Date   

Re: Information on finding Berkson/Hirsh Canada #general

Alan Greenberg
 

I am replying privately to Ava with contact information for her family.

Researchers who are interested in Montreal and Quebec in general should have a
look at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal web site
(http://jgs-montreal.org) which has a number of How-to guides for researching
family, and should also consider contacting us directly at vital@....
We have access to many resources which are not readily available online.

Alan Greenberg
Vice-President, JGS-Montreal
Montreal, Canada

Ava Lynn Sweeney oceans@ wrote:

I have found many letters >from cousins who lived in Canada.They are dated
in the 1930's. The letter head says Berkson's women's wear of the better
kind 5014 Park avenue in Montreal, Canada.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Information on finding Berkson/Hirsh Canada #general

Alan Greenberg
 

I am replying privately to Ava with contact information for her family.

Researchers who are interested in Montreal and Quebec in general should have a
look at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal web site
(http://jgs-montreal.org) which has a number of How-to guides for researching
family, and should also consider contacting us directly at vital@....
We have access to many resources which are not readily available online.

Alan Greenberg
Vice-President, JGS-Montreal
Montreal, Canada

Ava Lynn Sweeney oceans@ wrote:

I have found many letters >from cousins who lived in Canada.They are dated
in the 1930's. The letter head says Berkson's women's wear of the better
kind 5014 Park avenue in Montreal, Canada.


Last call to take advantage of early registration which ends this coming Saturday night #galicia

Hal Bookbinder
 

Do not miss the premier Jewish Genealogical event of 2014, the IAJGS
Conference in Salt Lake City, July 27 - August 1.

While regular registration at $325 is a bargain, why not get it all at the
early registration price of $295? Early registration ends on Saturday,
May 31, 014 at 11:59 CDT.

Cannot make it to SLC? Consider registering for IAJGS LIVE! and see
about 50 of the best programs over the Internet for $149. You can
participate as they are being presented and view them anytime for
three months after the conference.

For a great experience, participate in person at the conference.

- Six days of sessions with over 250 choices for all levels of
genealogists tracing their Jewish roots.
- Many sessions being offered for the first time on WWI research,
genealogical Ethics, Jewish Migrations and more.
- Guided research at the world's foremost genealogical library.
- Free access to scores of online databases.
- A secure online conference Family Finder to link up with others,
maybe find an unknown cousin!
- A welcoming reception and great keynote speaker (David Laskin,
award winning author), on Sunday.
- A one-man professional play about the Warsaw Ghetto archives of
Emmanuel Ringelblum, "Time Capsule in a Milk Can"
_ A great selection of films on Jewish Genealogy and culture.
- Additional fee items include Breakfasts with the experts, SIG
Luncheons, Gala Banquet, Computer workshops, Trip to Ancestry.

Visit www.iajgs2014.org for more information and to register.

See you in SLC! It is where your friends will be!

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
bookbndr@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Last call to take advantage of early registration which ends this coming Saturday night #galicia

Hal Bookbinder
 

Do not miss the premier Jewish Genealogical event of 2014, the IAJGS
Conference in Salt Lake City, July 27 - August 1.

While regular registration at $325 is a bargain, why not get it all at the
early registration price of $295? Early registration ends on Saturday,
May 31, 014 at 11:59 CDT.

Cannot make it to SLC? Consider registering for IAJGS LIVE! and see
about 50 of the best programs over the Internet for $149. You can
participate as they are being presented and view them anytime for
three months after the conference.

For a great experience, participate in person at the conference.

- Six days of sessions with over 250 choices for all levels of
genealogists tracing their Jewish roots.
- Many sessions being offered for the first time on WWI research,
genealogical Ethics, Jewish Migrations and more.
- Guided research at the world's foremost genealogical library.
- Free access to scores of online databases.
- A secure online conference Family Finder to link up with others,
maybe find an unknown cousin!
- A welcoming reception and great keynote speaker (David Laskin,
award winning author), on Sunday.
- A one-man professional play about the Warsaw Ghetto archives of
Emmanuel Ringelblum, "Time Capsule in a Milk Can"
_ A great selection of films on Jewish Genealogy and culture.
- Additional fee items include Breakfasts with the experts, SIG
Luncheons, Gala Banquet, Computer workshops, Trip to Ancestry.

