Date   

New On-Line Resources for German-Jewish Family Research #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear GerSIG friends:

What an exhilarating week it's been! The IAJGS conference in my home
town of Vashinkten, DeSea (as a legendary entry to the FamilyFinder once
had it) brought insight, reunions, new friendships, opportunities for
projects and many more joys in a stream that seemed unending.

All five of GerSIG's directors (we used to be coordinators) were there,
and so were more than 100 enthusiastic members of our group. Hans Hirsch
celebrated his 95th birthday, Allan Hirsh his 91st; Alex Calzareth
announced a milestone in the Aufbau Indexing Project and I got to rattle
on about GerSIG's first ongoing database project, the Name Adoption List
inDEX, aka NALDEX.

Some of that rattling came during my presentation about new and
not-so-new Web resources. In exchange for neither showing nor reading
aloud the URLs of the sites I displayed, I promised to post those URLs
as soon as possible. Here we go, in no particular order:

First of all, there are the many not-so-new sites that some of us
haven't used yet.

http://wikipedia.org
is something I consult every day. Along with its
many other uses, it's very handy for finding the modern names of towns
no longer in Germany. Here's one way: >from the global start page (the
URL given here), put in a town name and select Deutsch as your language
of choice. This should take you to a wikipedia.de page with the town's
modern name as its title. If you don't speak enough German yet, go to
the sidebar and click on the "English" link that's almost certainly
there--and you've found your English-language page for the town.
Perhaps a little roundabout, but the German 'pedia is the best at
redirecting >from older names to new.

http://www.verwaltungsgeschichte.de/
is Michael Rademacher's German historical gazetteer.
Nothing fancy here, not even a search function--just the administrative
structure of the entire Reich as it was before and after WW I, plus many
other useful features.

There's a page for every Kreis (county); that page contains the name
of every city, town and village in the Kreis, with population figures >from
various times (often broken down by religion), descriptions of the
larger cities, links to provincial government, courts, military and
religious units, etc. Click on "Ortsbuch" and away you go. Ancient web
technology, timeless info.

http://gov.genealogy.net/
is part of a German-language wiki devoted to genealogy. It does much
of the same work as Rademacher's site, but with search functions and
some nice graphical representations of how the governmental
hierarchies worked over time.

Among actual databases of names are:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en
-- the German memorial book -- is unique. Most of the information
is also available via http://www.yadvashem.org/, but this site is
updated frequently, and those in charge are willing to accept corrections
and fix entries.

http://adressbuch.zlb.de/ -- the Berlin address books.
Click on "Suche [etc.]" to search, pick a time period, then a year,
then section I. for that year, then a letter of the alphabet.
from there, it's like using, well, an address or phone directory.
Date range is 1799-1943.

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en
is the Polish State Archives vital records sources database.
English-language search page, menu boxes and results in Polish;
but the help pages (links in the sidebar) explain the key terms, including
the Polish word for "Jewish." Well, at least the one that the PSA uses.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/
has fascinating pages about many Jewish communities in southern Germany:
the Palatinate, Baden, Wuerttemberg, Bavaria.
Check back for new stuff--there's always more.

http://maps.google.com/ -- we all use the GoogleMap-based community maps
attached to the Town Finder pages, but the main site does much more,
such as calculating distances between places. Just how close were Oma's
and Opa's home towns to one another?

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp
is here for completeness' sake. Sometimes tricky, sometimes inaccurate, but
we do still need to consult those films or at least know that they're out there.

And, because I can't pass up the chance to mention it again,
http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/
-- the Family Finder. Why in heaven's name would anyone want to do research
when they could be corresponding with the people--perhaps their own
cousins--who have already been doing it?
This is Jewish genealogy's single most powerful tool.

---------------------------------------

Now, some more recent stuff.

http://www.lbi.org/ is working on putting its collections on-line.
_All_ of them, to the extent possible. In downloadable form. Berthold
Rosenthal's thousands of pages of transcriptions of documents of Baden's
Jewry. (That one's been good for me, to the tune of at least 700
relatives!) The Rudolf Simonis collection. John Henry Richter's
collection. Charles Stanton's. Hundreds of family collections, some of
them truly remarkable. Come to think of it: why not donate a copy of
_your_ working papers to LBI? They won't put them on line if you don't
want that. Besides, their storage facilities are more fire- and
waterproof than your spare bedroom is, I'll bet.

http://agora.sub.uni-hamburg.de/subhh-adress/digbib/start
is much like http://adressbuch.zlb.de/, only for Hamburg instead of Berlin
(see above). Goes up to 1919, plus the 1926 phone book. Germany's
4th-largest Jewish community, back in the day.

http://www.ancestry.com/ costs money, but if some of your folks lived in
Germany in the 1930s, or served in the Bavarian Army in WW I, you should
definitely take their introductory offer and find out how good your
self-discipline is when the trial period ends. (For those of you lucky
enough to have a nearby public library or similar institution that
subscribes to the web site, so much the better!) The Bavarian army's
muster books contain enormously rich information about each soldier,
often repeated in 5 or 6 different books, and the lists of German Jews
who had their citizenship revoked are also noteworthy.

