Date   

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Translation Request posting #ukraine

Dr. Rob Shumaker <rgsphd@...>
 

Subject: ViewMate translation request - Yiddish
I would greatly appreciate a direct translation of the Yiddish text on a
photograph of my great-grandfather. The image appears on ViewMate at the
following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32563
Please respond using the online ViewMate form.
Thank you so much,
Rob Shumaker, Ph.D.


Translation Request posting #ukraine

Dr. Rob Shumaker <rgsphd@...>
 

Subject: ViewMate translation request - Yiddish
I would greatly appreciate a direct translation of the Yiddish text on a
photograph of my great-grandfather. The image appears on ViewMate at the
following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32563
Please respond using the online ViewMate form.
Thank you so much,
Rob Shumaker, Ph.D.


Seeking Henry and Pauline HART #usa

Mike White <mikewhite.bromham@...>
 

I'm hoping to track down some information in connection with two of my
great great grandparents who emigrated to America, probably in the
mid-1840s. Their, presumably anglicised, names were Henry and Pauline
Hart, although Pauline was also known as Pauline Wood. They appear in
the New York State census of 1855 where their birthplace is recorded as
Poland. But in the 1860, and subsequent, US Federal censuses their
birthplace is recorded as Prussia. Their years of birth vary in these
records but Henry was probably born in 1820 and Pauline around 1818.
Their first child was 7 years old in 1855 and was born in New York so I
suspect they arrived around 1847. My best guess is that they came from
some part of Pomerania.

My wife and I are going to Berlin in May and it would be easy for us to
visit the Stettin archive. But our limited knowledge of German, and
extremely limited knowledge of Polish, might render the visit
frustratingly unproductive. So we would be grateful for any advice
about how we might track down something about their European origins,
given that we can only guess what their original names might have been. Thanks,

Mike White mikewhite.bromham@...


Early American SIG #USA Seeking Henry and Pauline HART #usa

Mike White <mikewhite.bromham@...>
 

I'm hoping to track down some information in connection with two of my
great great grandparents who emigrated to America, probably in the
mid-1840s. Their, presumably anglicised, names were Henry and Pauline
Hart, although Pauline was also known as Pauline Wood. They appear in
the New York State census of 1855 where their birthplace is recorded as
Poland. But in the 1860, and subsequent, US Federal censuses their
birthplace is recorded as Prussia. Their years of birth vary in these
records but Henry was probably born in 1820 and Pauline around 1818.
Their first child was 7 years old in 1855 and was born in New York so I
suspect they arrived around 1847. My best guess is that they came from
some part of Pomerania.

My wife and I are going to Berlin in May and it would be easy for us to
visit the Stettin archive. But our limited knowledge of German, and
extremely limited knowledge of Polish, might render the visit
frustratingly unproductive. So we would be grateful for any advice
about how we might track down something about their European origins,
given that we can only guess what their original names might have been. Thanks,

Mike White mikewhite.bromham@...


SITE CITE 'Heimatgeschichte der badischen Juden' on line #germany

Ton Tielen
 

There probably isn't an English version.

The German version can be consulted - and downloaded - here:

http://sammlungen.ub.uni-frankfurt.de/freimann/content/titleinfo/427625

[The website can be navigated in English (toggle upper right corner).
The book is in German and printed in Fraktur typeface. Moderator]

Best regards, Ton Tielen, The Hague, The Netherlands

On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 Peter Dreifuss <padreifuss@...> asked if
there might be an English language source similar to:
Berthold Rosenthal's > book 'Heimatgeschichte der badischen
Juden' of 1927 which became an important historical source of
information on the Jews of Baden. Much of the information would
have been lost had it not been for his writings and archival
information which are available at the Leo Baeck Institute.

My question: (1) Is there an English version of this book or
(2) another equivalent book, either of which deal with a
comprehensive history of the Jews of Baden >from the first Jews
on the Rhine 300 AD until the early 20th Century.


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE 'Heimatgeschichte der badischen Juden' on line #germany

Ton Tielen
 

There probably isn't an English version.

