Date   

E-mail address in Israel #general

Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm trying to join Noam COHN, living in Israel, whose great-grandfather was
Moise BEHMOIRAS, but my mail was rejected because of a "permanent failure".
Does anybody knows how to joint Noam COHN? Please respond privately.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen E-mail address in Israel #general

Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm trying to join Noam COHN, living in Israel, whose great-grandfather was
Moise BEHMOIRAS, but my mail was rejected because of a "permanent failure".
Does anybody knows how to joint Noam COHN? Please respond privately.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org


Re: Pennsylvania Death Indices 1906-1961 #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Dennis - Thanks for the info. If you happen to know of anyone who has
taken those Pennsylvania index files and put them through OCR software so
that they could be searchable, I would appreciate knowing. Otherwise, I'll
try doing it myself.

As an aside, I've seen several people asking about why can't the
Pennsylvania certificates be digitized and put up on the web. I should
mention that here in Massachusetts, that the state archives made an
agreement with familysearch.org to have 5 years worth of vital records,
i.e. marriages, births, and deaths for the period of 1915-1920, to be
digitized. Most of the records were certificates, rather than on
microfilm. Because of that, the project is taking 18 months to do.
Imagine how long 50 years of records would take to be digitized! If they
were on microfilm, I'm sure it would take much quicker, but >from everything
I've read, the Pennsylvania microfilm are not in good shape -

Mark London
"Dennis Gries" <dgries@...> wrote

Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 07:28:53 -0500

I earlier posted a news message with a link, and I have learned that my cut
and paste >from the PAHR-Access site required some extra steps.

This takes one directly to the Death Index years selection page:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=1085804&mode=2

The one below requires selection of "Health", then "Online Genealogical...",
and a couple more. I was trying to keep the link simple.

To repeat:
The PA law requiring the Dept of Health to give the State Archives death
records over 50 years old became law on Feb 13.

The Dept of Health has cooperated in a good first step by creating a web
site: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/
Each year >from 1906 thru 1961 is a separate "clickable year."
The click returns a choice of several large pdf files for each year, and
from that is either a conventional alphabetic listing with surname, first
name, death place, date, and cert number, or a soundex listing with first
name, surname, death place, date, and cert number.

The DofH offers an order system for a copy at $3 with a 16-18 week delivery
time.

This is an evolving process and see www.pahr-access.org for more info.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pennsylvania Death Indices 1906-1961 #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Dennis - Thanks for the info. If you happen to know of anyone who has
taken those Pennsylvania index files and put them through OCR software so
that they could be searchable, I would appreciate knowing. Otherwise, I'll
try doing it myself.

As an aside, I've seen several people asking about why can't the
Pennsylvania certificates be digitized and put up on the web. I should
mention that here in Massachusetts, that the state archives made an
agreement with familysearch.org to have 5 years worth of vital records,
i.e. marriages, births, and deaths for the period of 1915-1920, to be
digitized. Most of the records were certificates, rather than on
microfilm. Because of that, the project is taking 18 months to do.
Imagine how long 50 years of records would take to be digitized! If they
were on microfilm, I'm sure it would take much quicker, but >from everything
I've read, the Pennsylvania microfilm are not in good shape -

Mark London
"Dennis Gries" <dgries@...> wrote

Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 07:28:53 -0500

I earlier posted a news message with a link, and I have learned that my cut
and paste >from the PAHR-Access site required some extra steps.

This takes one directly to the Death Index years selection page:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=1085804&mode=2

The one below requires selection of "Health", then "Online Genealogical...",
and a couple more. I was trying to keep the link simple.

To repeat:
The PA law requiring the Dept of Health to give the State Archives death
records over 50 years old became law on Feb 13.

The Dept of Health has cooperated in a good first step by creating a web
site: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/
Each year >from 1906 thru 1961 is a separate "clickable year."
The click returns a choice of several large pdf files for each year, and
from that is either a conventional alphabetic listing with surname, first
name, death place, date, and cert number, or a soundex listing with first
name, surname, death place, date, and cert number.

