Date   

Is Scarss a first name?? Is Scarss MOSS on your family tree? #general

Derek Stavrou
 

Shalom to the Group

I am tracing the family history of my ggggrandfather Samuel MOSS
(c1790-1871) and have found what I believe to be the entry for him and
his family on the 1841 UK census (Samuel, his wife Susan, each aged
45, and their 6 children, living at 4 Artillery Passage in Tower
Hamlets, London)
One intriguing feature of this record is the first name of one of the
children: Ancestry.com calls him "Scarp", but looking at the actual
census record, and with a vague memory of the trailing script of the
19th century, it could be that the name - possibly nickname or
diminutive?? - is Scarss.
So my question to the Group is whether anyone has come across the
personal name Scarss or Scarp in 19th century England - and,
especially, if anyone has Scarss/Scarp MOSS (born c.1826 in London)
in their family tree?

With thanks for any suggestions, and best wishes >from Israel.

Derek Stavrou
Kfar Sava, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Is Scarss a first name?? Is Scarss MOSS on your family tree? #general

Derek Stavrou
 

Shalom to the Group

I am tracing the family history of my ggggrandfather Samuel MOSS
(c1790-1871) and have found what I believe to be the entry for him and
his family on the 1841 UK census (Samuel, his wife Susan, each aged
45, and their 6 children, living at 4 Artillery Passage in Tower
Hamlets, London)
One intriguing feature of this record is the first name of one of the
children: Ancestry.com calls him "Scarp", but looking at the actual
census record, and with a vague memory of the trailing script of the
19th century, it could be that the name - possibly nickname or
diminutive?? - is Scarss.
So my question to the Group is whether anyone has come across the
personal name Scarss or Scarp in 19th century England - and,
especially, if anyone has Scarss/Scarp MOSS (born c.1826 in London)
in their family tree?

With thanks for any suggestions, and best wishes >from Israel.

Derek Stavrou
Kfar Sava, Israel


How to find Film/File numbers? #general

natrab@...
 

I am familiar with searching the (IGG) Italian Genealogy Group's
DataBase for vital records.
I have found records for Marriages & Deaths but they only have
certificate numbers.
How do I find the Film/File numbers?

Thanks, Rachel Bernstein, Yerushalayim


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to find Film/File numbers? #general

natrab@...
 

I am familiar with searching the (IGG) Italian Genealogy Group's
DataBase for vital records.
I have found records for Marriages & Deaths but they only have
certificate numbers.
How do I find the Film/File numbers?

Thanks, Rachel Bernstein, Yerushalayim


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Rabbi Zeev Wolf "Welwel Cahrif" HaCohen , Rabbi of Lask #rabbinic

Steven Bloom
 

Further investigation of the Lask records online shows clear
references to a rabbi named Wolf MICHALSON during the same time
period (early 1830's) . I don't know if this is the same as Wolf
BELCHATWOSKI, but I suspect that MICHALSON is the same as Zeev Wolf
Ha-Kohen, since his father's name was Yechiel Michel. Wolf MICHALSON
was married to Reyzl, and they had a daughter, Kaze, who married
Moshe David (son of Michel) Frenkel in Lask.
This Moshe David might be the grandson of Judah Ha-Levi Frenkel, if
I have the genealogy of that family correct.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Rabbi Zeev Wolf "Welwel Cahrif" HaCohen , Rabbi of Lask #rabbinic

Steven Bloom
 

I can add a bit of what I have found in rabbinic resources, duch as
encyclopedias and the like (Grinbaum's Chochmei Polin).

Zeev Wolf was the son of Yechiel, who in turn was the son of Shmuel
Lasker (I assume the last was not a true surname, but just indicates that the
family had been in Lask sinc ethe early 1700's or earlier).

He had a son, Nathan.

He died, if I translated right, in Shvat, 5598. or what would have
been early 1838. If this is the same individual as Wolf Belchatowski,
then he would
have been about 66 years old at his death. The Lask death records on
line seem to cut off in 1832, so no records of this death , whether they
were the same person or not, seem to be available, assuming the death
really was in 1838 and really was in or near Lask.

In looking at the on-line extracts of records at www.jri-poland.org,
it looks like there are some inconsistencies.
For instance, in later records for the couple you mentioned,
Zylberszac becomes Zylberstajn. Though there were prominent rabbinic families
of the region with both of those names, Zylberszac was more connected
with Lask, so thats probably the right name.