Visit www.iajgs2014.org for more information and to register.

See you in SLC! It is where your friends will be!

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
bookbndr@...


Last call to take advantage of early registration which ends this coming Saturday night #usa

Hal Bookbinder
 

Do not miss the premier Jewish Genealogical event of 2014, the IAJGS
Conference in Salt Lake City, July 27 - August 1.

While regular registration at $325 is a bargain, why not get it all at
the early registration price of $295? Early registration ends on
Saturday, May 31, 014 at 11:59 CDT.

Cannot make it to SLC? Consider registering for IAJGS LIVE! and see
about 50 of the best programs over the Internet for $149. You can
participate as they are being presented and view them anytime for
three months after the conference.

For a great experience, participate in person at the conference.

- Six days of sessions with over 250 choices for all levels of
genealogists tracing their Jewish roots.
- Many sessions being offered for the first time on WWI research,
genealogical Ethics, Jewish Migrations and more.
- Guided research at the world's foremost genealogical library.
- Free access to scores of online databases.
- A secure online conference Family Finder to link up with others,
maybe find an unknown cousin!
- A welcoming reception and great keynote speaker (David Laskey, award
winning author), on Sunday.
- A one-man professional play about the Warsaw Ghetto archives of
Emmanuel Ringelblum, "Time Capsule in a Milk Can"
_ A great selection of films on Jewish Genealogy and culture.
- Additional fee items include Breakfasts with the experts, SIG
Luncheons, Gala Banquet, Computer workshops, Trip to Ancestry.

Visit www.iajgs2014.org for more information and to register.

See you in SLC! It is where your friends will be!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
bookbndr@...


Early American SIG #USA Last call to take advantage of early registration which ends this coming Saturday night #usa

Hal Bookbinder
 

Do not miss the premier Jewish Genealogical event of 2014, the IAJGS
Conference in Salt Lake City, July 27 - August 1.

While regular registration at $325 is a bargain, why not get it all at
the early registration price of $295? Early registration ends on
Saturday, May 31, 014 at 11:59 CDT.

Cannot make it to SLC? Consider registering for IAJGS LIVE! and see
about 50 of the best programs over the Internet for $149. You can
participate as they are being presented and view them anytime for
three months after the conference.

For a great experience, participate in person at the conference.

- Six days of sessions with over 250 choices for all levels of
genealogists tracing their Jewish roots.
- Many sessions being offered for the first time on WWI research,
genealogical Ethics, Jewish Migrations and more.
- Guided research at the world's foremost genealogical library.
- Free access to scores of online databases.
- A secure online conference Family Finder to link up with others,
maybe find an unknown cousin!
- A welcoming reception and great keynote speaker (David Laskey, award
winning author), on Sunday.
- A one-man professional play about the Warsaw Ghetto archives of
Emmanuel Ringelblum, "Time Capsule in a Milk Can"
_ A great selection of films on Jewish Genealogy and culture.
- Additional fee items include Breakfasts with the experts, SIG
Luncheons, Gala Banquet, Computer workshops, Trip to Ancestry.

Visit www.iajgs2014.org for more information and to register.

See you in SLC! It is where your friends will be!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
bookbndr@...


Need some help with 1850-1877 Hanusovce n/T. death records in German #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

I would love some help with the German-language death records for
1850-1877 for Hanusfalu/Hanusovce nad Toplou.

I can read most of the German in the form but little of the e.g. causes
for death. I saw a template or guide for the 1869 Census for marriages
and am curious if there is one for this one on Jewish Gen, but in any
case the script with causes for death and other variables is hard to
decipher. I only need full information on about ten records.

