Date   

Re: Strange Names: Fuel-Rafael-Falka, etc. #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Chaim Freedman asked "So was Rafael necessarily the origin of Falk?"

I came at the name Rafael, and its variants, >from a slightly different
angle. In researching my DAWIDOWICZ ancestors (who came >from the Wielun
/Dzialoszyn area of central Poland), I discovered a string of family names
which sounded and looked distinctly Polish. One of these names was the
family name of my ancestor Estera WOLKOWICZOWNA (1776-1830). After a little
research I identified that the 'Wolk' of which Estera was the maiden
daughter was derived >from the Polonization of the name Rafael.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Strange Names: Fuel-Rafael-Falka, etc. #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Chaim Freedman asked "So was Rafael necessarily the origin of Falk?"

I came at the name Rafael, and its variants, >from a slightly different
angle. In researching my DAWIDOWICZ ancestors (who came >from the Wielun
/Dzialoszyn area of central Poland), I discovered a string of family names
which sounded and looked distinctly Polish. One of these names was the
family name of my ancestor Estera WOLKOWICZOWNA (1776-1830). After a little
research I identified that the 'Wolk' of which Estera was the maiden
daughter was derived >from the Polonization of the name Rafael.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Viewmate translation of Russian Birth Cert. Please #general

Mark Michaels
 

I would be most grateful for a translation of this birth certificate
which I believe to be >from Mlawa in Poland written in Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16091

Very many thanks

Mark J Michaels
Montgomery Wales


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation of Russian Birth Cert. Please #general

Mark Michaels
 

I would be most grateful for a translation of this birth certificate
which I believe to be >from Mlawa in Poland written in Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16091

Very many thanks

Mark J Michaels
Montgomery Wales


Subject: A strange but possibly useful site #hungary

jbisenberg@...
 

If you look at the site (http://www.geni.sk/) with Google Translate turned on, it does a very respectable job of translation. The site was created by a private researcher, Marek Tettinger. He created the web site to share the resources and topics of interest he found while researching his tree. The Site Map includes links to many useful articles and resources.

Janet Isenberg
Glen Rock, NJ

Subject: A strange but possibly useful site
From: tom.vene@bol.com.br
Date: Thu, 22 Jul 2010 19:25:13 -0300
X-Message-Number: 3

Friends,
I just stumbled into a quite strange site. It is in Slovak and I cannot make
out exactly what is its purpose. The site's title is "Rodokmen" which means
"Family tree." Page <http://www.geni.sk/mapa-stranok/> seems to me a golden
trove. If you click on any link seemingly you will discover what each of the
Slovak regional or district archives contain. Could somebody more fluent in
Slovak tell us how to use this site?
Regards
Tom Venetianer


Hungary SIG #Hungary Subject: A strange but possibly useful site #hungary

jbisenberg@...
 

If you look at the site (http://www.geni.sk/) with Google Translate turned on, it does a very respectable job of translation. The site was created by a private researcher, Marek Tettinger. He created the web site to share the resources and topics of interest he found while researching his tree. The Site Map includes links to many useful articles and resources.

Janet Isenberg
Glen Rock, NJ

Subject: A strange but possibly useful site
From: tom.vene@bol.com.br
Date: Thu, 22 Jul 2010 19:25:13 -0300
X-Message-Number: 3

Friends,
I just stumbled into a quite strange site. It is in Slovak and I cannot make
out exactly what is its purpose. The site's title is "Rodokmen" which means
"Family tree." Page <http://www.geni.sk/mapa-stranok/> seems to me a golden
trove. If you click on any link seemingly you will discover what each of the
Slovak regional or district archives contain. Could somebody more fluent in
Slovak tell us how to use this site?
Regards
Tom Venetianer


Re: dual patronymics #belarus

joyweave
 

Does anyone know whether there was any traditional double or alternate
name that went with what would be Joshua in English? My
great-grandfather has been found as Yehoshua on my gf's tombstone, Ovsei
in Russian-Polish documents, and Sheya on my gf's American death
certificate. But his name does not appear in the 1850 revision list for
what is now Vysokoye, Belarus. My gf was born in 1859, so my ggf should
have been in the 1850 census unless he lived elsewhere or was hidden.

What I'm wondering is whether he might actually be in the revision list,
but under a second name I do not know is a name commonly linked to his.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: dual patronymics #belarus

joyweave
 

Does anyone know whether there was any traditional double or alternate
name that went with what would be Joshua in English? My
great-grandfather has been found as Yehoshua on my gf's tombstone, Ovsei
in Russian-Polish documents, and Sheya on my gf's American death
certificate. But his name does not appear in the 1850 revision list for
what is now Vysokoye, Belarus. My gf was born in 1859, so my ggf should
have been in the 1850 census unless he lived elsewhere or was hidden.