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632
is the first instance of what I hope will be a general trend: German
archives putting the original vital records on line. They're behind the
curve, mind you: http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html is Latvia's amazing
home of all vital records (Jewish and Gentile) over 100 years old.
Almost 2 terabytes, almost 6 million images. But Baden-Wuerttemberg has
taken an important first step by giving us images >from the so-called
Gatermann films, the originals of which no longer exist. These are
vital records and family registers >from hundreds of towns, generally
from the period 1808--1875. Many of the images are hard to read even if
you're Gerhard Buck (who gave a fine introduction to German script at
the conference); but in many cases they're all we have.

Logan Kleinwaks has given us http://genealogyindexer.org/, an index of
street directories and the like. Mostly central and eastern Europe.
All of it full of unexpected finds.

---------------------------------------

Finally, our SIG's very own projects are bearing fruit.

_Der Aufbau_ was New York's German-language Jewish weekly newspaper >from
1934 until 2002. In this case, New York's outer boroughs extended to
Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires and Los Angeles. Marriage, anniversary and
death announcements included both current and former (i.e., German)
towns. An "Eingetroffen" column in each week's paper reported on moves
to New York, and there were several "searching for" lists, some provided
by Jewish rescue agencies.

Working with Harry Katzman, Alex Calzareth has led the effort to index
these many entries, some of which are truly moving to read even for
readers who have no connections to the families and persons mentioned.
http://calzareth.com/aufbau/ will take you to the Heights and all the
other neighborhoods where our folks settled in the Western hemisphere.
At this moment, all entries >from the 1940s have been indexed, and there
are plenty >from other times as well.

Finally, the Name Adoption List inDEX (NALDEX) is ripe for the searching
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Germany/Naldex.htm. Here you can
find the names of over 16,000 heads of household, almost all >from
Prussia, who, in the course of emancipation, became citizens with most
if not all the rights of their Gentile neighbors in the period
1790-1860. Currently the only non-Prussian area covered by Phase 1 of
the project is Lippe-Detmold, which reported 256 households. Some of
the lists provide little more than place-name and old and new names of
the head of household; others list spouses, children, the head of
household's occupation and more.

The response to NALDEX has been wonderful. At some point, everyone who
has commented on it has used the word "more." There certainly is
more--not least a published Prussian list >from 1846 that nobody knew
about until Logan Kleinwaks stumbled upon it a few days ago. It will
become part of NALDEX soon; meanwhile we'll be looking to see whether
there are more like it hiding in similar plain sight. We'll be
reporting the project status regularly, I hope.

------------------------------------------

Thanks to all who made this conference unforgettable. Also, thanks to
the GerSIGgers who showed up, pitched in, hosted, helped out and
otherwise made everyone feel at home--even those of us who _were_ at home.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG


Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of Lwow #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

I have been queried by Dorit Morag, who has a Facebook group,
"Irgun Yotsei Lwow V' hasviva" (Organization of Lwow Origin Jews),
on her great grandfather, Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of
Lwow. I found one reference to him as author of an introduction
to "Sefer Maaseh Gevurot Hashem", Lwow, 1916, by Saul Mander. If
anyone has information leads, please let me know and I will
forward it to her.

Thank you,

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@...
http://karmisheli.blogspot.com

Researching Family Records of
WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine, Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany)
ZARWANITZER (Dolyna/Ukraine)
IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)
GOTTDENKER (Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine)


German SIG #Germany New On-Line Resources for German-Jewish Family Research #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear GerSIG friends:

What an exhilarating week it's been! The IAJGS conference in my home
town of Vashinkten, DeSea (as a legendary entry to the FamilyFinder once
had it) brought insight, reunions, new friendships, opportunities for
projects and many more joys in a stream that seemed unending.

All five of GerSIG's directors (we used to be coordinators) were there,
and so were more than 100 enthusiastic members of our group. Hans Hirsch
celebrated his 95th birthday, Allan Hirsh his 91st; Alex Calzareth
announced a milestone in the Aufbau Indexing Project and I got to rattle
on about GerSIG's first ongoing database project, the Name Adoption List
inDEX, aka NALDEX.