The DofH offers an order system for a copy at $3 with a 16-18 week delivery
time.

This is an evolving process and see www.pahr-access.org for more info.


Re: Probate records - don't over look these treasures #general

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Allan Jordan wrote
>The case I did yesterday again one of the two files was several inches
>thick and had lots of papers. The man died in the early 1930s and in
>addition to his will there was an accounting of his property and even
>annual financial records >from a rental property before they liquidated
>the estate after World War II. But the real treasure was a certified
>document >from the USSR >from the man's sister competed in the 1940s after
>World War II. It is in both the Cyrillic as well as English and has the
>woman's full name and even a street address. She had to take it to a
>local magistrate in her town who certified her signature, and then the
>local court in Russia certified the magistrate and then the local
official
>certified the court and then the central government certified the local
>official and then the embassy certified that it came >from the central
>government. The document has the original tax stamps and everything.
>It was a thrill to see and I am not even related to this family!

It was my family's records that Allan pulled and it was thrilling to me to
read the documents. I want to describe other things he found in those
records. First, he pulled two sets of records for two of my great-great
grandfathers. The executor of both of them was the same - the son of one
and the son-in-law of the other - my great grandfather.

Both the wills and probate records were there. In addition to the
information to which Allan referred on that certified document was the
discovery that this woman was my gggrandfather's sister - we thought she
was his niece. We were able to clearly see how her name was written in
Cyrillic, not only in the English transliteration which will be a help in
uncovering European documents. Since her patronymic was part of her name,
we had confirmation of what their father's name was.

Among the huge stack that Allan sent were the listings of beneficiaries
which included, for one of these men, two places in Belarus with their
addresses and a thank you note >from one of them. Also there on the first
page of the probate record were all the ways one of my gggrandfathers was
known in the U.S. - there were 6 different ways his name was spelled. We
already knew some of them but not all of them.

The beneficiaries and their relationships to the decedents were listed,
which told us that a 2nd woman we thought was a niece was a sister and also
that a son we thought had died later had predeceased him. My head is
spinning with the changes I need to make to some of my data - fixing
relationships. But I also have addresses now for just about everyone in
the family in the 1930's.

This was clearly an invaluable resource, and I thank Allan for the time he
spent on my behalf, and urge everyone not to forget wills and probate records!

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Probate records - don't over look these treasures #general

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Allan Jordan wrote
>The case I did yesterday again one of the two files was several inches
>thick and had lots of papers. The man died in the early 1930s and in
>addition to his will there was an accounting of his property and even
>annual financial records >from a rental property before they liquidated
>the estate after World War II. But the real treasure was a certified
>document >from the USSR >from the man's sister competed in the 1940s after
>World War II. It is in both the Cyrillic as well as English and has the
>woman's full name and even a street address. She had to take it to a
>local magistrate in her town who certified her signature, and then the
>local court in Russia certified the magistrate and then the local
official
>certified the court and then the central government certified the local
>official and then the embassy certified that it came >from the central
>government. The document has the original tax stamps and everything.
>It was a thrill to see and I am not even related to this family!

It was my family's records that Allan pulled and it was thrilling to me to
read the documents. I want to describe other things he found in those
records. First, he pulled two sets of records for two of my great-great
grandfathers. The executor of both of them was the same - the son of one
and the son-in-law of the other - my great grandfather.

Both the wills and probate records were there. In addition to the
information to which Allan referred on that certified document was the
discovery that this woman was my gggrandfather's sister - we thought she
was his niece. We were able to clearly see how her name was written in
Cyrillic, not only in the English transliteration which will be a help in
uncovering European documents. Since her patronymic was part of her name,
we had confirmation of what their father's name was.

Among the huge stack that Allan sent were the listings of beneficiaries
which included, for one of these men, two places in Belarus with their
addresses and a thank you note >from one of them. Also there on the first
page of the probate record were all the ways one of my gggrandfathers was
known in the U.S. - there were 6 different ways his name was spelled. We
already knew some of them but not all of them.