What I'm wondering is whether he might actually be in the revision list,
but under a second name I do not know is a name commonly linked to his.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


Re: dual patronymics #belarus

Stephen Weinstein
 

No, that means his father (who you call Nahum) was Naumo-Girshon.
Stephen Weinstein
Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,

"Jonathan Adams <pangolin19@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello:I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno
in the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as "Joseph
Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we have seen the
hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather
Was this a common naming convention at the time? Thanks for any insights
Jonathan Adams, Rockville, Md."


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: dual patronymics #belarus

Stephen Weinstein
 

No, that means his father (who you call Nahum) was Naumo-Girshon.
Stephen Weinstein
Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,

"Jonathan Adams <pangolin19@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello:I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno
in the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as "Joseph
Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we have seen the
hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather
Was this a common naming convention at the time? Thanks for any insights
Jonathan Adams, Rockville, Md."


Translation from Polish to English #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Second try. I would appreciate it greatly if someone could
translate, >from Polish to English, the marriage records listed
below. They are >from the city of Lviv.

Use the addresses listed below to go directly to the images.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15661
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15660
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15659
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15658

Thanking you in advance,

Errol Schneegurt
ESLVIV@AOL.COM
LI NY


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Translation from Polish to English #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Second try. I would appreciate it greatly if someone could
translate, >from Polish to English, the marriage records listed
below. They are >from the city of Lviv.

Use the addresses listed below to go directly to the images.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15661
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15660
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15659
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15658

Thanking you in advance,

Errol Schneegurt
ESLVIV@AOL.COM
LI NY


compound patronymics #belarus

Herbert Lazerow
 

Jonathan Adams wrote-

"I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno
in the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as
"Joseph Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we
have seen the hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was
Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather? Was this a common naming convention at
the time?"

It is not possible to be sure >from the Russian version. Absent other
information, I would assume that the father's full name was Naum-Girsh.
But I have metrical records >from Nezhin Ukraine where, during one year, it is
clear >from the Hebrew version that the grandfather was also listed because
the Hebrew version read the equivalent of Joseph ben Naum ben Girsh. If
you do not have a Hebrew language version, I would lean toward the father's
name being Naum-Girsh if it is hyphenated.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus compound patronymics #belarus

Herbert Lazerow
 

Jonathan Adams wrote-

"I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno
in the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as
"Joseph Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we
have seen the hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was
Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather? Was this a common naming convention at
the time?"

It is not possible to be sure >from the Russian version. Absent other
information, I would assume that the father's full name was Naum-Girsh.
But I have metrical records >from Nezhin Ukraine where, during one year, it is
clear >from the Hebrew version that the grandfather was also listed because
the Hebrew version read the equivalent of Joseph ben Naum ben Girsh. If
you do not have a Hebrew language version, I would lean toward the father's
name being Naum-Girsh if it is hyphenated.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego, CA


dual patronymics #belarus

leonidze@...
 

From: Leonid Zeliger <leonidze@gmail.com>
Date: Jul 22, 2010 8:32 AM
Subject: Re: [belarus] dual patronymics

Hello,
Two remarks might make the things a little bit clearer.
1.There're no double names and, as a result, no double patronymics in
Russian language,culture and tradition. 2.On the other hand there
were double name but no patronymics in Jewish-Yiddish tradition.
When Russian bureaucracy made effort to integrate the Jews in
Russian society they needed to construct a sort of combined form of
Russian patronymic made of (double) Jewish name. Since this
phenomenon did not exist in Russian language, and there were no
grammatical rules for it any clerk could invent any form that seemed
proper to him.
One rule is firm : grandfather's name could never be a part of
patronymics, so "Naumovitch-Girshovitsh" indicated to double father's
name Nahum-Hirsh.
Since a double name was and is foreign and exotic for Russian speaker,
the Jews themselves eventually stopped to use them in everyday life
after they entered in large amounts into Russian society, while the
double name stayed be registered in official documents.
I have in my family archive documents >from 1880-s, in which my GF is
called in 3 different ways : Dov-Ber,Ber and Boris, very significant
illustration of the process.

Leonid Zeliger
Jerusalem
Israel

On 7/21/10, Jonathan Adams <pangolin19@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello:

I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno in
the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as "Joseph
Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we have seen the
hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather
Was this a common naming convention at the time? Thanks for any insights.
.

Jonathan Adams
Rockville, Md.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Fwd: dual patronymics #belarus

leonidze@...
 