Some of that rattling came during my presentation about new and
not-so-new Web resources. In exchange for neither showing nor reading
aloud the URLs of the sites I displayed, I promised to post those URLs
as soon as possible. Here we go, in no particular order:

First of all, there are the many not-so-new sites that some of us
haven't used yet.

http://wikipedia.org
is something I consult every day. Along with its
many other uses, it's very handy for finding the modern names of towns
no longer in Germany. Here's one way: >from the global start page (the
URL given here), put in a town name and select Deutsch as your language
of choice. This should take you to a wikipedia.de page with the town's
modern name as its title. If you don't speak enough German yet, go to
the sidebar and click on the "English" link that's almost certainly
there--and you've found your English-language page for the town.
Perhaps a little roundabout, but the German 'pedia is the best at
redirecting >from older names to new.

http://www.verwaltungsgeschichte.de/
is Michael Rademacher's German historical gazetteer.
Nothing fancy here, not even a search function--just the administrative
structure of the entire Reich as it was before and after WW I, plus many
other useful features.

There's a page for every Kreis (county); that page contains the name
of every city, town and village in the Kreis, with population figures >from
various times (often broken down by religion), descriptions of the
larger cities, links to provincial government, courts, military and
religious units, etc. Click on "Ortsbuch" and away you go. Ancient web
technology, timeless info.

http://gov.genealogy.net/
is part of a German-language wiki devoted to genealogy. It does much
of the same work as Rademacher's site, but with search functions and
some nice graphical representations of how the governmental
hierarchies worked over time.

Among actual databases of names are:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en
-- the German memorial book -- is unique. Most of the information
is also available via http://www.yadvashem.org/, but this site is
updated frequently, and those in charge are willing to accept corrections
and fix entries.

http://adressbuch.zlb.de/ -- the Berlin address books.
Click on "Suche [etc.]" to search, pick a time period, then a year,
then section I. for that year, then a letter of the alphabet.
from there, it's like using, well, an address or phone directory.
Date range is 1799-1943.

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en
is the Polish State Archives vital records sources database.
English-language search page, menu boxes and results in Polish;
but the help pages (links in the sidebar) explain the key terms, including
the Polish word for "Jewish." Well, at least the one that the PSA uses.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/
has fascinating pages about many Jewish communities in southern Germany:
the Palatinate, Baden, Wuerttemberg, Bavaria.
Check back for new stuff--there's always more.

http://maps.google.com/ -- we all use the GoogleMap-based community maps
attached to the Town Finder pages, but the main site does much more,
such as calculating distances between places. Just how close were Oma's
and Opa's home towns to one another?

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp
is here for completeness' sake. Sometimes tricky, sometimes inaccurate, but
we do still need to consult those films or at least know that they're out there.

And, because I can't pass up the chance to mention it again,
http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/
-- the Family Finder. Why in heaven's name would anyone want to do research
when they could be corresponding with the people--perhaps their own
cousins--who have already been doing it?
This is Jewish genealogy's single most powerful tool.

---------------------------------------

Now, some more recent stuff.

http://www.lbi.org/ is working on putting its collections on-line.
_All_ of them, to the extent possible. In downloadable form. Berthold
Rosenthal's thousands of pages of transcriptions of documents of Baden's
Jewry. (That one's been good for me, to the tune of at least 700
relatives!) The Rudolf Simonis collection. John Henry Richter's
collection. Charles Stanton's. Hundreds of family collections, some of
them truly remarkable. Come to think of it: why not donate a copy of
_your_ working papers to LBI? They won't put them on line if you don't
want that. Besides, their storage facilities are more fire- and
waterproof than your spare bedroom is, I'll bet.

http://agora.sub.uni-hamburg.de/subhh-adress/digbib/start
is much like http://adressbuch.zlb.de/, only for Hamburg instead of Berlin
(see above). Goes up to 1919, plus the 1926 phone book. Germany's
4th-largest Jewish community, back in the day.

http://www.ancestry.com/ costs money, but if some of your folks lived in
Germany in the 1930s, or served in the Bavarian Army in WW I, you should
definitely take their introductory offer and find out how good your
self-discipline is when the trial period ends. (For those of you lucky
enough to have a nearby public library or similar institution that
subscribes to the web site, so much the better!) The Bavarian army's
muster books contain enormously rich information about each soldier,
often repeated in 5 or 6 different books, and the lists of German Jews
who had their citizenship revoked are also noteworthy.

