Schragenheim
Jarotschinski Paul
Jarotschinski Pauline Leiser
Karger Georg
Kahn Adolf
Kahn Rosa Glass
Kaufmann Dagobert
Kaufmann Rosa Singer
Klein Sigmund
Koppel Margarete Joachimsohn
Kroner Martha
Kroner Selig
Levy Denny
Levy Hildegard Marcus
Levy Jona
Levy Felix
Levy Louise
Leyde Helena Wertheimer
Leyde Sali
L=F6w Erna (Esther) Rimalt
L=F6w Liane (Lea)
L=F6w Nuchem
L=F6w Wilhelm
Manasse Eva
Marcus Irma Scheinberger
Marcus Kurt
Markus Clara Grund
Mendelsohn Leo
Mendelsohn Martin
Nordon Henriette Cohn
Nordon Berthold
Neumann Willi
Nussbaum Siegmund
Nussbaum Gisela Gessler
Rittler Luise
Rittler Marie Hirsch
Rittler Richard
Rosenthal Charlotte Witt
Rosenthal Martin
Rosenwasser Max Mejer
Rosenwasser Ryfka Regina Ritter
Rosenwasser Elisabeth Levy
Rothkugel Kaete
Schragenheim Babette Mann
Schragenheim Siegfried
Schwabe Gustav Ludwig
Schwabe Margarethe Frankenberg
Seckelson Elsbeth Arendt
Silbermann Martha Bernstein
Silbermann Salomon
Sonnenwirth Farkas
Strauss Else
Strauss Moses
Strauss Anna Sternberg
Voss Liselotte Katz
Voss Werner Willy
Weisstein Lotte Klein
Wiener Julius
Wiener Martha Schachian
Zoegall Kaethe Boehm
Zoegall Peter Julius


German SIG #Germany Searching for living relatives of Thomasiusstrasse, Berlin Stolperstein project #germany

Judith Elam
 

In November 2013 I posted a message detailing how a Stolperstein
which I initiated and was laid almost two years ago, was the only
one on the street and sparked a "fire" amongst the residents of
that street to research and honor other victims who had once
lived there too.

I described the wonderful efforts of Oliver GEIGER and other
residents of Thomasiusstrasse in Moabit, Berlin, who have banded
together to organize and pay for the cost of Stolpersteine to be
laid for all of them. They have now found 101 victims, and 65
residents are involved in this unprecedented and moving project.

I have been assisting them to try and locate living relatives of
these victims, and we have found quite a few, some of whom have
already been to Berlin and have been housed in the very building
their relative(s) used to live before deportation. Others will
be arriving for their relative's Stolperstein ceremony.

In all cases, the living relatives have been very moved and
overwhelmed by this project.

The first 39 stones will be laid on August 8th at 12.30 pm,
the next batch in October, and the remainder in March 2015.
After all 101 stones are laid on this short street, it will
literally be plastered with them, and no doubt attract a lot
of attention and emotion. We believe this is the first project
of its kind in Berlin, but hopefully not the last.

We hope that other residents on other streets will be moved
and motivated to follow these people's shining determination
to memorialize every victim who lived on their street.

I am now posting the list of all 101 victims, in the hope that
even more living relatives will be found and more information on
the victims can be obtained.

Please contact me privately at elamj@... if your relative
is on the list. Please forgive the lack of all capital letters for the
surnames - this is how I received the list!

Judith Elam , Kihei, HI elamj@...