None of this really proves or disproves anything, but I thought that
knowing these facts will help you be able to reach a conclusion faster,
should you be able to find out more details regarding Wolf Belchatowski.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

Marriage record 1828 AKT 7 >from Lask, records the marriage of Szymche
ZYLBERSZATZ >from Rozprza to Chaia BELCHATOWSKA >from Lask.
The name of the bride's father as it appears in the record is Welek
BELCHATOWSKI, and his occupation is "pod Rabin" ("The Rabbi") .
His name, as a witness, appears in many other records in Lask from
those years.

In the translation of this record in JRI-Poland database there is a
comment that "bride's father is probably Velvel HaKohen Charif, Rabbi
of Lask".

I would appreciate any information supporting or disproving the above
comment.

Thank you for any help,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva

Please respond to: oferman@...


Re: Rabbi Zeev Wolf "Welwel Cahrif" HaCohen , Rabbi of Lask #rabbinic

Steven Bloom
 

I can add a bit of what I have found in rabbinic resources, duch as
encyclopedias and the like (Grinbaum's Chochmei Polin).

Zeev Wolf was the son of Yechiel, who in turn was the son of Shmuel
Lasker (I assume the last was not a true surname, but just indicates that the
family had been in Lask sinc ethe early 1700's or earlier).

He had a son, Nathan.

He died, if I translated right, in Shvat, 5598. or what would have
been early 1838. If this is the same individual as Wolf Belchatowski,
then he would
have been about 66 years old at his death. The Lask death records on
line seem to cut off in 1832, so no records of this death , whether they
were the same person or not, seem to be available, assuming the death
really was in 1838 and really was in or near Lask.

In looking at the on-line extracts of records at www.jri-poland.org,
it looks like there are some inconsistencies.
For instance, in later records for the couple you mentioned,
Zylberszac becomes Zylberstajn. Though there were prominent rabbinic families
of the region with both of those names, Zylberszac was more connected
with Lask, so thats probably the right name.

None of this really proves or disproves anything, but I thought that
knowing these facts will help you be able to reach a conclusion faster,
should you be able to find out more details regarding Wolf Belchatowski.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

Marriage record 1828 AKT 7 >from Lask, records the marriage of Szymche
ZYLBERSZATZ >from Rozprza to Chaia BELCHATOWSKA >from Lask.
The name of the bride's father as it appears in the record is Welek
BELCHATOWSKI, and his occupation is "pod Rabin" ("The Rabbi") .
His name, as a witness, appears in many other records in Lask from
those years.

In the translation of this record in JRI-Poland database there is a
comment that "bride's father is probably Velvel HaKohen Charif, Rabbi
of Lask".

I would appreciate any information supporting or disproving the above
comment.

Thank you for any help,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva

Please respond to: oferman@...


Re: Rabbi Zeev Wolf "Welwel Cahrif" HaCohen , Rabbi of Lask #rabbinic

Steven Bloom
 

Further investigation of the Lask records online shows clear
references to a rabbi named Wolf MICHALSON during the same time
period (early 1830's) . I don't know if this is the same as Wolf
BELCHATWOSKI, but I suspect that MICHALSON is the same as Zeev Wolf
Ha-Kohen, since his father's name was Yechiel Michel. Wolf MICHALSON
was married to Reyzl, and they had a daughter, Kaze, who married
Moshe David (son of Michel) Frenkel in Lask.
This Moshe David might be the grandson of Judah Ha-Levi Frenkel, if
I have the genealogy of that family correct.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


[European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #latvia

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 27 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 27 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 27 different national data protection and
privacy laws. . A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the
"right to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data
to delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-research-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Latvia SIG #Latvia [European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #latvia

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 27 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 27 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 27 different national data protection and
privacy laws. . A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the
"right to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data
to delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-research-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Steven Bloom
 

The "core" test that 23andme offers is an autosomal test. That is,
they match you with potential cousins along *any* branch (not just
maternal or paternal direct lines), most reliably within about 5
generations >from the common ancestor.Ftdna offers a very similar test,
as do some others. You probably won't find out how most folks really
connect to you, but if you workhard at your paper genealogy, and
pursue your dna matches, you'll likely connect with someone eventually
(see below for my successes).

They (23andme) do also give you information (but no detailed data) on
your maternal and paternal haplogroups, if you do not already know
that. However, no attempt is made to *match* you by haplogroup to
anybody (though,amongst your autosomal matches, you can see how many
match you by maternal or paternal haplo, and that *might* have
something to do with how you match). I believe this is at fairly low
resolution (in your terms).