An example is here: http://bit.ly/RB5II0 (real url:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11631-267726-87?cc=1554443&wc=MPFZ-3TR:107654001,108764701,108764702,950138801)


Much of the rest is similar. If you can help please write me privately.

Thanks,
Todd Edelman
Los Angeles


Hungary SIG #Hungary Need some help with 1850-1877 Hanusovce n/T. death records in German #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

I would love some help with the German-language death records for
1850-1877 for Hanusfalu/Hanusovce nad Toplou.

I can read most of the German in the form but little of the e.g. causes
for death. I saw a template or guide for the 1869 Census for marriages
and am curious if there is one for this one on Jewish Gen, but in any
case the script with causes for death and other variables is hard to
decipher. I only need full information on about ten records.

An example is here: http://bit.ly/RB5II0 (real url:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11631-267726-87?cc=1554443&wc=MPFZ-3TR:107654001,108764701,108764702,950138801)


Much of the rest is similar. If you can help please write me privately.

Thanks,
Todd Edelman
Los Angeles


Translation of Altdorf, Baden Birth Records Requested #germany

Keren Weiner <kerenweiner1@...>
 

Dear Fellow GerSIG members,

I've posted three birth records in German for which I request
translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33920
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33921
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33922

I believe these are the birth records of Abraham GROSS (1837), Joseph
GROSS (1841) and Lehmann GROSS (1843), of Altdorf, Baden, Germany.
The parents of these brothers are Samuel GROSS and Sarah SCHWAB. I am
looking for a translation of the additional information. I am also
wondering if any other relatives are mentioned or any other town name.

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much, Keren Weiner, Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Researching GROSS family of Altdorf, Baden

Moderator Reminder:
There is a Community Links page for one of the many towns in Germany
called Altdorf. Altdorf (48°16' N, 07°49' E)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Altdorf

At Alemannia Judaica, the Jewish cemetery serving Altdorf is described
with many photographs at:
http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/schmieheim_friedhof.htm


German SIG #Germany Translation of Altdorf, Baden Birth Records Requested #germany

Keren Weiner <kerenweiner1@...>
 

Dear Fellow GerSIG members,

I've posted three birth records in German for which I request
translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33920
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33921
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33922

I believe these are the birth records of Abraham GROSS (1837), Joseph
GROSS (1841) and Lehmann GROSS (1843), of Altdorf, Baden, Germany.
The parents of these brothers are Samuel GROSS and Sarah SCHWAB. I am
looking for a translation of the additional information. I am also
wondering if any other relatives are mentioned or any other town name.

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much, Keren Weiner, Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Researching GROSS family of Altdorf, Baden

Moderator Reminder:
There is a Community Links page for one of the many towns in Germany
called Altdorf. Altdorf (48°16' N, 07°49' E)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Altdorf

At Alemannia Judaica, the Jewish cemetery serving Altdorf is described
with many photographs at:
http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/schmieheim_friedhof.htm


New Sephardic databases online #france

Jeff at SG
 

Hi everyone,

Here is a list of interesting newly available searchable Sephardic
databases that some would hopefully find useful.

The Buenas Aires Avellaneda Mar Sephardic Cemetery
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/ArgentinaCemeterySrchFrm.html

Those with ancestors who lived in Egypt during its heydays in the 1940s
would find this new database useful
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/DirectoryEgypt1941.html

as well as the related
Annuaire des Juifs d'Egypte 1942 & 1943
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/EgyptAnnuaire42_43SrchFrm.html
and the index of names from
Fargeon, Maurice. Les Juifs d'Egypte des origines a nos jours
[The Jews of Egypt >from the Origins to Our Days]
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/egyptFargeonSrchFrm.html
etc.