Surname First Name Maiden Name

Asch Ellinor
Asch Marta Caminer
Asch Simon
Asch Werner
Badasch Edith Schuber
Bader Hedwig
Birnbaum Jadwiga
Birnbaum Emil Gustav
Birnbaum Ruth
Brenner Paula Nothmann
Caminer Recha=
Cohn Julius
Cohn Margarete Lutze
Ehrlich Berta Meyerhof
Ehrlich Leopold
Falkenstein Joachim
Falkenstein Berta Loewenstein
Giballe Hertha Rothkugel
Giballe Siegfried
Glass Charlotte
Glass Clara Haase
Goldschmidt Lola Flora Koppel
Goldschmidt Joseph
Goldberg Helene Cohn
Goldstein Julie Mendelsohn
Goldstein Dr. Siegbert
Grunwald Heinrich
Grunwald Lucie Aschheim
Herrnberg Dagobert
Herzog Lieschen Lea Lichtenstein
Herzog Max=09
Herzog, Dr.Joseph
Herzog Martha Herzog
Hirsch Stephan=
Hoffmann Margarete Kreitner
Hoffmann Hans
Hoffmann Rosalie Krisch
Holl=E4nder Channa Anna
Holl=E4nder Golda Rachela Rosa
Isaacsohn Julius
Israelski Betty Schragenheim
Jarotschinski Paul
Jarotschinski Pauline Leiser
Karger Georg
Kahn Adolf
Kahn Rosa Glass
Kaufmann Dagobert
Kaufmann Rosa Singer
Klein Sigmund
Koppel Margarete Joachimsohn
Kroner Martha
Kroner Selig
Levy Denny
Levy Hildegard Marcus
Levy Jona
Levy Felix
Levy Louise
Leyde Helena Wertheimer
Leyde Sali
L=F6w Erna (Esther) Rimalt
L=F6w Liane (Lea)
L=F6w Nuchem
L=F6w Wilhelm
Manasse Eva
Marcus Irma Scheinberger
Marcus Kurt
Markus Clara Grund
Mendelsohn Leo
Mendelsohn Martin
Nordon Henriette Cohn
Nordon Berthold
Neumann Willi
Nussbaum Siegmund
Nussbaum Gisela Gessler
Rittler Luise
Rittler Marie Hirsch
Rittler Richard
Rosenthal Charlotte Witt
Rosenthal Martin
Rosenwasser Max Mejer
Rosenwasser Ryfka Regina Ritter
Rosenwasser Elisabeth Levy
Rothkugel Kaete
Schragenheim Babette Mann
Schragenheim Siegfried
Schwabe Gustav Ludwig
Schwabe Margarethe Frankenberg
Seckelson Elsbeth Arendt
Silbermann Martha Bernstein
Silbermann Salomon
Sonnenwirth Farkas
Strauss Else
Strauss Moses
Strauss Anna Sternberg
Voss Liselotte Katz
Voss Werner Willy
Weisstein Lotte Klein
Wiener Julius
Wiener Martha Schachian
Zoegall Kaethe Boehm
Zoegall Peter Julius


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #galicia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books
published by the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books
Project of JewishGen, Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published
in Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates
its link with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and
invaded by the Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of
Lithuania in 1319, and in 1569 it became the capital of the unified
Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe.
The list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in
earlier periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the
Soloveitchik dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob
Epstein the great Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin,
and many other major religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923,
Jews made up 60% of Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is
located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries
who contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for
future generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent
Victims of the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and
descendants of "Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also
available at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation
of Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George
Gorin, New York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief
Committee, 1950. Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland.
Alternate names for the town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish],
Graevo [Russian], Grayeve, Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland
since the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish
people and by 1857, the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76%
of the town's population. By 1921, the percentage of Jews had
decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941,
Jewish businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on
22 June 1941 marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors
thrust upon the Jewish population. Within a few months, 1,600 to
2,000 Jews had been sent to the transit camp at Bogosza and on to the
extermination camps at Treblinka and Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again,
see http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for
further information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books
in Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #galicia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books
published by the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books
Project of JewishGen, Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published
in Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates
its link with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and
invaded by the Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of
Lithuania in 1319, and in 1569 it became the capital of the unified
Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe.
The list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in
earlier periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the
Soloveitchik dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob
Epstein the great Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin,
and many other major religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923,
Jews made up 60% of Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is
located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries
who contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for
future generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent
Victims of the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and
descendants of "Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also
available at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation
of Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George
Gorin, New York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief
Committee, 1950. Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland.
Alternate names for the town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish],
Graevo [Russian], Grayeve, Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland
since the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish
people and by 1857, the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76%
of the town's population. By 1921, the percentage of Jews had
decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941,
Jewish businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on
22 June 1941 marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors
thrust upon the Jewish population. Within a few months, 1,600 to
2,000 Jews had been sent to the transit camp at Bogosza and on to the
extermination camps at Treblinka and Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again,
see http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for
further information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books
in Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Tarnopol 1910 Census Lindego Street #galicia

Richard Cooper
 

A grateful mazeltov to Gesher Galicia and everybody who has worked so
hard to bring us the 1910 Census of Tarnopol, so carefully indexed,
transcribed and translated - a shining example to us all of top-flight
genealogical work!

Thanks to you I have a list of the inhabitants of house 339, which had
been the family home of my FINKELSTEIN ancestors since at least 1834,
when my great-great-grandmother's younger sister Leja FINKELSTEIN was
born there.

However I have a question.

On the 1910 Census it is noted that House 339 had been renamed
Lindego 5. I can't seem to find a street called Lindego on any maps, either
modern or the historical ones in your excellent Map Room. Does anyone
know where exactly it was, and what is there today?