The beneficiaries and their relationships to the decedents were listed,
which told us that a 2nd woman we thought was a niece was a sister and also
that a son we thought had died later had predeceased him. My head is
spinning with the changes I need to make to some of my data - fixing
relationships. But I also have addresses now for just about everyone in
the family in the 1930's.

This was clearly an invaluable resource, and I thank Allan for the time he
spent on my behalf, and urge everyone not to forget wills and probate records!

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ


Nee Help with translation of letters in Old German Script #general

David Sperling
 

My name is David Sperling and I have letters in this last form of old
German script >from my Great Great Grandfather to his sons >from 1872. I
would like to get an idea of what they say and eventually get them
translated for detail.
Could anyone help me or does anyone know anyone who can?
You can reply to my email dssprl@...

David Sperling


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nee Help with translation of letters in Old German Script #general

David Sperling
 

My name is David Sperling and I have letters in this last form of old
German script >from my Great Great Grandfather to his sons >from 1872. I
would like to get an idea of what they say and eventually get them
translated for detail.
Could anyone help me or does anyone know anyone who can?
You can reply to my email dssprl@...

David Sperling


Re: Jewish naming in upper Franconia 18th century #germany

Ekkehard Huebschmann <info@...>
 

Dear Judith!
The Ashkenazi naming rules were followed in Franconia at that time
very strictly--till the 20th century. Therefore a son could only be
named after his father, if the father died before his--the
son's--birth. I came across such cases several times here in
Franconia.

Maybe another information could help. Dirk Rosenstock mentions in his
book "Die unterfraenkischen Judenmatrikel von 1817" (The Lower
Franconian Jew Register of 1817) (Wuerzburg 2008:240) for Schwanfeld,
Landgericht (County Court) Werneck not only Maier and Jockel, but
another obvious son of Salomon: Jakob Schlom.

Because the Judenmatrikel of the court district Werneck are missing in
the State Archive Wuerzburg, Rosenstock had to reconstruct them on the
base of other files. He lists:
-. Jakob Schlom, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, died 09 Feb 1821,
aged 56, was married
-. Maier Schloma, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, died 07 Nov 1829,
aged 59, wife: Gidel
3. Jockel Schlom, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, (b. 1776), aged
59 in 1833, wife: Hindel (b. 1780)

Note, that Jockel is not only the diminutive of Jakob, but as well of
Jonas. Therefore a Jacob can have a brother Jockel (Jonas). The
diminutive of Jakob, used by Jews in Franconia was Koppel.

Ekkehard Huebschmann <info@...> , professional genealogist,
Harsdorf/Upper Franconia Germany www.geepeetee.de

Judith Berlowitz Oakland, CA wrote:
In the Judische Standesregister, Geburten, are records for children of
three GATTMANN men born in Schwanfeld who could be Maier's and Felix's
father, all of them sons of Salomon GATTMANN (b. abt. 1740), and all
of them fathers of seven listed children: 1) Maier Schlomo, b. ca.
1770, 2) Jockel Schlomo (b. ca. 1774), and 3) Nihm, b. ca. 1785). I'm
ruling out Nihm, as he has a son called Meier, born in 1830. Jockel
has a daughter, Lena (Lina), born around 1811. The most likely
candidate for having two sons born before the earliest reported birth
year for his family (1814) is Maier Schlomo. But of course there is
the issue of naming the son after the father.


German SIG #Germany Re: Jewish naming in upper Franconia 18th century #germany

Ekkehard Huebschmann <info@...>
 

Dear Judith!
The Ashkenazi naming rules were followed in Franconia at that time
very strictly--till the 20th century. Therefore a son could only be
named after his father, if the father died before his--the
son's--birth. I came across such cases several times here in
Franconia.