French researchers would find the following new databases contributed by
Alexander Beider helpful:
The 1808 Name Declaration of the "Juifs du Pape" who lived in Avignon
and the Comtat Venaissin
<http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/FranceSoutheastNameDeclaration1808
SrchFrm.html>
[TinyURL: http://tinyurl.com/negmob4
and the Sephardic Jews >from Bordeaux, Bayonne in southwestern France
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/FranceSouthwestNamesSrchFrm.html

Sephardic Jews with ancestors who lived in Algeria would also be
interested in the newly available large database of names extracted by
Mathilde Tagger >from the Algerian Jewish periodical "La voix d’Israël",
Oran (1914-1923)
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/OranVoixSrchFrm.html

For researchers who are francophone, these databases are also available
in French versions.

Finally, the combined Index of Sephardic names is now expanded to index
170,000 Sephardic names at
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/indexSrchFrm.html

I hope these newly available resources will help you along in your research.

Jeff Malka


French SIG #France New Sephardic databases online #france

Jeff at SG
 

Hi everyone,

Here is a list of interesting newly available searchable Sephardic
databases that some would hopefully find useful.

The Buenas Aires Avellaneda Mar Sephardic Cemetery
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/ArgentinaCemeterySrchFrm.html

Those with ancestors who lived in Egypt during its heydays in the 1940s
would find this new database useful
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/DirectoryEgypt1941.html

as well as the related
Annuaire des Juifs d'Egypte 1942 & 1943
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/EgyptAnnuaire42_43SrchFrm.html
and the index of names from
Fargeon, Maurice. Les Juifs d'Egypte des origines a nos jours
[The Jews of Egypt >from the Origins to Our Days]
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/egyptFargeonSrchFrm.html
etc.

French researchers would find the following new databases contributed by
Alexander Beider helpful:
The 1808 Name Declaration of the "Juifs du Pape" who lived in Avignon
and the Comtat Venaissin
<http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/FranceSoutheastNameDeclaration1808
SrchFrm.html>
[TinyURL: http://tinyurl.com/negmob4
and the Sephardic Jews >from Bordeaux, Bayonne in southwestern France
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/FranceSouthwestNamesSrchFrm.html

Sephardic Jews with ancestors who lived in Algeria would also be
interested in the newly available large database of names extracted by
Mathilde Tagger >from the Algerian Jewish periodical "La voix d’Israël",
Oran (1914-1923)
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/OranVoixSrchFrm.html

For researchers who are francophone, these databases are also available
in French versions.

Finally, the combined Index of Sephardic names is now expanded to index
170,000 Sephardic names at
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/indexSrchFrm.html

I hope these newly available resources will help you along in your research.

Jeff Malka


Re: relicensing for doctors in another country #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

R. Oppenheimer wrote:
I am also aware of medical doctors trained in Germany, left
prior to the Holocaust, and returning to Germany. They claimed that
in order to practice their profession, they would need to requalify
in their new home, which was too difficult.

They claimed correctly. The medical profession acts in concert to limit
the number of those entering it.

I have 2 anecdotes about the difficulty of transferring medical training
between countries. The first was my paternal aunt, who received her
medical degree in Germany in the WWI period, at a time when Germany
dominated science. She came down with TB, which, in those pre-antibiotic
days, required her to live in Switzerland. In spite of the fact that she
had done well on all her exams in Germany & was licensed to practice
there with no trouble, she failed the Swiss exam twice & was too
demoralized to try a third time. My father always figured the exam
must have been extra-difficult to reduce competition for native Swiss doctors.

A doctor friend of the family >from Germany took the medical exam in New
York. He was told he must have cheated, because his grade was too high.
As a 'special favor' he was allowed to retake the exam - by himself,
in a room with a proctor present the entire time. Once again, he was told
that although they couldn't see how he could possibly have cheated,
he must have, because his grade was again too high. He had to grovel
to be permitted to take the exam again. This time, he deliberately
answered some questions incorrectly to lower his grade to an acceptable
level, and became licensed to practice.

