Date   

Viewmate Translation #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Stephen Brown
 

Dear Fellow Members

I would like to thank those colleagues, especially Robert, Ulrich,
Rodney and Suzie who responded so quickly to my request for a
translation of the certificate of the marriage of my
great-grandparents Abraham Laiban Brickman and Amalie Becker which
took place in Danzig in 1876.

I now have a full translation and a number of new leads to pursue.

I have used Viewmate successfully on a number of occasions and my
research has gained great benefit >from it.

If any member has any information regarding the BRICKMAN or BECKER
from Danzig or the BROWN family >from Gollantsch (now Golancz in
Poland), I would be delighted to hear >from them privately.

Kind regards

Stephen Brown
Manchester UK
smbrown65@...


R' Yisrael (of Ostrog)ben Yosef 19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

I am researching a Yisrael of Ostrog son of Yosef of Breznitz who
lived during the first half of the 19th cent.

We know the following about this Rabbi (?).

He was a follower of the "Ohev Yisrael" of Apta (Heschel). His son
Yosef (possibly Chaim Yosef) married Miriam the sister of R' Shlomo
Chaim of Lechowitz and daughter of R' Aharon and Perl of Karlin
-Stolin. His father, Yosef of Breznitz was a son-in-law of R' Arieh
Leib, the Rav of kremenetzand son of R' Shmuel , also Rav of
Kremenetz. Through these father and son Rabbis he was a descendant of
R' Naftali KATZ , author of the "Smichat Chachamim", and who was a
ggrandson of the MaHaRa"L . Yisrael was also a descendant of the
MaHaRsha"L.

Various published genealogical sources record the above down to R'
Arieh Leib of Kremenetz but >from then only record other descendants
but not "ours". There is a mention of the above Yisrael in a book
about Chassidut Karlin but with no details about Yisrael except that
his son married into the family of the Lechowitz and Karlin Chassidic
dynasties.

The only other similiar tree was done by the Jerusalem PAPIRNE family
, a Karlin chassidic family , which descends >from Yosef who married
into the Karlin family.

Moadim Lesimcha/Happy Pesach

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Viewmate Translation #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Stephen Brown
 

Dear Fellow Members

I would like to thank those colleagues, especially Robert, Ulrich,
Rodney and Suzie who responded so quickly to my request for a
translation of the certificate of the marriage of my
great-grandparents Abraham Laiban Brickman and Amalie Becker which
took place in Danzig in 1876.

I now have a full translation and a number of new leads to pursue.

I have used Viewmate successfully on a number of occasions and my
research has gained great benefit >from it.

If any member has any information regarding the BRICKMAN or BECKER
from Danzig or the BROWN family >from Gollantsch (now Golancz in
Poland), I would be delighted to hear >from them privately.

Kind regards

Stephen Brown
Manchester UK
smbrown65@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Yisrael (of Ostrog)ben Yosef 19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

I am researching a Yisrael of Ostrog son of Yosef of Breznitz who
lived during the first half of the 19th cent.

We know the following about this Rabbi (?).

He was a follower of the "Ohev Yisrael" of Apta (Heschel). His son
Yosef (possibly Chaim Yosef) married Miriam the sister of R' Shlomo
Chaim of Lechowitz and daughter of R' Aharon and Perl of Karlin
-Stolin. His father, Yosef of Breznitz was a son-in-law of R' Arieh
Leib, the Rav of kremenetzand son of R' Shmuel , also Rav of
Kremenetz. Through these father and son Rabbis he was a descendant of
R' Naftali KATZ , author of the "Smichat Chachamim", and who was a
ggrandson of the MaHaRa"L . Yisrael was also a descendant of the
MaHaRsha"L.

Various published genealogical sources record the above down to R'
Arieh Leib of Kremenetz but >from then only record other descendants
but not "ours". There is a mention of the above Yisrael in a book
about Chassidut Karlin but with no details about Yisrael except that
his son married into the family of the Lechowitz and Karlin Chassidic
dynasties.

The only other similiar tree was done by the Jerusalem PAPIRNE family
, a Karlin chassidic family , which descends >from Yosef who married
into the Karlin family.

Moadim Lesimcha/Happy Pesach

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Auschwitz tattoo numbers photography project #hungary

mishpologia@...
 

Dear H-siggers,

Yom HaShoah is approaching and many will gather to remember the victims.
Between them, there will be some survivors - each year less and less.

The blurred lines of a serial number on a forearm are the image of the
Holocaust. The tattoos of the survivors symbolize the brutality of the
concentration camps. There is no official document that identifies the
people who were subjected to having these numbers tattooed on their arms.

Gabriella Y. Karin, a sculptor and Holocaust survivor (and my aunt), began
the "Auschwitz tattoo numbers photography" project to create a visual
catalogue that identifies the survivors of Auschwitz.