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632
is the first instance of what I hope will be a general trend: German
archives putting the original vital records on line. They're behind the
curve, mind you: http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html is Latvia's amazing
home of all vital records (Jewish and Gentile) over 100 years old.
Almost 2 terabytes, almost 6 million images. But Baden-Wuerttemberg has
taken an important first step by giving us images >from the so-called
Gatermann films, the originals of which no longer exist. These are
vital records and family registers >from hundreds of towns, generally
from the period 1808--1875. Many of the images are hard to read even if
you're Gerhard Buck (who gave a fine introduction to German script at
the conference); but in many cases they're all we have.

Logan Kleinwaks has given us http://genealogyindexer.org/, an index of
street directories and the like. Mostly central and eastern Europe.
All of it full of unexpected finds.

---------------------------------------

Finally, our SIG's very own projects are bearing fruit.

_Der Aufbau_ was New York's German-language Jewish weekly newspaper >from
1934 until 2002. In this case, New York's outer boroughs extended to
Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires and Los Angeles. Marriage, anniversary and
death announcements included both current and former (i.e., German)
towns. An "Eingetroffen" column in each week's paper reported on moves
to New York, and there were several "searching for" lists, some provided
by Jewish rescue agencies.

Working with Harry Katzman, Alex Calzareth has led the effort to index
these many entries, some of which are truly moving to read even for
readers who have no connections to the families and persons mentioned.
http://calzareth.com/aufbau/ will take you to the Heights and all the
other neighborhoods where our folks settled in the Western hemisphere.
At this moment, all entries >from the 1940s have been indexed, and there
are plenty >from other times as well.

Finally, the Name Adoption List inDEX (NALDEX) is ripe for the searching
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Germany/Naldex.htm. Here you can
find the names of over 16,000 heads of household, almost all >from
Prussia, who, in the course of emancipation, became citizens with most
if not all the rights of their Gentile neighbors in the period
1790-1860. Currently the only non-Prussian area covered by Phase 1 of
the project is Lippe-Detmold, which reported 256 households. Some of
the lists provide little more than place-name and old and new names of
the head of household; others list spouses, children, the head of
household's occupation and more.

The response to NALDEX has been wonderful. At some point, everyone who
has commented on it has used the word "more." There certainly is
more--not least a published Prussian list >from 1846 that nobody knew
about until Logan Kleinwaks stumbled upon it a few days ago. It will
become part of NALDEX soon; meanwhile we'll be looking to see whether
there are more like it hiding in similar plain sight. We'll be
reporting the project status regularly, I hope.

------------------------------------------

Thanks to all who made this conference unforgettable. Also, thanks to
the GerSIGgers who showed up, pitched in, hosted, helped out and
otherwise made everyone feel at home--even those of us who _were_ at home.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of Lwow #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

I have been queried by Dorit Morag, who has a Facebook group,
"Irgun Yotsei Lwow V' hasviva" (Organization of Lwow Origin Jews),
on her great grandfather, Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of
Lwow. I found one reference to him as author of an introduction
to "Sefer Maaseh Gevurot Hashem", Lwow, 1916, by Saul Mander. If
anyone has information leads, please let me know and I will
forward it to her.

Thank you,

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@...
http://karmisheli.blogspot.com

Researching Family Records of
WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine, Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany)
ZARWANITZER (Dolyna/Ukraine)
IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)
GOTTDENKER (Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine)


names #poland

Shirley Portnoy <sportnoy48@...>
 

I apologize for the length of this inquiry, but all the items stem >from the
same family.

1. Does anyone know what kind of name Eige is? Does it derive >from another
Hebrew/Yiddish name?

2. My great-grandfather's marriage record on JRI-Poland lists him as Mordko
from Zwanitz, and the last name as Pidnaczyk v Amcies. Am I correct in
assuming that Pidnaczyk was his mother's maiden name? What does the "v"
mean?

When I did a search for Pidnaczyk in the surrounding towns, I didn't come
across the same name at all. There were all kinds of approximations and
also the substitution of "b" for "p". Where might this name originate? How
would I be able to track it?

3. When a husband and wife are both listed with the same last name on the
JRI-Poland records, how is it possible to tell whether the last name belongs
to the husband or the wife's family?

I know that sometimes children were listed in the official records under
their mother's maiden name. This was the case with my grandmother, Czarne,
the daughter of Szulim Szapiera and Riwke Reisie Sonenklar. For years I
couldn't find my family until I remembered the Sonenklar name, and then I
found the children listed as Sonenklar, not Szapiera.