I don't know as though there is any huge advantage for using them
over anybody else, other than getting matched to some folks who
wouldn't test with the other companies (but then the same coudl be
said of ftdna, etc.). Its certainly all very reliable, and I have
been matched to two new documented cousins (and have some good leads)
via 23andme (I have also tested with ftdna).

So, I wouldn't say there is a "catch". Its just a matter of knowing
what you are getting, and comparing it in detail with what other
companies offer. Usually, when a company charges less, its because
maybe they are giving less, but in my experience with 23andme,
that doesn't really seem to be so. For some services though, you
might have to sign up for their "subscription" (a few bucks extra a
month). You'll have to read up on that and see what exactly it is.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

At 02:04 AM 7/20/2013, you wrote:

Many years ago I had an Oxford Ancestors DNA test, at the time it cost
a lot of money but the information it gave me was excellent and it was
enough to submit to online projects through which over the years I
have continued to learn more. I noticed today that a 23andme test is
only $99.00 and so am I wondering what more I could learn >from this
test that I don't already know; can the information returned be
submitted to other databases/projects and to what resolution re the
mitochondrial and Y tests provided. It seems to be substantially
cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic Project so I am
wondering what the catch is.
Ben Forman


DNA Research #DNA Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Steven Bloom
 

The "core" test that 23andme offers is an autosomal test. That is,
they match you with potential cousins along *any* branch (not just
maternal or paternal direct lines), most reliably within about 5
generations >from the common ancestor.Ftdna offers a very similar test,
as do some others. You probably won't find out how most folks really
connect to you, but if you workhard at your paper genealogy, and
pursue your dna matches, you'll likely connect with someone eventually
(see below for my successes).

They (23andme) do also give you information (but no detailed data) on
your maternal and paternal haplogroups, if you do not already know
that. However, no attempt is made to *match* you by haplogroup to
anybody (though,amongst your autosomal matches, you can see how many
match you by maternal or paternal haplo, and that *might* have
something to do with how you match). I believe this is at fairly low
resolution (in your terms).

I don't know as though there is any huge advantage for using them
over anybody else, other than getting matched to some folks who
wouldn't test with the other companies (but then the same coudl be
said of ftdna, etc.). Its certainly all very reliable, and I have
been matched to two new documented cousins (and have some good leads)
via 23andme (I have also tested with ftdna).

So, I wouldn't say there is a "catch". Its just a matter of knowing
what you are getting, and comparing it in detail with what other
companies offer. Usually, when a company charges less, its because
maybe they are giving less, but in my experience with 23andme,
that doesn't really seem to be so. For some services though, you
might have to sign up for their "subscription" (a few bucks extra a
month). You'll have to read up on that and see what exactly it is.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

At 02:04 AM 7/20/2013, you wrote:

Many years ago I had an Oxford Ancestors DNA test, at the time it cost
a lot of money but the information it gave me was excellent and it was
enough to submit to online projects through which over the years I
have continued to learn more. I noticed today that a 23andme test is
only $99.00 and so am I wondering what more I could learn >from this
test that I don't already know; can the information returned be
submitted to other databases/projects and to what resolution re the
mitochondrial and Y tests provided. It seems to be substantially
cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic Project so I am
wondering what the catch is.
Ben Forman


Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2013, Ben Forman <ben.r.forman@...> asked:

It seems to be substantially cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic
Project so I am wondering what the catch is.
Hi Ben,

I use both 23andme and FamilyTreeDNA.

If anything, I surmise the "catch" is that the userbase of 23andme is smaller
than that of FamilyTreeDNA, so of course they're trying to increase it. But
FamilyTreeDNA periodically has sales too (experience shows they often have a
discount during August).

23andme provides all this medical information. I have found a
not-so-distant-but-hitherto-unknown relative through 23andme. But I've also
found good information >from FamilyTreeDNA (as well as potential close-
but-not-documented-relatives).

I lean more towards FamilyTreeDNA because they have a lot more documentation
(not >from the DNA but helps you contextualize it), but I'm happy to use both
vendors.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


DNA Research #DNA Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2013, Ben Forman <ben.r.forman@...> asked:

It seems to be substantially cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic
Project so I am wondering what the catch is.
Hi Ben,

I use both 23andme and FamilyTreeDNA.

If anything, I surmise the "catch" is that the userbase of 23andme is smaller
than that of FamilyTreeDNA, so of course they're trying to increase it. But
FamilyTreeDNA periodically has sales too (experience shows they often have a
discount during August).

23andme provides all this medical information. I have found a
not-so-distant-but-hitherto-unknown relative through 23andme. But I've also
found good information >from FamilyTreeDNA (as well as potential close-
but-not-documented-relatives).