TIA, best wishes and happy ancestor-spotting,

Richard Cooper (NB: Not related to any COOPERs!)
Midhurst, UK

ADLER, FINKELSTEIN, PARYLLE, WEINTRAUB & ZILZ >from Tarnopol and
Trembowla; MILLET, ENGELBERG, BLUMENKEHL, SUSSWEIN, WACKS &
PITERZIL >from Tarnow, Dabrowa Tarnowska and Lezajsk; LEZTER,
SALENDER, RINENBERG, EISEN & KRAETTER >from Rzeszow and
Kolbuszowa; YAROSHEVSKY, SHAPOCHNIKOW & GRANITUR >from Odessa
and Zlatopol/Novomirgorod; LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev; BORENSTEIN,
MATELEVITCH,GODZINSKIJ & ZIMNOWICZ and >from Warsaw and Radun


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Tarnopol 1910 Census Lindego Street #galicia

Richard Cooper
 

A grateful mazeltov to Gesher Galicia and everybody who has worked so
hard to bring us the 1910 Census of Tarnopol, so carefully indexed,
transcribed and translated - a shining example to us all of top-flight
genealogical work!

Thanks to you I have a list of the inhabitants of house 339, which had
been the family home of my FINKELSTEIN ancestors since at least 1834,
when my great-great-grandmother's younger sister Leja FINKELSTEIN was
born there.

However I have a question.

On the 1910 Census it is noted that House 339 had been renamed
Lindego 5. I can't seem to find a street called Lindego on any maps, either
modern or the historical ones in your excellent Map Room. Does anyone
know where exactly it was, and what is there today?

TIA, best wishes and happy ancestor-spotting,

Richard Cooper (NB: Not related to any COOPERs!)
Midhurst, UK

ADLER, FINKELSTEIN, PARYLLE, WEINTRAUB & ZILZ >from Tarnopol and
Trembowla; MILLET, ENGELBERG, BLUMENKEHL, SUSSWEIN, WACKS &
PITERZIL >from Tarnow, Dabrowa Tarnowska and Lezajsk; LEZTER,
SALENDER, RINENBERG, EISEN & KRAETTER >from Rzeszow and
Kolbuszowa; YAROSHEVSKY, SHAPOCHNIKOW & GRANITUR >from Odessa
and Zlatopol/Novomirgorod; LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev; BORENSTEIN,
MATELEVITCH,GODZINSKIJ & ZIMNOWICZ and >from Warsaw and Radun


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #bessarabia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #bessarabia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Updates for the month of May, 2014 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May2014 at Bessarabia SIG.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our site.

- Family Memoirs. "Two Postcards >from Kamenka, Moldova". Author Ronald
Killian.

- Dubossary KehilaLinks website. A new addition to Bessarabia/Moldova
websites. Developed by Yefim Kogan
PLEASE CONSIDER CREATING a website for the town, shteitle you care about!!!

- Jewish Cemeteries. Dubossary Cemetery, New Section was indexed and
photographed and send to JOWBR. See the Cemetery report with maps,
statistical information, photographs and also a place you can see the photos
of Unknown graves.

PLEASE CONSIDER making a donation to Dubossary Cemetery project and/or to
other Cemetery projects of Bessarabia SIG:
Kishinev-Doyna Cemetery,
Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project (for a number of small
cemeteries in Moldova),
Beltsy Cemetery project (we are going to start Phase 2 of indexing
and photographing);
Tiraspol Cemetery project (one cemetery is ready this month with
more than 2000 records and photos, and the second cemetery work will start
soon!);
Lipkani Cemetery project (work was started, need more translators
with Hebrew! And also donations to the fund);
Brichani Cemetery project (not yet on Donation list, but please
donate to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project). Also need a Project Leader!

There is a plan to work on Kiliya and Izmail cemeteries (former Bessarabia,
now in Ukraine). For these we need Project Leaders and also donations (for
now donations may come to Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project).

-Genealogical Conferences. Find the schedule of all programs related to
Bessarabia, Moldova. See abstracts of presentations of Alla Chastina, our
guest >from Kishinev, Moldova, a film created in Bessarabia/Moldova, all
other Bessarabia events.
I would be glad to see you at the conference in July! Let's talk on Jewish
Genealogy topics.
PLEASE CONSIDER DONATING to the Bessarabia SIG Speakers Bureau fund. Helps
us to make the conference a success!

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Updates for the month of May, 2014 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

Here is an update for the month of May2014 at Bessarabia SIG.
See the details at the "What's New" section of our site.

- Family Memoirs. "Two Postcards >from Kamenka, Moldova". Author Ronald
Killian.

- Dubossary KehilaLinks website. A new addition to Bessarabia/Moldova
websites. Developed by Yefim Kogan
PLEASE CONSIDER CREATING a website for the town, shteitle you care about!!!