In the Sonenklar family there is a couple, probably born in the late 1700's,
named Feibisz Dawid Sonenklar and Czarne Sonenklar. I suspect that these may
be the grandparents of the above Czarne Sonenklar, my grandmother, whose
father's last name was Szapiera. How can I determine whether Feibisz Dawid
or the elder Czarne were >from the Sonenklar family?

4. There is another listing >from the same period of a Feibisz Dawid
Sonenklar married to Babe Sonenklar. Is it possible that Babe and Czarne
are the same person? Was Babe used for women as Alter was used for men?

I'd appreciate any help on these matters.
Thank you.

Shirley Amcis Portnoy (sportnoy48@...)
Little Neck, NY

Researching : AMCIS, AMCIS, AMTZIS (and any other phonetic variations),
SONENKLAR, and SZAPIERA >from OKOPY, BORSZCZOW, CZORTKOW, ULASKOWCE,
MIELNICA, and BURDIKOWCE; REINSTEIN >from MIELNICA; PIDNACZYK >from ?

also HARKAVY, GARKAVY, GARKAWE, etc., >from GRODNO, VOLKOVISK, SKIDEL;
GABOVITCH >from SKIDEL;YEZERSKI >from VOLKOVISK; and ZERSHTEIN and RIFKIND
from GRODNO


JRI Poland #Poland names #poland

Shirley Portnoy <sportnoy48@...>
 

I apologize for the length of this inquiry, but all the items stem >from the
same family.

1. Does anyone know what kind of name Eige is? Does it derive >from another
Hebrew/Yiddish name?

2. My great-grandfather's marriage record on JRI-Poland lists him as Mordko
from Zwanitz, and the last name as Pidnaczyk v Amcies. Am I correct in
assuming that Pidnaczyk was his mother's maiden name? What does the "v"
mean?

When I did a search for Pidnaczyk in the surrounding towns, I didn't come
across the same name at all. There were all kinds of approximations and
also the substitution of "b" for "p". Where might this name originate? How
would I be able to track it?

3. When a husband and wife are both listed with the same last name on the
JRI-Poland records, how is it possible to tell whether the last name belongs
to the husband or the wife's family?

I know that sometimes children were listed in the official records under
their mother's maiden name. This was the case with my grandmother, Czarne,
the daughter of Szulim Szapiera and Riwke Reisie Sonenklar. For years I
couldn't find my family until I remembered the Sonenklar name, and then I
found the children listed as Sonenklar, not Szapiera.

In the Sonenklar family there is a couple, probably born in the late 1700's,
named Feibisz Dawid Sonenklar and Czarne Sonenklar. I suspect that these may
be the grandparents of the above Czarne Sonenklar, my grandmother, whose
father's last name was Szapiera. How can I determine whether Feibisz Dawid
or the elder Czarne were >from the Sonenklar family?

4. There is another listing >from the same period of a Feibisz Dawid
Sonenklar married to Babe Sonenklar. Is it possible that Babe and Czarne
are the same person? Was Babe used for women as Alter was used for men?

I'd appreciate any help on these matters.
Thank you.

Shirley Amcis Portnoy (sportnoy48@...)
Little Neck, NY

Researching : AMCIS, AMCIS, AMTZIS (and any other phonetic variations),
SONENKLAR, and SZAPIERA >from OKOPY, BORSZCZOW, CZORTKOW, ULASKOWCE,
MIELNICA, and BURDIKOWCE; REINSTEIN >from MIELNICA; PIDNACZYK >from ?

also HARKAVY, GARKAVY, GARKAWE, etc., >from GRODNO, VOLKOVISK, SKIDEL;
GABOVITCH >from SKIDEL;YEZERSKI >from VOLKOVISK; and ZERSHTEIN and RIFKIND
from GRODNO


2011 Stern Grant Announcement #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The 2011 Stern Grant Awardees were announced at the IAJGS Conference in
Washington, DC. This year there were two very worthy Stern Grant Awardees.

Gesher Galicia was awarded a Stern Grant towards the continuing efforts
to inventory, index and record acquisition for the Cadastral Map and
Landowner Records Project. This project will benefit a wide range of
genealogists.
More information on this project can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/CadastralMapProject.html

The American Jewish Historical Society (http://www.ajhs.org)was awarded
a Stern Grant towards the Archive's continuing efforts to microfilm the
Records of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (Boston), 1870-1977. The
original files are in Boston and by microfilming them it would give
greater access to these records both in their Boston and New York facilities.
A partial finding aid is searchable on-line at http://www.cjh.org/p/61).
This project is not only beneficial to genealogists but by providing funds to
the AJHS we build better relationships between Archives and Genealogist.