From: Leonid Zeliger <leonidze@gmail.com>
Date: Jul 22, 2010 8:32 AM
Subject: Re: [belarus] dual patronymics

Hello,
Two remarks might make the things a little bit clearer.
1.There're no double names and, as a result, no double patronymics in
Russian language,culture and tradition. 2.On the other hand there
were double name but no patronymics in Jewish-Yiddish tradition.
When Russian bureaucracy made effort to integrate the Jews in
Russian society they needed to construct a sort of combined form of
Russian patronymic made of (double) Jewish name. Since this
phenomenon did not exist in Russian language, and there were no
grammatical rules for it any clerk could invent any form that seemed
proper to him.
One rule is firm : grandfather's name could never be a part of
patronymics, so "Naumovitch-Girshovitsh" indicated to double father's
name Nahum-Hirsh.
Since a double name was and is foreign and exotic for Russian speaker,
the Jews themselves eventually stopped to use them in everyday life
after they entered in large amounts into Russian society, while the
double name stayed be registered in official documents.
I have in my family archive documents >from 1880-s, in which my GF is
called in 3 different ways : Dov-Ber,Ber and Boris, very significant
illustration of the process.

Leonid Zeliger
Jerusalem
Israel

On 7/21/10, Jonathan Adams <pangolin19@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello:

I have found some of my grandfather's grammar school forms >from Grodno in
the late 1890s. On three different forms his name is listed as "Joseph
Naumovitch-Girshovitch Adunsky." This is the only place we have seen the
hyphenated patronymic. His father was Nahum; so was Girsh (Hirsh) his grandfather
Was this a common naming convention at the time? Thanks for any insights.
.

Jonathan Adams
Rockville, Md.


Re: Kojata #hungary

tlang@...
 

The full name of the village in Hungarian is "Fuzeskajata",
now "Kojatice" in Slovakia.

Tomi Lang, Nove Zamky, Slovakia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Kojata #hungary

tlang@...
 

The full name of the village in Hungarian is "Fuzeskajata",
now "Kojatice" in Slovakia.

Tomi Lang, Nove Zamky, Slovakia


Re: Strzemieszyce: WENGER family #poland

Stephen Weinstein
 

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-530791 says
that the place you mention was "Strzemieszyce Wielkie" and became a
neighborhood of Dabrowa Gornicza in 1976.

The records >from that area do not give the name of the place where the
family actually lived. Some have the name of the place where the records
were kept. Some have no place.

Some of WENGER family records come up if you search on JRI-Poland for
records >from "Bedzin".

More appear if you do not enter any text for the place name and instead
enter only the surname and select "Piotrkow Gubernia" >from the "Geographic
Region" menu.

Stephen Weinstein
stephenweinstein@yahoo.com
Camarillo, CA 93010

----- Original Message ----
From: Ann Linder <annlinder2009@gmail.com>
Subject: [jri-pl] Strzemieszyce: WENGER family

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
When I do a search for family records, in particular for family WENGER
(WEGIER), there are no records that come up in the town of
Strzemieszyce (it was near Sosnowiec).

I checked out Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots website and there are no
records for this town.

Does anyone have info they can share with me about this? I have
WENGER relations who were born and lived in Strzemieszyce.
thanks so much for any help with this query.

Also, does Strzemieszyce not exist anymore??

--
Ann Linder
Florida USA
Researching
In Sosnowiec: WENGER, WEGIER
In Stopnice & Nowe Korczyn: KAMIENIARZ , SZTEREN, FRYDMAN, ZYLBERBERG,
SILBERBERG, ROTENBERG, NOZYC
In UK: KAMINASH, LEVI, LEVY, KINSLER


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Strzemieszyce: WENGER family #poland

Stephen Weinstein
 

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-530791 says
that the place you mention was "Strzemieszyce Wielkie" and became a
neighborhood of Dabrowa Gornicza in 1976.

The records >from that area do not give the name of the place where the
family actually lived. Some have the name of the place where the records
were kept. Some have no place.

Some of WENGER family records come up if you search on JRI-Poland for
records >from "Bedzin".

More appear if you do not enter any text for the place name and instead
enter only the surname and select "Piotrkow Gubernia" >from the "Geographic
Region" menu.

Stephen Weinstein
stephenweinstein@yahoo.com
Camarillo, CA 93010

----- Original Message ----
From: Ann Linder <annlinder2009@gmail.com>
Subject: [jri-pl] Strzemieszyce: WENGER family

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
When I do a search for family records, in particular for family WENGER
(WEGIER), there are no records that come up in the town of
Strzemieszyce (it was near Sosnowiec).

I checked out Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots website and there are no
records for this town.

Does anyone have info they can share with me about this? I have
WENGER relations who were born and lived in Strzemieszyce.
thanks so much for any help with this query.

Also, does Strzemieszyce not exist anymore??

--
Ann Linder
Florida USA
Researching
In Sosnowiec: WENGER, WEGIER
In Stopnice & Nowe Korczyn: KAMIENIARZ , SZTEREN, FRYDMAN, ZYLBERBERG,
SILBERBERG, ROTENBERG, NOZYC
In UK: KAMINASH, LEVI, LEVY, KINSLER