- Jewish Cemeteries. Dubossary Cemetery, New Section was indexed and
photographed and send to JOWBR. See the Cemetery report with maps,
statistical information, photographs and also a place you can see the photos
of Unknown graves.

PLEASE CONSIDER making a donation to Dubossary Cemetery project and/or to
other Cemetery projects of Bessarabia SIG:
Kishinev-Doyna Cemetery,
Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project (for a number of small
cemeteries in Moldova),
Beltsy Cemetery project (we are going to start Phase 2 of indexing
and photographing);
Tiraspol Cemetery project (one cemetery is ready this month with
more than 2000 records and photos, and the second cemetery work will start
soon!);
Lipkani Cemetery project (work was started, need more translators
with Hebrew! And also donations to the fund);
Brichani Cemetery project (not yet on Donation list, but please
donate to Bessarabia/Moldova Cemetery project). Also need a Project Leader!

There is a plan to work on Kiliya and Izmail cemeteries (former Bessarabia,
now in Ukraine). For these we need Project Leaders and also donations (for
now donations may come to Bessarabia-Moldova Cemetery project).

-Genealogical Conferences. Find the schedule of all programs related to
Bessarabia, Moldova. See abstracts of presentations of Alla Chastina, our
guest >from Kishinev, Moldova, a film created in Bessarabia/Moldova, all
other Bessarabia events.
I would be glad to see you at the conference in July! Let's talk on Jewish
Genealogy topics.
PLEASE CONSIDER DONATING to the Bessarabia SIG Speakers Bureau fund. Helps
us to make the conference a success!

Send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of how to
make our Bessarabia group better.

Thank you all,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China


Re: frenchsig digest: June 08, 2014 #france

amfaraggi@...
 

Hello Dena,
Meyer RABINOVITZ was naturalised French with his family on 1/11/1913. He was
born 18/06/1863 in Kovno. He had a wife born POLIAKOFF 15/05/1869 in
Doubrovno and a son Henri, born 7/01/1897 in Wilna. The decree is n°
118-2417.
I didn't find any Joseph MINOR, but a Gabriel. Minor.
Good luck.
Anne-Marie Faraggi (Switzerland)


Subject: Paris directories 1920-1940r
From: denawhit@...
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 00:39:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello,

I am wondering if anyone knows of any online Paris directories for years
1920-1940. I tried looking
at Gallica.org, but couldn't find any.

I am specifically looking two relatives:
Meyer RABINOVITZ (grandson of Rabbi Yitzchok Elchonon SPECTOR of Kovno), who
I know was
living in Paris in 1925. He was a jeweler.

Joseph Alexis MINOR originally >from Moscow, moved to Paris about 1920-30. (A
side point:
I am unsure whether this is the same person as Osip MINOR, son of Rabbi
Solomon MINOR,
rabbi of Moscow, but he was definitely related to him. If anyone knows
Osip's descendants,
I would be able to confirm whether it is indeed Joseph Alexis.)

Would appreciate any assistance.

Thanks,

Dena Whitman
New Jersey

You are currently subscribed to frenchsig as: [amfaraggi@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.Lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


French SIG #France Re: frenchsig digest: June 08, 2014 #france

amfaraggi@...
 

Hello Dena,
Meyer RABINOVITZ was naturalised French with his family on 1/11/1913. He was
born 18/06/1863 in Kovno. He had a wife born POLIAKOFF 15/05/1869 in
Doubrovno and a son Henri, born 7/01/1897 in Wilna. The decree is n°
118-2417.
I didn't find any Joseph MINOR, but a Gabriel. Minor.
Good luck.
Anne-Marie Faraggi (Switzerland)


Subject: Paris directories 1920-1940r
From: denawhit@...
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 00:39:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello,

I am wondering if anyone knows of any online Paris directories for years
1920-1940. I tried looking
at Gallica.org, but couldn't find any.

I am specifically looking two relatives:
Meyer RABINOVITZ (grandson of Rabbi Yitzchok Elchonon SPECTOR of Kovno), who
I know was
living in Paris in 1925. He was a jeweler.

Joseph Alexis MINOR originally >from Moscow, moved to Paris about 1920-30. (A
side point:
I am unsure whether this is the same person as Osip MINOR, son of Rabbi
Solomon MINOR,
rabbi of Moscow, but he was definitely related to him. If anyone knows
Osip's descendants,
I would be able to confirm whether it is indeed Joseph Alexis.)

Would appreciate any assistance.

Thanks,

Dena Whitman
New Jersey

You are currently subscribed to frenchsig as: [amfaraggi@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.Lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #austria-czech

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #austria-czech

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...