Stern Grant Committee

Hadassah Lipsius
Leah Gedalia
Heidi Urich


IJGM Poster Contest Winner #general

Nancy Adelson <nancyadelson@...>
 

Mazel Tov to Jillian Beroza for winning the International Jewish Genealogy
Month Poster Contest which was announced at the IAJGS Presidents Meeting and
during the Washington DC IAJGS Conference Gala. She joined the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Long Island (JGSLI) in 2010 and serves as a Member at
Large; primarily creating design pieces and aiding in the branding of
JGSLI's identity. Jillian's interest in genealogy started at the age of 9.

International Jewish Genealogy Month honors our Jewish ancestors through the
pursuit of Jewish family history research. It's our hope that our member
organizations will take advantage of the International Jewish Genealogy
Month to encourage Jewish genealogy and publicize their organization and
activities all over the world.

The International Jewish Genealogy month is celebrated on the Hebrew month
of Cheshvan. The 2011 exact dates are >from Oct 29 to Nov 26.

Everyone who attended this wonderful conference received copies of the
poster in their conference memory sticks to make it easier to use and print.
The poster, artist comments about the poster, Jillian's picture and
biography will be uploaded to International Jewish Genealogy site at
http://www.iajgs.org/jgmonth.html.

Thank you to the exceptional IJGM committee members >from Israel, United
Kingdom and USA: Carol Shkolnik, Diane Wainwood, Garri Regev, Rabbi Garry
Gans, Howard Morris, Janice Sellers, Jeanette Rosenberg and Joanne Tanney
Clements and the strong support of the IAJGS Board Members. Thank you to the
leaders and volunteers of the Washington DC IAJGS conference.

Nancy Adelson
International Jewish Genealogy Month Chair
nancyadelson@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IJGM Poster Contest Winner #general

Nancy Adelson <nancyadelson@...>
 

Mazel Tov to Jillian Beroza for winning the International Jewish Genealogy
Month Poster Contest which was announced at the IAJGS Presidents Meeting and
during the Washington DC IAJGS Conference Gala. She joined the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Long Island (JGSLI) in 2010 and serves as a Member at
Large; primarily creating design pieces and aiding in the branding of
JGSLI's identity. Jillian's interest in genealogy started at the age of 9.

International Jewish Genealogy Month honors our Jewish ancestors through the
pursuit of Jewish family history research. It's our hope that our member
organizations will take advantage of the International Jewish Genealogy
Month to encourage Jewish genealogy and publicize their organization and
activities all over the world.

The International Jewish Genealogy month is celebrated on the Hebrew month
of Cheshvan. The 2011 exact dates are >from Oct 29 to Nov 26.

Everyone who attended this wonderful conference received copies of the
poster in their conference memory sticks to make it easier to use and print.
The poster, artist comments about the poster, Jillian's picture and
biography will be uploaded to International Jewish Genealogy site at
http://www.iajgs.org/jgmonth.html.

Thank you to the exceptional IJGM committee members >from Israel, United
Kingdom and USA: Carol Shkolnik, Diane Wainwood, Garri Regev, Rabbi Garry
Gans, Howard Morris, Janice Sellers, Jeanette Rosenberg and Joanne Tanney
Clements and the strong support of the IAJGS Board Members. Thank you to the
leaders and volunteers of the Washington DC IAJGS conference.

Nancy Adelson
International Jewish Genealogy Month Chair
nancyadelson@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 2011 Stern Grant Announcement #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The 2011 Stern Grant Awardees were announced at the IAJGS Conference in
Washington, DC. This year there were two very worthy Stern Grant Awardees.

Gesher Galicia was awarded a Stern Grant towards the continuing efforts
to inventory, index and record acquisition for the Cadastral Map and
Landowner Records Project. This project will benefit a wide range of
genealogists.
More information on this project can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/CadastralMapProject.html

The American Jewish Historical Society (http://www.ajhs.org)was awarded
a Stern Grant towards the Archive's continuing efforts to microfilm the
Records of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (Boston), 1870-1977. The
original files are in Boston and by microfilming them it would give
greater access to these records both in their Boston and New York facilities.
A partial finding aid is searchable on-line at http://www.cjh.org/p/61).
This project is not only beneficial to genealogists but by providing funds to
the AJHS we build better relationships between Archives and Genealogist.

Stern Grant Committee

Hadassah Lipsius
Leah Gedalia
Heidi Urich


Where is Chenof Russia/Poland #poland

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

David / Davis Calman came >from "Russia/Poland" to New York about 1883
(haven't found a ships record) and married in NY in 1886.
He was naturalized in 1891.