With this project, we are trying to make a visual documentation of this
barbaric happening. Please help us assemble information about as many people
as we can reach.

1) We need a photograph of the person showing their tattoo
2) Photo of the forearm with the number plus a close-up of the number
3) Full name (including maiden name if applicable), city and country where
the person lives
4) The tattoo number written clearly

Please contact:
Gabriella Y. Karin
c/o Los Angeles Museum of Holocaust
6435 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048
Telephone: 323-934-7987
E-mail: auschwitznumbers@...
-------

I can provide a sample of the three photographs needed (which I can't attach
here).

Margarita Lacko
now in Reston, Virginia
e-mail: mishpologia@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Auschwitz tattoo numbers photography project #hungary

mishpologia@...
 

Dear H-siggers,

Yom HaShoah is approaching and many will gather to remember the victims.
Between them, there will be some survivors - each year less and less.

The blurred lines of a serial number on a forearm are the image of the
Holocaust. The tattoos of the survivors symbolize the brutality of the
concentration camps. There is no official document that identifies the
people who were subjected to having these numbers tattooed on their arms.

Gabriella Y. Karin, a sculptor and Holocaust survivor (and my aunt), began
the "Auschwitz tattoo numbers photography" project to create a visual
catalogue that identifies the survivors of Auschwitz.

With this project, we are trying to make a visual documentation of this
barbaric happening. Please help us assemble information about as many people
as we can reach.

1) We need a photograph of the person showing their tattoo
2) Photo of the forearm with the number plus a close-up of the number
3) Full name (including maiden name if applicable), city and country where
the person lives
4) The tattoo number written clearly

Please contact:
Gabriella Y. Karin
c/o Los Angeles Museum of Holocaust
6435 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048
Telephone: 323-934-7987
E-mail: auschwitznumbers@...
-------

I can provide a sample of the three photographs needed (which I can't attach
here).

Margarita Lacko
now in Reston, Virginia
e-mail: mishpologia@...


Kinnui -Yiddish cammon names #general

Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
 

The subject of Kinnuim has been discussed here many=2C many times and Aubrey might
very well go into the JGDG archives for a vast amount of information on the
subject. I have known men who I know had a kinnui being called up with a single
Hebrew name and at other times with both names.

Even though a specific Hebrew name i.e. Yacov was given at the b'rith people
(family, friends and associates) varied the names substantially i.e Yankel, Yankef,
etc. and these names made their way to the records, documents, tombstones, etc.
Some Eastern European languages changed the sound and way names were spelled
according to their part of speech. Furthermore names changed according to spelling
as languages changed, i.e. Russian to Polish, Hungarian to German, etc. Alexander
Beider wrote a long article about this in Avotaynu a couple of years ago.

I'm sorry Aubrey, that's just the way it is.

Interestingly, if my friend Michael Bernet z"l, were able to read this posting, I
am sure that he would have had something interesting and perhaps even funny to say
aboutit but Michael has just now left us. I will miss his remarks. It was one of
his favorite topics.

Joe Fibel

From: aajacobus@...
Can someone clarify the position with regard to the use of Kinnui (common names)
on headstones. I have seen Kinnui used in Polish civil documents and very often
on headstones.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kinnui -Yiddish cammon names #general

Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
 

The subject of Kinnuim has been discussed here many=2C many times and Aubrey might
very well go into the JGDG archives for a vast amount of information on the
subject. I have known men who I know had a kinnui being called up with a single
Hebrew name and at other times with both names.

Even though a specific Hebrew name i.e. Yacov was given at the b'rith people
(family, friends and associates) varied the names substantially i.e Yankel, Yankef,
etc. and these names made their way to the records, documents, tombstones, etc.
Some Eastern European languages changed the sound and way names were spelled
according to their part of speech. Furthermore names changed according to spelling
as languages changed, i.e. Russian to Polish, Hungarian to German, etc. Alexander
Beider wrote a long article about this in Avotaynu a couple of years ago.

I'm sorry Aubrey, that's just the way it is.

Interestingly, if my friend Michael Bernet z"l, were able to read this posting, I
am sure that he would have had something interesting and perhaps even funny to say
aboutit but Michael has just now left us. I will miss his remarks. It was one of
his favorite topics.

Joe Fibel

From: aajacobus@...
Can someone clarify the position with regard to the use of Kinnui (common names)
on headstones. I have seen Kinnui used in Polish civil documents and very often
on headstones.


Shpoler Zeyda Family Tree Project #rabbinic

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

Because he did not consider himself a rabbi, and because he left no writings
or Chassidic dynasty behind, family trees for the great tzaddik, R. Yehuda
Leyb (1726-1812), better known as the Shpoler Zeyda (soundex: Zayda, Zaide,
and American variant Seide), or Saba Kadisha, are rare.