Maybe another information could help. Dirk Rosenstock mentions in his
book "Die unterfraenkischen Judenmatrikel von 1817" (The Lower
Franconian Jew Register of 1817) (Wuerzburg 2008:240) for Schwanfeld,
Landgericht (County Court) Werneck not only Maier and Jockel, but
another obvious son of Salomon: Jakob Schlom.

Because the Judenmatrikel of the court district Werneck are missing in
the State Archive Wuerzburg, Rosenstock had to reconstruct them on the
base of other files. He lists:
-. Jakob Schlom, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, died 09 Feb 1821,
aged 56, was married
-. Maier Schloma, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, died 07 Nov 1829,
aged 59, wife: Gidel
3. Jockel Schlom, new name: Gattmann, cattle dealer, (b. 1776), aged
59 in 1833, wife: Hindel (b. 1780)

Note, that Jockel is not only the diminutive of Jakob, but as well of
Jonas. Therefore a Jacob can have a brother Jockel (Jonas). The
diminutive of Jakob, used by Jews in Franconia was Koppel.

Ekkehard Huebschmann <info@...> , professional genealogist,
Harsdorf/Upper Franconia Germany www.geepeetee.de

Judith Berlowitz Oakland, CA wrote:
In the Judische Standesregister, Geburten, are records for children of
three GATTMANN men born in Schwanfeld who could be Maier's and Felix's
father, all of them sons of Salomon GATTMANN (b. abt. 1740), and all
of them fathers of seven listed children: 1) Maier Schlomo, b. ca.
1770, 2) Jockel Schlomo (b. ca. 1774), and 3) Nihm, b. ca. 1785). I'm
ruling out Nihm, as he has a son called Meier, born in 1830. Jockel
has a daughter, Lena (Lina), born around 1811. The most likely
candidate for having two sons born before the earliest reported birth
year for his family (1814) is Maier Schlomo. But of course there is
the issue of naming the son after the father.


Seeking GUENZBURGER link #germany

Werner Frank
 

I have a GUENZBURGER branch starting with David GUENZBURGER. (1771-1846)
married to Judith LOEW (1784-1834), probably residing in Rust, Baden.
Three children are known: Loeb (d. 1860 in Rust), Karolina and Golas (b.1808).
The descendants married into the GRUMBACHER, SCHWAB and JOHL families.
I am seeking help in order to find a likely link of this David to the well
known GUENZBURGER family, notably >from Breisach and other communities of the
Breisgau and Ortenau.

Werner L. Frank, Calabasas CA USA


German SIG #Germany Seeking GUENZBURGER link #germany

Werner Frank
 

I have a GUENZBURGER branch starting with David GUENZBURGER. (1771-1846)
married to Judith LOEW (1784-1834), probably residing in Rust, Baden.
Three children are known: Loeb (d. 1860 in Rust), Karolina and Golas (b.1808).
The descendants married into the GRUMBACHER, SCHWAB and JOHL families.
I am seeking help in order to find a likely link of this David to the well
known GUENZBURGER family, notably >from Breisach and other communities of the
Breisgau and Ortenau.

Werner L. Frank, Calabasas CA USA


Prof. Nancy K. Miller to speak on "What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past" #bessarabia

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society invites you to attend its next meeting,
featuring Professor Nancy K. Miller speaking about her book, "What They Saved:
Pieces of a Jewish Past."

Sunday, February 19, 2012, 2:00 pm
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues
New York, NY

Program
Searching for roots as a middle-aged orphan and an assimilated Jewish New
Yorker, Nancy Miller found herself asking unexpected questions: Why do I
know so little about my family? How can I understand myself when I don't know
my past? The answers led her to a carpenter in Ukraine, a stationery peddler
on the Lower East Side, and a gangster hanger-on in the Bronx. As she slowly
pieced together her family portrait and assembled a genealogical tree, she
felt connected in unexpected ways to an immigrant narrative that began in
Eastern Europe at the turn of the twentieth century, when her ancestors
arrived in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In the end, her quest to
uncover the origins of her lost family becomes a memoir of renewal.