The German version can be consulted - and downloaded - here:

http://sammlungen.ub.uni-frankfurt.de/freimann/content/titleinfo/427625

[The website can be navigated in English (toggle upper right corner).
The book is in German and printed in Fraktur typeface. Moderator]

Best regards, Ton Tielen, The Hague, The Netherlands

On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 Peter Dreifuss <padreifuss@...> asked if
there might be an English language source similar to:
Berthold Rosenthal's > book 'Heimatgeschichte der badischen
Juden' of 1927 which became an important historical source of
information on the Jews of Baden. Much of the information would
have been lost had it not been for his writings and archival
information which are available at the Leo Baeck Institute.

My question: (1) Is there an English version of this book or
(2) another equivalent book, either of which deal with a
comprehensive history of the Jews of Baden >from the first Jews
on the Rhine 300 AD until the early 20th Century.


Re: INTRO - Researching ENGELHARDT family from Erfurt & Bremen, Germany #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Lisa:
Welcome! Thanks also for entering your interests in the Family Finder.

What evidence do you have that your ancestors were Jewish? I don't mean
to discourage you, but neither of the two surnames you mention is
particularly associated with German Jews. According to Menk's
_Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames_, there were only 2 families in
the early 19thC by that name, both in Franconia (Kitzingen and Fuerth).
That's not particularly close to Erfurt. In contrast there are over
10,000 ENGELHARD[T] entries in the German phone directory, suggesting
that the name *is* very common among Gentiles. KRANERT is less common
(ca. 100 in the phone book) but no identifiably Jewish ones in the
various databases I've checked.

Then there's the given name Christoph. People called that weren't Jewish
and generally still aren't. Is there a family tradition that an ancestor
converted >from Judaism?

You may have good evidence that your great-great-grandfather was indeed
Jewish, of course. Could you tell us a little more? Thanks,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 3/11/2014 8:32 PM, Lisa Deily wrote:
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research
for 10 years but just discovered my Jewish roots recently......
My primary research goals now are to find the birth records
for my Jewish great-great grandfather (Josef/Joseph b. 16 Feb 1866
in Jeistungen?, Erfurt, Germany) and any information about his
parents (Josef or Christof ENGELHARDT & Wilhelmina KRANERT)......
I have found records of Joseph ENGELHARDT,
carpenter in the 1870 Erfurt directory and J. Christof, carpenter
& J. ENGLEHARDT, bricklayer in the 1898 Bremen directory.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is 628111. The family names and
ancestral towns I have entered in the JGFF (JewishGen Family
Finder) are: ENGELHARDT >from ERFURT; KRANERT >from ERFURT


German SIG #Germany Re: INTRO - Researching ENGELHARDT family from Erfurt & Bremen, Germany #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Lisa:
Welcome! Thanks also for entering your interests in the Family Finder.

What evidence do you have that your ancestors were Jewish? I don't mean
to discourage you, but neither of the two surnames you mention is
particularly associated with German Jews. According to Menk's
_Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames_, there were only 2 families in
the early 19thC by that name, both in Franconia (Kitzingen and Fuerth).
That's not particularly close to Erfurt. In contrast there are over
10,000 ENGELHARD[T] entries in the German phone directory, suggesting
that the name *is* very common among Gentiles. KRANERT is less common
(ca. 100 in the phone book) but no identifiably Jewish ones in the
various databases I've checked.

Then there's the given name Christoph. People called that weren't Jewish
and generally still aren't. Is there a family tradition that an ancestor
converted >from Judaism?

You may have good evidence that your great-great-grandfather was indeed
Jewish, of course. Could you tell us a little more? Thanks,

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 3/11/2014 8:32 PM, Lisa Deily wrote:
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research
for 10 years but just discovered my Jewish roots recently......
My primary research goals now are to find the birth records
for my Jewish great-great grandfather (Josef/Joseph b. 16 Feb 1866
in Jeistungen?, Erfurt, Germany) and any information about his
parents (Josef or Christof ENGELHARDT & Wilhelmina KRANERT)......
I have found records of Joseph ENGELHARDT,
carpenter in the 1870 Erfurt directory and J. Christof, carpenter
& J. ENGLEHARDT, bricklayer in the 1898 Bremen directory.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is 628111. The family names and
ancestral towns I have entered in the JGFF (JewishGen Family
Finder) are: ENGELHARDT >from ERFURT; KRANERT >from ERFURT


Re: Bodsky Russia? #general

Miunthel -
 

I think it could be a misspelling or an alternate spelling of the town
of Botski, which was located in the Grodno district. I don't know much
about Botski; however it is mentioned in Henryk Sienkiewicz's book,
"The Deluge" and in the 1850s Gazetteer of the World.