The clues I have to where he came >from are:
He religious marriage ceremony performed by Michel Schapiro, Reverand,
44 E Bway, Synagogue which at the time was B'nai Emeth Maryompole
(Marijampole, Lithuania).
In 1930 his married daughter said he was born in (phonetically) Chenof,
Russia.

I have posted the original documents at http://tinyurl.com/3uxlzab
if you want to take a look.

Bobby Furst
bobby1st@...


JRI Poland #Poland Where is Chenof Russia/Poland #poland

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

David / Davis Calman came >from "Russia/Poland" to New York about 1883
(haven't found a ships record) and married in NY in 1886.
He was naturalized in 1891.

The clues I have to where he came >from are:
He religious marriage ceremony performed by Michel Schapiro, Reverand,
44 E Bway, Synagogue which at the time was B'nai Emeth Maryompole
(Marijampole, Lithuania).
In 1930 his married daughter said he was born in (phonetically) Chenof,
Russia.

I have posted the original documents at http://tinyurl.com/3uxlzab
if you want to take a look.

Bobby Furst
bobby1st@...


ViewMate loose translation request - Polish; WAGNER(man) in Lublin province #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Hello fellow researchers,

I've posted 2 vital records in Polish for which I need some help and
at least a loose translation.
All of the documents concern, as far as I can tell, WAGNERs and
related in the Lublin area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses, occupations, ages, where they came from, if they were still
alive at the time, other relatives etc.
Also if it says WAGNER or WAGNERMAN on the documents.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Birth of WAGNER(MAN)? Chana >from Krasnik
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19889

Birth of WAGNER(MAN)? Izrael Jakob >from Krasnik
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19890

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate
application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate loose translation request - Polish; WAGNER(man) in Lublin province #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Hello fellow researchers,

I've posted 2 vital records in Polish for which I need some help and
at least a loose translation.
All of the documents concern, as far as I can tell, WAGNERs and
related in the Lublin area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses, occupations, ages, where they came from, if they were still
alive at the time, other relatives etc.
Also if it says WAGNER or WAGNERMAN on the documents.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Birth of WAGNER(MAN)? Chana >from Krasnik
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19889

Birth of WAGNER(MAN)? Izrael Jakob >from Krasnik
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19890

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate
application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL


Can someone help me identify? #lithuania

Josh Grise <jmgrise@...>
 

Hi. I am is Josh Grise of Lexington, Kentucky.

My great grandfather was Mosche Blumenthal (1895 -1975).
He was born in a shtetl outside Kaunas, Lithuania to a poor couple,
along with 4 siblings. His father was Velvel Blumenthal; a grain
merchant. Velvel died young, leaving his wife, Sarah nee Rogal with
5 children - Mosche, Louis (American name), Itzhak, Khana, and Rose.
Sarah abandoned the children, and left them to fend for themselves
while she ran off and remarried.

All of the children ended up in America except for Itzhak. Itzhak
married Khana Berger and perished during the Holocaust.
Khana became Anna Bogoratt and Rose became Rose Rogal.
A relative of mine recently passed away and had these Blumenthal
photos on his wall. However, no one knows who they are.
Below is a link.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19888

The photo looks very old both by the physical wear as well as
the peoples' clothing. Does anyone know who they are? My best guess
is that they are Vevel and Sarah Blumenthal with their family.

If anyone can help at all, then it would be wonderful.
Thanks
Josh Grise

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19888


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Can someone help me identify? #lithuania

Josh Grise <jmgrise@...>
 

Hi. I am is Josh Grise of Lexington, Kentucky.

My great grandfather was Mosche Blumenthal (1895 -1975).
He was born in a shtetl outside Kaunas, Lithuania to a poor couple,
along with 4 siblings. His father was Velvel Blumenthal; a grain
merchant. Velvel died young, leaving his wife, Sarah nee Rogal with
5 children - Mosche, Louis (American name), Itzhak, Khana, and Rose.
Sarah abandoned the children, and left them to fend for themselves
while she ran off and remarried.

All of the children ended up in America except for Itzhak. Itzhak
married Khana Berger and perished during the Holocaust.
Khana became Anna Bogoratt and Rose became Rose Rogal.
A relative of mine recently passed away and had these Blumenthal
photos on his wall. However, no one knows who they are.
Below is a link.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19888

The photo looks very old both by the physical wear as well as
the peoples' clothing. Does anyone know who they are? My best guess
is that they are Vevel and Sarah Blumenthal with their family.