Professor Miller's story begins in Kishinev in the early years of the 20th
century and will be of special interest to those with roots in Bessarabia.

Currently a Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature
at the CUNY Graduate Center, Nancy K. Miller is the author of several books
on feminist criticism, women's writing, and most recently, family memoir,
biography, and trauma. A book-signing will follow the presentation.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the CJH will be open at
11:00 AM for net­working with other researchers and access to research
materials and computers.

The program is free to members of JGSNY; there is a $5 charge for guests.

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
Vice President, Programming
JGS, Inc. (NY)


Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Jane Neff Rollins
 

Hi fellow Bessarabians,

My great-grandfather, Isaac KISHINEVSKY, emigrated >from Tiraspol to Chicago
in 1896. Isaac had earned his living as a cigar maker, but was apparently
also a Talmudic scholar. His parents were Emanuel and Malka Kishinevsky, and
he had at least 3 brothers, all of whom came to Chicago: Moishe, Leib (both
of whom were also cigar makers), and Samuel.

Isaac's wife and 7 children (including Jacob Kishinevsky, my GF) joined him
in 1899. The family had shortened the name to NEVSKY by 1910, and to NEFF by
1917.

Great grandfather married Lena ZEILIKOVICH, whose father was Zelig Zeilikovich
and mother was Ester SIROTA. The Zeilikovich family was >from the rich
neighborhood, as they evidently owned land (planted in grapes and fruit) in
the agricultural colony of Zatische.

Do any of these names ring bells of recognition?

The name Kishinevsky means ">from Kishinev." Yet, my father's DNA matched most
closely only to people who came >from Lithuania (none of whom are named
Kishinevsky). This is a mystery yet to be solved.

Be well, do good work and stay in touch...

Jane Neff Rollins
La Crescenta CA USA

Researching: KISHINEVSKY, Tiraspol (then Bessarabia, now Transnistria);
ZEILIKOVICH, Tiraspol & Zatische; SIROTA, Tiraspol; KLEBANSKY, Slonim,
Belarus; VATNIK, Slonim; CHEIFETZ (by marriage), Volkovysk, Belarus;
PEKLER, Zhytomyr, Ukraine; GUMENIK, Zhytomyr, Ukraine; CHERNORUDSKY,
Berdichev, Ukraine


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Prof. Nancy K. Miller to speak on "What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past" #bessarabia

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society invites you to attend its next meeting,
featuring Professor Nancy K. Miller speaking about her book, "What They Saved:
Pieces of a Jewish Past."

Sunday, February 19, 2012, 2:00 pm
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues
New York, NY

Program
Searching for roots as a middle-aged orphan and an assimilated Jewish New
Yorker, Nancy Miller found herself asking unexpected questions: Why do I
know so little about my family? How can I understand myself when I don't know
my past? The answers led her to a carpenter in Ukraine, a stationery peddler
on the Lower East Side, and a gangster hanger-on in the Bronx. As she slowly
pieced together her family portrait and assembled a genealogical tree, she
felt connected in unexpected ways to an immigrant narrative that began in
Eastern Europe at the turn of the twentieth century, when her ancestors
arrived in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In the end, her quest to
uncover the origins of her lost family becomes a memoir of renewal.

Professor Miller's story begins in Kishinev in the early years of the 20th
century and will be of special interest to those with roots in Bessarabia.

Currently a Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature
at the CUNY Graduate Center, Nancy K. Miller is the author of several books
on feminist criticism, women's writing, and most recently, family memoir,
biography, and trauma. A book-signing will follow the presentation.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the CJH will be open at
11:00 AM for net­working with other researchers and access to research
materials and computers.

The program is free to members of JGSNY; there is a $5 charge for guests.

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
Vice President, Programming
JGS, Inc. (NY)


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Jane Neff Rollins
 

Hi fellow Bessarabians,

My great-grandfather, Isaac KISHINEVSKY, emigrated >from Tiraspol to Chicago
in 1896. Isaac had earned his living as a cigar maker, but was apparently
also a Talmudic scholar. His parents were Emanuel and Malka Kishinevsky, and
he had at least 3 brothers, all of whom came to Chicago: Moishe, Leib (both
of whom were also cigar makers), and Samuel.