Some others also managed to navigate this difficult process - our family
doctor when I was a child was a German-Jewish immigrant, and I met another
such in a town about 30 miles away. Our optometrist was also a
German-Jewish immigrant. Of the three, he had the situation that would
have been most comfortable for someone >from a large, cosmopolitan, city,
as all three of the men were - he was able to settle in a mid-sized city
with an amateur orchestra in which he played violin. The other two men
settled in small towns of less than 2000 inhabitants. One of them
actually had its own movie theater, the other was 15 miles >from the
nearest. I don't think those would have been their first choices.

But it isn't just the medical profession that views academic credentials
from abroad with suspicion. In some cases, the material is truly not
transferable. For instance, US law is based on English common law,
while German law is based on Roman law, and French law is based on the
Code Napoleon. It's therefore true that if you train as an attorney in
one of these countries & want to practice in another, it's not going to
work.

It's also true to a certain extent for teaching, as the material students
are expected to learn differs greatly >from country to country. And of
course, history is taught with a quite different emphasis in different
countries. On the other hand, you'd think that science would transfer.

It's true that there's a truly international exchange in science on the
doctoral level, but at lower levels? I once worked for a large industrial
research lab, where there was a great deal of degree snobbery in the
management, and lab technicians felt put upon. Management used to use
as an example that they recognized excellence in spite of degrees the
case of a Polish emigrant, who 'rose' >from technician level to
professional level in 3 years. Everyone not in management used to laugh
bitterly about this - the man had a Master's degree in chemistry from
Poland and should never have been hired at technician level! It wasn'
much credit to management that it took them 3 years to recognize the mistake!

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@...


German SIG #Germany RE: relicensing for doctors in another country #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

R. Oppenheimer wrote:
I am also aware of medical doctors trained in Germany, left
prior to the Holocaust, and returning to Germany. They claimed that
in order to practice their profession, they would need to requalify
in their new home, which was too difficult.

They claimed correctly. The medical profession acts in concert to limit
the number of those entering it.

I have 2 anecdotes about the difficulty of transferring medical training
between countries. The first was my paternal aunt, who received her
medical degree in Germany in the WWI period, at a time when Germany
dominated science. She came down with TB, which, in those pre-antibiotic
days, required her to live in Switzerland. In spite of the fact that she
had done well on all her exams in Germany & was licensed to practice
there with no trouble, she failed the Swiss exam twice & was too
demoralized to try a third time. My father always figured the exam
must have been extra-difficult to reduce competition for native Swiss doctors.

A doctor friend of the family >from Germany took the medical exam in New
York. He was told he must have cheated, because his grade was too high.
As a 'special favor' he was allowed to retake the exam - by himself,
in a room with a proctor present the entire time. Once again, he was told
that although they couldn't see how he could possibly have cheated,
he must have, because his grade was again too high. He had to grovel
to be permitted to take the exam again. This time, he deliberately
answered some questions incorrectly to lower his grade to an acceptable
level, and became licensed to practice.

Some others also managed to navigate this difficult process - our family
doctor when I was a child was a German-Jewish immigrant, and I met another
such in a town about 30 miles away. Our optometrist was also a
German-Jewish immigrant. Of the three, he had the situation that would
have been most comfortable for someone >from a large, cosmopolitan, city,
as all three of the men were - he was able to settle in a mid-sized city
with an amateur orchestra in which he played violin. The other two men
settled in small towns of less than 2000 inhabitants. One of them
actually had its own movie theater, the other was 15 miles >from the
nearest. I don't think those would have been their first choices.

But it isn't just the medical profession that views academic credentials
from abroad with suspicion. In some cases, the material is truly not
transferable. For instance, US law is based on English common law,
while German law is based on Roman law, and French law is based on the
Code Napoleon. It's therefore true that if you train as an attorney in
one of these countries & want to practice in another, it's not going to
work.

It's also true to a certain extent for teaching, as the material students
are expected to learn differs greatly >from country to country. And of
course, history is taught with a quite different emphasis in different
countries. On the other hand, you'd think that science would transfer.