- Miranda Flint

On Mon, Mar 10, 2014 at 6:57 PM, Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...> wrote:
One difficulty I've had in tracing the ZLOTNICK line of my family is that
in all the US documentation on them, they just put down "Russia" as their
country of origin which, at the time they came, could've meant anything. But
now I have come across one possible relatively who arrived in 1914 and after
saying she came >from Russia, put on the manifest a town name that looks like
"Bodsky." I searched on that and came up dry ... does that entry suggest
anything to anyone here?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Bodsky Russia? #general

Miunthel -
 

I think it could be a misspelling or an alternate spelling of the town
of Botski, which was located in the Grodno district. I don't know much
about Botski; however it is mentioned in Henryk Sienkiewicz's book,
"The Deluge" and in the 1850s Gazetteer of the World.

- Miranda Flint

On Mon, Mar 10, 2014 at 6:57 PM, Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...> wrote:
One difficulty I've had in tracing the ZLOTNICK line of my family is that
in all the US documentation on them, they just put down "Russia" as their
country of origin which, at the time they came, could've meant anything. But
now I have come across one possible relatively who arrived in 1914 and after
saying she came >from Russia, put on the manifest a town name that looks like
"Bodsky." I searched on that and came up dry ... does that entry suggest
anything to anyone here?


Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Yes I have used the New York 1890 Police Census and yes it can be very
helpful in the right set of circumstances.

However be aware it is only the name of the people their age and
relationship. It does not provide the full level of detail that a
normal US Federal Census provides.

Secondly to use it you must know the address the people were living at
in the fall of 1890. There is no name index for this census.

At the New York Public Library they did have a book that permitted you
to convert addresses into the appropriate data needed for searching.
As I recall it involved the use of a map and the book -- but I have not
actually done it in a while.

I am not sure -- maybe other people can comment -- how complete the
Police Census is and if it is more or less accurate than the normal US
Federal Census.

Get the address can be difficult because people moved around a lot in
those years. Some times you can find the people in the City Directory
or otherwise you might be able to find an address >from birth or
marriage certificates. But unless those certificates are 1890 the
address might not be the right one for the people.

However this Census permitted me to locate my great great grandmother
and her children in Manhattan and in the case of my great grandfather I
had a happy surprise because his sister in law is living with the
family single and unmarried. It helped me guess when she immigrated to
the USA.

I am happy to do look up for people at the NY Public Library but I do
ask that you pay my expenses. Ancestry at one point loaded a very
small section of the Census onto their system but I don't think they
ever went back and loaded more of it.

Contact me off list if you want to discuss this in greater detail.

A. Jordan

-----Original Message-----
From: Bernerfolk <bernerfolk@...>

Has anyone used the 1890 NYC police census and found it helpful (I'm
thinking about ordering the microfilm >from FHL)?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Yes I have used the New York 1890 Police Census and yes it can be very
helpful in the right set of circumstances.

However be aware it is only the name of the people their age and
relationship. It does not provide the full level of detail that a
normal US Federal Census provides.

Secondly to use it you must know the address the people were living at
in the fall of 1890. There is no name index for this census.

At the New York Public Library they did have a book that permitted you
to convert addresses into the appropriate data needed for searching.
As I recall it involved the use of a map and the book -- but I have not
actually done it in a while.

I am not sure -- maybe other people can comment -- how complete the
Police Census is and if it is more or less accurate than the normal US
Federal Census.

Get the address can be difficult because people moved around a lot in
those years. Some times you can find the people in the City Directory
or otherwise you might be able to find an address >from birth or
marriage certificates. But unless those certificates are 1890 the
address might not be the right one for the people.