I lean more towards FamilyTreeDNA because they have a lot more documentation
(not >from the DNA but helps you contextualize it), but I'm happy to use both
vendors.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Gesher Galicia at the IAJGS Conference #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

This year Gesher Galicia is celebrating our 20th anniversary at the IAJGS
Conference. We are sponsoring the research team of Alexander and
Natalie Dunai who will be accompanied by their daughter, "little Natalie,"
so make sure to give her a friendly welcome if you see her at the programs.

If you are new to Galician research, or not yet sure if you have Galician
roots but want to find out more, and curious about unusual records,
Ukrainian archives, clever ways to research, or the exciting world of
cadastral maps (which exist for the entire Austro-Hungarian Empire,
not just Galicia,) we hope you will attend our programs which are not
"just" for Galitzianers.

Join us at the Share Fair on Sunday >from 1:30PM - 5:00PM. We will
display maps and records, new GG merchandise and books, and have
experts to help with your research questions. Jay Osborn, who
coordinates our Cadastral Map Room, will be available >from 2:30PM -
3:00PM and 4:30PM - 5:00PM to discuss the intricacies of
map-stitching (and putting the resulting large files online) with anyone
interested.

If you want to attend the GG luncheon on Monday - with former US
Ambassador to Poland, Lee A. Feinstein - or the the Galician
Breakfast-with-the Experts on Tuesday with myself and Alex Dunai,
you must purchase a ticket by Wednesday, July 24. That's the cut-off.
Everyone attending the GG luncheon or breakfast will get a 20th
anniversary GG souvenir!

Below are programs sponsored by Gesher Galicia and/or those
presented by our members and/or town leaders. (Although our official
GG SIG day is Monday, every day offers a talk on a Galician topic. Plan
to stay until Friday for two special presentations.)

Sunday, August 4

9:30AM - Tabula Registers: A Untapped Genealogical Resource in the
Lviv Archives - Alexander Dunai

Monday, August 5

8:15AM - Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family
- Andrew Zalewski
9:45AM - Using the New Gesher Galicia Website to Research Towns
and Families - Brooke Schreier Ganz
11:00AM - Cadastral Maps, Landowner, School & Voter Records: New
Horizons for Genealogists - Pamela Weisberger
12:30PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Luncheon - Ambassador Lee A. Feinstein
2:00PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration
- a selection of scintillating speakers
3:30PM - Archival Resources for the Interwar Years in Western Ukraine
- Alexander & Natalie Dunai
5:00PM - Polish Magnate Landowner Records: Bringing "The Lords'
Jews" to Life - Pamela Weisberger & Natalie Dunai

Tuesday, August 6

7:00AM - Breakfast with Experts: Researching Your Roots in Galicia
- Pamela Weisberger & Alexander Dunai
9:45AM - Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society BOF Meeting
- Laurence Kirsch
11:15AM - Research in Congress Poland and Galicia: Working with
Vital records and More - Mark Halpern & Judy Baston

Wednesday, August 7

8:15AM - Shtetl Travel Throughout Ukraine - Alexander Dunai
2:00PM - Brody BOF - Ami Elyasaf
5:00PM - Rohatyn BOF - Alex Feller

Thursday, August 8

2:00PM - Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch
3:30PM - Suchostaw Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch

Friday, August 9

8:15AM - The Horn Identity: Historic Academic Records Re-Construct
the Lives of Two Galician Sisters >from Rohatyn - Marla Raucher Osborn
9:30AM - Mining Archival Treasures: Unique and Unusual Resources in
Galician Research - Pamela Weisberger

We have arranged to videotape all of our Monday
presentations including the luncheon and SIG meeting. The DVDs will
be available for sale at the conference, or through Conference
Recordings post-conference, and will be offered as a free
members-only viewing option in the fall on our website.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
pweisberger@...


Gesher Galicia at the IAJGS Conference #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

This year Gesher Galicia is celebrating our 20th anniversary at the IAJGS
Conference. We are sponsoring the research team of Alexander and
Natalie Dunai who will be accompanied by their daughter, "little Natalie,"
so make sure to give her a friendly welcome if you see her at the programs.

If you are new to Galician research, or not yet sure if you have Galician
roots but want to find out more, and curious about unusual records,
Ukrainian archives, clever ways to research, or the exciting world of
cadastral maps (which exist for the entire Austro-Hungarian Empire,
not just Galicia,) we hope you will attend our programs which are not
"just" for Galitzianers.