Isaac's wife and 7 children (including Jacob Kishinevsky, my GF) joined him
in 1899. The family had shortened the name to NEVSKY by 1910, and to NEFF by
1917.

Great grandfather married Lena ZEILIKOVICH, whose father was Zelig Zeilikovich
and mother was Ester SIROTA. The Zeilikovich family was >from the rich
neighborhood, as they evidently owned land (planted in grapes and fruit) in
the agricultural colony of Zatische.

Do any of these names ring bells of recognition?

The name Kishinevsky means ">from Kishinev." Yet, my father's DNA matched most
closely only to people who came >from Lithuania (none of whom are named
Kishinevsky). This is a mystery yet to be solved.

Be well, do good work and stay in touch...

Jane Neff Rollins
La Crescenta CA USA

Researching: KISHINEVSKY, Tiraspol (then Bessarabia, now Transnistria);
ZEILIKOVICH, Tiraspol & Zatische; SIROTA, Tiraspol; KLEBANSKY, Slonim,
Belarus; VATNIK, Slonim; CHEIFETZ (by marriage), Volkovysk, Belarus;
PEKLER, Zhytomyr, Ukraine; GUMENIK, Zhytomyr, Ukraine; CHERNORUDSKY,
Berdichev, Ukraine


Re more on Lwow school question asked by Henryk Gruder #galicia

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

Hello again,

In further reply to the recent question asked by Henryk Gruder about
finding inter-War Lviv academic records, I wanted to add that these
records are kept at Lviv's DALO archives (Oblast archive), located
near the book sellers outdoor market, off the main Rynek.

If one knows the years of attendance at a particular school (as I did
for Rohatyn sisters Bronia and Jute HORN), you can retain a local
researcher to request these records for you >from DALO. In my case,
it cost me a couple of hours of the researcher's time, and I received
several digital images of the sisters' records as students. More
importantly, these records revealed a lot of genealogical and
historical information: their father's occupation in Rohatyn, what
courses they took and how they fared, and where they lived in Lviv
while attending school. Armed with this latter information, I set out
to photograph their residences and neighborhoods - so little
changed since the 1920s!

There are a number of known, reputable local Lviv researchers who
can do this research for you at DALO.

Hope this helps,

Marla Raucher Osborn
Krakow-bound for three months,
then returning to Paris in mid-June 2012
(formerly in Lviv, Ukraine during 2011)

osborn@...

Researching HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING, KURZROCK >from Rohatyn
and TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, Western Ukraine); SILBER
from Ulanow and Sokolow Malapolski (Poland); BLECHER >from Soroka,
Bessarabia (Moldova); BRUNSHTEIN/BROWNSTEIN/BRONSTEIN,
SARFAS/CHARFAS, FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets
Podilskyy (Ukraine); FRANKENBERG >from Vilnius (Lithuania);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER, KESTENBAUM/KOSTENBAUM/KASTENBAUM
from Przemysl (Poland)
Henryk Gruder asked:

"Does anybody know about Lvov's II Gymnasium (Karol Szajnocha)?
What age students entered? Are any pictures of the students
preserved? Any information about Lvov's Politechnika?"


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re more on Lwow school question asked by Henryk Gruder #galicia

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

Hello again,

In further reply to the recent question asked by Henryk Gruder about
finding inter-War Lviv academic records, I wanted to add that these
records are kept at Lviv's DALO archives (Oblast archive), located
near the book sellers outdoor market, off the main Rynek.

If one knows the years of attendance at a particular school (as I did
for Rohatyn sisters Bronia and Jute HORN), you can retain a local
researcher to request these records for you >from DALO. In my case,
it cost me a couple of hours of the researcher's time, and I received
several digital images of the sisters' records as students. More
importantly, these records revealed a lot of genealogical and
historical information: their father's occupation in Rohatyn, what
courses they took and how they fared, and where they lived in Lviv
while attending school. Armed with this latter information, I set out
to photograph their residences and neighborhoods - so little
changed since the 1920s!