If anyone can help at all, then it would be wonderful.
Thanks
Josh Grise

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19888


Re: NYC area cemeteries #germany

Renee Steinig
 

Many German Jews who immigrated to the US during the Nazi era and
settled in New York City -- especially Washington Heights -- are
buried at Cedar Park and Beth El Cemeteries in Bergen County, New
Jersey (http://www.cedarparkbethelcemeteries.com). But I see >from the
1910 and 1920 US censuses that Johanna and her husband Max (indexed as
"PLANT") immigrated much earlier. In 1910 they lived in Manhattan and
in 1920, in the Bronx. Perhaps they bought NYC burial plots before
moving west.

Some suggestions:

- Try the NY area Jewish cemeteries that are available online. See
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-scdb.htm

- Search for a NYC death record. (When my cousin, who is buried in
Queens, died in Providence, Rhode Island, in the 1960s, an additional
record was filed in NYC.)

- Search for Johanna's sisters' and husband's death records.

- Contact the Kansas City funeral home that handled arrangements. Some
funeral homes archive their records for decades.

Good luck! Renee

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@...

Ethan Starr <edstarr@...> wrote, in part:
"I am trying to locate the cemetery that a distant relative was
buried in ... The relative, Johanna PLAUT, died January 11, 1958, in
Kansas City, Missouri. Her death certificate does not list the
cemetery, only stating "removal" as to the disposition of the body.
The obit in the Kansas City Star states that burial will be in "New
York."
Thus, my question is, are there certain cemeteries in the greater NYC
area (including New Jersey), that are known as primarily German Jewish
cemeteries? I'm not clear as to why she chose to be buried in New
York - she was survived by a sister there, and another sister may have
lived there, but if her parents came over to the US, I am not aware of it."


German SIG #Germany Re: NYC area cemeteries #germany

Renee Steinig
 

Many German Jews who immigrated to the US during the Nazi era and
settled in New York City -- especially Washington Heights -- are
buried at Cedar Park and Beth El Cemeteries in Bergen County, New
Jersey (http://www.cedarparkbethelcemeteries.com). But I see >from the
1910 and 1920 US censuses that Johanna and her husband Max (indexed as
"PLANT") immigrated much earlier. In 1910 they lived in Manhattan and
in 1920, in the Bronx. Perhaps they bought NYC burial plots before
moving west.

Some suggestions:

- Try the NY area Jewish cemeteries that are available online. See
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-scdb.htm

- Search for a NYC death record. (When my cousin, who is buried in
Queens, died in Providence, Rhode Island, in the 1960s, an additional
record was filed in NYC.)

- Search for Johanna's sisters' and husband's death records.

- Contact the Kansas City funeral home that handled arrangements. Some
funeral homes archive their records for decades.

Good luck! Renee

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@...

Ethan Starr <edstarr@...> wrote, in part:
"I am trying to locate the cemetery that a distant relative was
buried in ... The relative, Johanna PLAUT, died January 11, 1958, in
Kansas City, Missouri. Her death certificate does not list the
cemetery, only stating "removal" as to the disposition of the body.
The obit in the Kansas City Star states that burial will be in "New
York."
Thus, my question is, are there certain cemeteries in the greater NYC
area (including New Jersey), that are known as primarily German Jewish
cemeteries? I'm not clear as to why she chose to be buried in New
York - she was survived by a sister there, and another sister may have
lived there, but if her parents came over to the US, I am not aware of it."


Where is Chenof, Russia/Poland? #general

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

David / Davis Calman came >from "Russia/Poland" to New York about 1883
(haven't found a ships record) and married in NY in 1886.
He was naturalized in 1891.

The clues I have to where he came >from are:
The religious marriage ceremony performed by Michel Schapiro, Reverand,
44 E Bway, Synagogue which at the time was B'nai Emeth Maryompole
(Marijampole, Lithuania).
In 1930 his married daughter said he was born in (phonetically) Chenof,
Russia.

I have posted the original documents at http://tinyurl.com/3uxlzab
if you want to take a look.

Bobby Furst
bobby1st@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Where is Chenof, Russia/Poland? #general

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

David / Davis Calman came >from "Russia/Poland" to New York about 1883
(haven't found a ships record) and married in NY in 1886.
He was naturalized in 1891.

The clues I have to where he came >from are:
The religious marriage ceremony performed by Michel Schapiro, Reverand,
44 E Bway, Synagogue which at the time was B'nai Emeth Maryompole
(Marijampole, Lithuania).
In 1930 his married daughter said he was born in (phonetically) Chenof,
Russia.

I have posted the original documents at http://tinyurl.com/3uxlzab
if you want to take a look.

Bobby Furst
bobby1st@...

193181 - 193200 of 675067