However this Census permitted me to locate my great great grandmother
and her children in Manhattan and in the case of my great grandfather I
had a happy surprise because his sister in law is living with the
family single and unmarried. It helped me guess when she immigrated to
the USA.

I am happy to do look up for people at the NY Public Library but I do
ask that you pay my expenses. Ancestry at one point loaded a very
small section of the Census onto their system but I don't think they
ever went back and loaded more of it.

Contact me off list if you want to discuss this in greater detail.

A. Jordan

-----Original Message-----
From: Bernerfolk <bernerfolk@...>

Has anyone used the 1890 NYC police census and found it helpful (I'm
thinking about ordering the microfilm >from FHL)?


Headstone Translation - Hebrew #general

Janice Brockman
 

I've posted headstone in Hebrew for which I need a loose translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32662
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Janice Brockman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Headstone Translation - Hebrew #general

Janice Brockman
 

I've posted headstone in Hebrew for which I need a loose translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32662
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Janice Brockman


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

David Ellis
 

I obtained a page >from a revision history (census) record for Vilnius,
Lithuania in 1850, including an entry for an ancestor of mine, Yakir SIROTA.

The image is on ViewMate:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32629

A translation of the entries and notes handwritten in Russian would be very
much appreciated. Please send replies to my e-mail address, which is in the
signature block below. Thanks in advance!

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

David Ellis
 

I obtained a page >from a revision history (census) record for Vilnius,
Lithuania in 1850, including an entry for an ancestor of mine, Yakir SIROTA.

The image is on ViewMate:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32629

A translation of the entries and notes handwritten in Russian would be very
much appreciated. Please send replies to my e-mail address, which is in the
signature block below. Thanks in advance!

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


Polish translation request #general

Marilyn Silva <marilynsilva32@...>
 

Genners;

I've posted a marriage record in Polish for which I need a translation.
The marriage is of Chaja Ryfka Pfeferblum to Szapsia Wachockier. I
would appreciate the names, dates and places. It is on VieMate at the
following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=32283 .

Thank you
Marilyn Silva

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish translation request #general

Marilyn Silva <marilynsilva32@...>
 

Genners;

I've posted a marriage record in Polish for which I need a translation.
The marriage is of Chaja Ryfka Pfeferblum to Szapsia Wachockier. I
would appreciate the names, dates and places. It is on VieMate at the
following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=32283 .

Thank you
Marilyn Silva

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Thanks Re: Immigrant search 1900-1907 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my original question which was
trying to find a way to search for a woman and two young children when
I only had a reasonable range on the arrival date and no certainty of
the family name.

A major thank you to a lot of readers who contributed lots of good
thinking and time to help unravel this search. I am going to say a
broad thank you to everyone and I hope I do not offend anyone but I
have to single out two people, Yehudah ben Shlomo and Stephan Parnes
who played detective with me and gave graciously of their time and
skills. As a result in a matter of days the entire mystery was
unraveled.

The Morse tools did not work for this search. The Gold Form requires
when you enter a companion name that you also enter a surname and as
you will see the family name was so different on the list that it would
never have worked. Also the Gold Form is limited to Ellis Island and
>from the beginning I knew I might be searching Boston. The Morse
Boston search tool also fails in this search because it does not do
companions and even with the information in hand I tried a reverse
search (i.e. filling in elements of the known details) and it still was
unable to capture what would be the right results. Ancestry also seems
not to have a search for people with companions.

The clues for the mother and two children came >from the son's
naturalization papers in the 1920. He gave, as it turns out, the right
name of the ship and the right year but the wrong arrival month and
day. They came in about a month earlier than he says but his papers
gave no clue to the family name. While the thinking/hope is that it
would have been something with a "M" to follow their Americanized name
it in fact was with a "W".

With the name of the ship >from the naturalization papers and the year a
variety of searches were possible and it required reading the manifest
and spotting a woman named Sore with two young children and as it turns
out reading the Manifest shows she is going to her husband A. Morrison.