Join us at the Share Fair on Sunday >from 1:30PM - 5:00PM. We will
display maps and records, new GG merchandise and books, and have
experts to help with your research questions. Jay Osborn, who
coordinates our Cadastral Map Room, will be available >from 2:30PM -
3:00PM and 4:30PM - 5:00PM to discuss the intricacies of
map-stitching (and putting the resulting large files online) with anyone
interested.

If you want to attend the GG luncheon on Monday - with former US
Ambassador to Poland, Lee A. Feinstein - or the the Galician
Breakfast-with-the Experts on Tuesday with myself and Alex Dunai,
you must purchase a ticket by Wednesday, July 24. That's the cut-off.
Everyone attending the GG luncheon or breakfast will get a 20th
anniversary GG souvenir!

Below are programs sponsored by Gesher Galicia and/or those
presented by our members and/or town leaders. (Although our official
GG SIG day is Monday, every day offers a talk on a Galician topic. Plan
to stay until Friday for two special presentations.)

Sunday, August 4

9:30AM - Tabula Registers: A Untapped Genealogical Resource in the
Lviv Archives - Alexander Dunai

Monday, August 5

8:15AM - Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family
- Andrew Zalewski
9:45AM - Using the New Gesher Galicia Website to Research Towns
and Families - Brooke Schreier Ganz
11:00AM - Cadastral Maps, Landowner, School & Voter Records: New
Horizons for Genealogists - Pamela Weisberger
12:30PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Luncheon - Ambassador Lee A. Feinstein
2:00PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration
- a selection of scintillating speakers
3:30PM - Archival Resources for the Interwar Years in Western Ukraine
- Alexander & Natalie Dunai
5:00PM - Polish Magnate Landowner Records: Bringing "The Lords'
Jews" to Life - Pamela Weisberger & Natalie Dunai

Tuesday, August 6

7:00AM - Breakfast with Experts: Researching Your Roots in Galicia
- Pamela Weisberger & Alexander Dunai
9:45AM - Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society BOF Meeting
- Laurence Kirsch
11:15AM - Research in Congress Poland and Galicia: Working with
Vital records and More - Mark Halpern & Judy Baston

Wednesday, August 7

8:15AM - Shtetl Travel Throughout Ukraine - Alexander Dunai
2:00PM - Brody BOF - Ami Elyasaf
5:00PM - Rohatyn BOF - Alex Feller

Thursday, August 8

2:00PM - Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch
3:30PM - Suchostaw Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch

Friday, August 9

8:15AM - The Horn Identity: Historic Academic Records Re-Construct
the Lives of Two Galician Sisters >from Rohatyn - Marla Raucher Osborn
9:30AM - Mining Archival Treasures: Unique and Unusual Resources in
Galician Research - Pamela Weisberger

We have arranged to videotape all of our Monday
presentations including the luncheon and SIG meeting. The DVDs will
be available for sale at the conference, or through Conference
Recordings post-conference, and will be offered as a free
members-only viewing option in the fall on our website.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
pweisberger@...


Romania SIG #Romania SMILOWITZ, PAISS, GOLDFELD #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am researching Nathan & Esther SMILOWITZ (Buhusi), Morris PAISS
(Neamtz), and Leon & Sarah GOLDFELD (Bucharest), Romanian citizens
1880's thru approximately 1913 when they immigrated to Philadelphia.
More specifically, I am trying to discover Sarah Goldfeld's maiden
name and the connection between the Smilowitz, Paiss and Goldfeld
families. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Scott Whitman

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so then you should
enter your family names and towns into the JewishGen Family Finder:
<www.jewishgen.org/jgff> This site is searched daily by hundreds
who may find your data and see a connection.


SMILOWITZ, PAISS, GOLDFELD #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am researching Nathan & Esther SMILOWITZ (Buhusi), Morris PAISS
(Neamtz), and Leon & Sarah GOLDFELD (Bucharest), Romanian citizens
1880's thru approximately 1913 when they immigrated to Philadelphia.
More specifically, I am trying to discover Sarah Goldfeld's maiden
name and the connection between the Smilowitz, Paiss and Goldfeld
families. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Scott Whitman

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so then you should
enter your family names and towns into the JewishGen Family Finder:
<www.jewishgen.org/jgff> This site is searched daily by hundreds
who may find your data and see a connection.


[European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 28 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 28 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 28 different national data protection and
privacy laws. A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the "right
to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data to
delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-res
earch-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Early American SIG #USA [European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 28 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 28 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 28 different national data protection and
privacy laws. A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the "right
to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data to
delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-res
earch-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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