It's true that there's a truly international exchange in science on the
doctoral level, but at lower levels? I once worked for a large industrial
research lab, where there was a great deal of degree snobbery in the
management, and lab technicians felt put upon. Management used to use
as an example that they recognized excellence in spite of degrees the
case of a Polish emigrant, who 'rose' >from technician level to
professional level in 3 years. Everyone not in management used to laugh
bitterly about this - the man had a Master's degree in chemistry from
Poland and should never have been hired at technician level! It wasn'
much credit to management that it took them 3 years to recognize the mistake!

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@...


Re: contemporary census figures for Jews living in Germany? #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Naomi Minna Rosenthal has asked:

Are there any sources for the number of contemporary Jewish residents
of Germany, or German cities, or other European countries?
yes, there are. The statistics about the members of the Jewish
communities in Germany is published by "Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der
Juden in Deutschland". Please see the statistics for 2013 here:

http://www.zwst.org/de/service/mitgliederstatistik/

In 2013, the Jewish communities in Germany had about 100.000 members.
There are another 90.000 Jews who are not member of a Jewish communities
(most immigrants >from the former Soviet Union).

Regards, Tobias A. Kemper, Alfter, Germany

Moderator note: Thank you for this helpful information. Your well-informed
comments are appreciated.


German SIG #Germany Re: contemporary census figures for Jews living in Germany? #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Naomi Minna Rosenthal has asked:

Are there any sources for the number of contemporary Jewish residents
of Germany, or German cities, or other European countries?
yes, there are. The statistics about the members of the Jewish
communities in Germany is published by "Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der
Juden in Deutschland". Please see the statistics for 2013 here:

http://www.zwst.org/de/service/mitgliederstatistik/

In 2013, the Jewish communities in Germany had about 100.000 members.
There are another 90.000 Jews who are not member of a Jewish communities
(most immigrants >from the former Soviet Union).

Regards, Tobias A. Kemper, Alfter, Germany

Moderator note: Thank you for this helpful information. Your well-informed
comments are appreciated.


Lehmann family in NYC and San Francisco. #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to contact the Lehmann family of Dr. Frederick Fritz of New
York who was an ENT specialist.\His children - Michael of San
Francisco and Karin who married Norman Kirschner.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lehmann family in NYC and San Francisco. #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to contact the Lehmann family of Dr. Frederick Fritz of New
York who was an ENT specialist.\His children - Michael of San
Francisco and Karin who married Norman Kirschner.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request - Russian & Help to solve mystery #poland

Nusy Ickowics
 

Many thanks to David who responded to my requests for the translation
of the vital records of my family. However, I would appreciate if
someone can please give me a detailed and through translation of the
following two records

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33953

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33950

This record seems to be a mystery to me since the index and the
file say the date of 1889, and David said he is sure that it is 1890
and it seems that it is my GGGM, I have a record of her giving birth
to a son in 1893! I am posting the link to that archived record here

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33725

Maybe that record has a different date?

Please help.
Thank you!

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
--
Nusy Ickowics


ViewMate translation request for revision list pages - Russian #general

Beth Galleto
 

Thanks to translations I received for pages I submitted to ViewMate last week, I
was able to figure out that the pages, which had been sent to me separately, were
actually facing pages >from the same records, with information for the men on the
left side page and for the women on the right. I have combined some of these pages
and now hope to fill in missing information. The documents can be found through
these links:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33983

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33986

On VM33983, #42 on the right side was previously translated as Zalman's spouse:
Genya Abramova and daughters Fruma and Dvoyra. I had not previously submitted the
left, but now I have merged the two and would appreciate a translation showing what
the left side page says about Zalman and his sons.
On VM33896, #231 on the left side was previously translated as Ayzyk Ayzykov and
his sons Getsel and Leyba, but the right was not translated. I would appreciate a
translation showing what the right side page says about Ayzyk's wife and daughters.

Please note that I am also interested in other information given about these people
(addresses or occupations?) as well as what other surnames are listed in these
pages. Some of them may be people who later married into the family. Please respond
via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you so much for your help.
Beth Galleto
Greenbrae, CA