The husband was found in a more circuitous route because we did not
have the benefit of his naturalization papers. With the wife's
arrival we know the husband have come before her and we also knew his
youngest child's estimated birth in Russia which gave a nice search
range of just 5 years. Bu the real break was finding what appeared to
be his brother's naturalization papers. On the Declaration the brother
gave the wrong year of arrival but changed it on his Petition. Using
addresses permitted the logical assumption even though the family name
is common that they were in fact brothers. Searching the brother's
details yielded the results and then as it turns out when we finally
got the husband/father's naturalization papers it confirmed the results.

The brother's arrival said they were going to a cousin with an address
in Boston. A search of the Boston City Directory and some educated
guessing on converting a European to American name confirmed the
cousin's American name >from the address on the manifest. But even then
that did not convert to details on the cousin right away because again
it was a common name and Ancestry was getting hung up without enough
details. SO I used the 1910 and 1900 Boston City Directories (on line)
to establish addresses for the cousin and then ended up doing a manual
check of the Census using the addresses. And there was the cousin
living exactly where he should be and that gave the details to map out
the cousin's entire family too!

So the result showed there was no easy mother and child search feature
when so little information was known, but also showed that using the
variety of online databases, a lot of good guessing and perseverance
and the problem was solved. The key was the details on the
naturalization papers so if the son or brother had given the wrong ship
name we would never have gotten them I fear.

Again thanks to everyone who responded and encouraged this search along.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks Re: Immigrant search 1900-1907 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my original question which was
trying to find a way to search for a woman and two young children when
I only had a reasonable range on the arrival date and no certainty of
the family name.

A major thank you to a lot of readers who contributed lots of good
thinking and time to help unravel this search. I am going to say a
broad thank you to everyone and I hope I do not offend anyone but I
have to single out two people, Yehudah ben Shlomo and Stephan Parnes
who played detective with me and gave graciously of their time and
skills. As a result in a matter of days the entire mystery was
unraveled.

The Morse tools did not work for this search. The Gold Form requires
when you enter a companion name that you also enter a surname and as
you will see the family name was so different on the list that it would
never have worked. Also the Gold Form is limited to Ellis Island and
>from the beginning I knew I might be searching Boston. The Morse
Boston search tool also fails in this search because it does not do
companions and even with the information in hand I tried a reverse
search (i.e. filling in elements of the known details) and it still was
unable to capture what would be the right results. Ancestry also seems
not to have a search for people with companions.

The clues for the mother and two children came >from the son's
naturalization papers in the 1920. He gave, as it turns out, the right
name of the ship and the right year but the wrong arrival month and
day. They came in about a month earlier than he says but his papers
gave no clue to the family name. While the thinking/hope is that it
would have been something with a "M" to follow their Americanized name
it in fact was with a "W".

With the name of the ship >from the naturalization papers and the year a
variety of searches were possible and it required reading the manifest
and spotting a woman named Sore with two young children and as it turns
out reading the Manifest shows she is going to her husband A. Morrison.

The husband was found in a more circuitous route because we did not
have the benefit of his naturalization papers. With the wife's
arrival we know the husband have come before her and we also knew his
youngest child's estimated birth in Russia which gave a nice search
range of just 5 years. Bu the real break was finding what appeared to
be his brother's naturalization papers. On the Declaration the brother
gave the wrong year of arrival but changed it on his Petition. Using
addresses permitted the logical assumption even though the family name
is common that they were in fact brothers. Searching the brother's
details yielded the results and then as it turns out when we finally
got the husband/father's naturalization papers it confirmed the results.

The brother's arrival said they were going to a cousin with an address
in Boston. A search of the Boston City Directory and some educated
guessing on converting a European to American name confirmed the
cousin's American name >from the address on the manifest. But even then
that did not convert to details on the cousin right away because again
it was a common name and Ancestry was getting hung up without enough
details. SO I used the 1910 and 1900 Boston City Directories (on line)
to establish addresses for the cousin and then ended up doing a manual
check of the Census using the addresses. And there was the cousin
living exactly where he should be and that gave the details to map out
the cousin's entire family too!

So the result showed there was no easy mother and child search feature
when so little information was known, but also showed that using the
variety of online databases, a lot of good guessing and perseverance
and the problem was solved. The key was the details on the
naturalization papers so if the son or brother had given the wrong ship
name we would never have gotten them I fear.

Again thanks to everyone who responded and encouraged this search along.

Allan Jordan

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