There are a number of known, reputable local Lviv researchers who
can do this research for you at DALO.

Hope this helps,

Marla Raucher Osborn
Krakow-bound for three months,
then returning to Paris in mid-June 2012
(formerly in Lviv, Ukraine during 2011)

osborn@...

Researching HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING, KURZROCK >from Rohatyn
and TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, Western Ukraine); SILBER
from Ulanow and Sokolow Malapolski (Poland); BLECHER >from Soroka,
Bessarabia (Moldova); BRUNSHTEIN/BROWNSTEIN/BRONSTEIN,
SARFAS/CHARFAS, FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets
Podilskyy (Ukraine); FRANKENBERG >from Vilnius (Lithuania);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER, KESTENBAUM/KOSTENBAUM/KASTENBAUM
from Przemysl (Poland)
Henryk Gruder asked:

"Does anybody know about Lvov's II Gymnasium (Karol Szajnocha)?
What age students entered? Are any pictures of the students
preserved? Any information about Lvov's Politechnika?"


Re: Lvov II Gymnasium #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Henryk Gruder asked, "Does anybody know about Lvov's II
Gymnasium (Karol Szajnocha)?"

Lvov II Gymnasium is one of many Galician schools for which
pre-WWII annual reports are available online, often listing students.
It is also among the small (but growing) percentage of those schools
with online reports that I have added to my search engine at
http://genealogyindexer.org (I plan to add the rest). You can see the
full list of searchable school reports at
http://genealogyindexer.org/school, which includes Lvov II reports
called "Sprawozdanie Dyrekcji Panstwowego Gimnazjum II im. Karola
Szajnochy we Lwowie" for the years 1873, 1875-77, 1881, 1884,
1886, 1887, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1897-1903, 1905-1913,
1920/21, 1928/29. To search only the school reports on the site, and
exclude business directories and other items, change "Any Collection"
to "School" in the dropdown menu below the search box at the top.

I have made these reports searchable using OCR, which is not 100%
accurate. If you are only interested in a few known years/schools,
you might consider browsing reports manually, following the links at
http://genealogyindexer.org/school. To view the reports, you might
need to first install a .DjVu plugin for your web browser, e.g., from
http://www.caminova.net/en/downloads/download.aspx?id=1 .

Note that the All Galicia Database at http://search.geshergalicia.org
also includes Galician school reports, though none >from Lvov II.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Lvov II Gymnasium #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Henryk Gruder asked, "Does anybody know about Lvov's II
Gymnasium (Karol Szajnocha)?"

Lvov II Gymnasium is one of many Galician schools for which
pre-WWII annual reports are available online, often listing students.
It is also among the small (but growing) percentage of those schools
with online reports that I have added to my search engine at
http://genealogyindexer.org (I plan to add the rest). You can see the
full list of searchable school reports at
http://genealogyindexer.org/school, which includes Lvov II reports
called "Sprawozdanie Dyrekcji Panstwowego Gimnazjum II im. Karola
Szajnochy we Lwowie" for the years 1873, 1875-77, 1881, 1884,
1886, 1887, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1897-1903, 1905-1913,
1920/21, 1928/29. To search only the school reports on the site, and
exclude business directories and other items, change "Any Collection"
to "School" in the dropdown menu below the search box at the top.

I have made these reports searchable using OCR, which is not 100%
accurate. If you are only interested in a few known years/schools,
you might consider browsing reports manually, following the links at
http://genealogyindexer.org/school. To view the reports, you might
need to first install a .DjVu plugin for your web browser, e.g., from
http://www.caminova.net/en/downloads/download.aspx?id=1 .

Note that the All Galicia Database at http://search.geshergalicia.org
also includes Galician school reports, though none >from Lvov II.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.