As a Ainikel of the Shpoler Zeyda, I decided to take on the project of
assembling a descendant tree for him. Through this project, Jeff Briskman
and I have so far identified about 350 of the Shpoler Zeyda's descendants,
covering as many as eight generations for certain branches of his family
tree.

However, this is about as far as the existing records will take us. To
complete more branches of his family tree, we will need help >from his
current descendants in the Zeide/Seide families.

We therefore cordially invite anyone who is a descendant of the Shpoler
Zeyda, and who can identify their grandparents, and possibly their
great-grandparents, to help us in completing his family tree.

In exchange for this information, there is a very good chance that we can
provide you with your complete line of descent to the Shpoler Zeyda, and
your contribution to the Shpoler Zeyda family tree project will be
acknowledged in any future publications.

Best Wishes to All,

Jeffrey Mark Paull


IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #rabbinic

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Shpoler Zeyda Family Tree Project #rabbinic

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

Because he did not consider himself a rabbi, and because he left no writings
or Chassidic dynasty behind, family trees for the great tzaddik, R. Yehuda
Leyb (1726-1812), better known as the Shpoler Zeyda (soundex: Zayda, Zaide,
and American variant Seide), or Saba Kadisha, are rare.

As a Ainikel of the Shpoler Zeyda, I decided to take on the project of
assembling a descendant tree for him. Through this project, Jeff Briskman
and I have so far identified about 350 of the Shpoler Zeyda's descendants,
covering as many as eight generations for certain branches of his family
tree.

However, this is about as far as the existing records will take us. To
complete more branches of his family tree, we will need help >from his
current descendants in the Zeide/Seide families.

We therefore cordially invite anyone who is a descendant of the Shpoler
Zeyda, and who can identify their grandparents, and possibly their
great-grandparents, to help us in completing his family tree.

In exchange for this information, there is a very good chance that we can
provide you with your complete line of descent to the Shpoler Zeyda, and
your contribution to the Shpoler Zeyda family tree project will be
acknowledged in any future publications.

Best Wishes to All,

Jeffrey Mark Paull


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #rabbinic

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Concerning Rabbi Herschel Tzvi BIENENFELD #rabbinic

rachack@...
 

I have been asked to find information about the life, works, and
family of Rabbi Herschel Tzvi BIENENFELD, a student of the Gerrer
Rebbe during the Holocaust. An individual in Los Angeles claiming
to be a descendant of his sent me this request.
--
===
Reuven Chaim Klein
Genealogical Researcher
JewishGen ID #106665


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Concerning Rabbi Herschel Tzvi BIENENFELD #rabbinic

rachack@...
 

I have been asked to find information about the life, works, and
family of Rabbi Herschel Tzvi BIENENFELD, a student of the Gerrer
Rebbe during the Holocaust. An individual in Los Angeles claiming
to be a descendant of his sent me this request.
--
===
Reuven Chaim Klein
Genealogical Researcher
JewishGen ID #106665


Re: ZIV #rabbinic

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

I think that this is the family of Rabbi Siff a relative who is now
the rabbi of the Young Israel of the lower East Side (where he has
served nearly 50 years). You can find him in the phone book. Rabbi
Mordechai Jofen lives at *** Avenue I in Brooklyn and might respond
to a phone call or a letter. Are you sure the Alter of Novardok's
name was Ziv, I though this was the family name of the Alter of Kelm.

The reason I assume that Rabbi
Siff is of that family is that he named his son Azriel. Rabbi Azriel
Siff is now the rov of the chasam Sofer Synagogue on the lowier East
Side, and can probably also be contacted by phone.

Best wishes
Avrohom marmorstein

On Mar 24, 2010, at 6:04 AM, Chaim Freedman wrote:

Seeking information about the family of Rabbi Azriel Yehudah ZIV,
author of "Netiv Ez", Baltimore 2007.
In particular, I am interested in his relationship to the family of
Rabbi Mordekhai-Zev YOFFEN, great-grandson of the "Alter of Novardok"
Rabbi Yosef-Yuzl HURWITZ (formerly Ziv).


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: ZIV #rabbinic

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

I think that this is the family of Rabbi Siff a relative who is now
the rabbi of the Young Israel of the lower East Side (where he has
served nearly 50 years). You can find him in the phone book. Rabbi
Mordechai Jofen lives at *** Avenue I in Brooklyn and might respond
to a phone call or a letter. Are you sure the Alter of Novardok's
name was Ziv, I though this was the family name of the Alter of Kelm.

The reason I assume that Rabbi
Siff is of that family is that he named his son Azriel. Rabbi Azriel
Siff is now the rov of the chasam Sofer Synagogue on the lowier East
Side, and can probably also be contacted by phone.

Best wishes
Avrohom marmorstein

On Mar 24, 2010, at 6:04 AM, Chaim Freedman wrote:

Seeking information about the family of Rabbi Azriel Yehudah ZIV,
author of "Netiv Ez", Baltimore 2007.
In particular, I am interested in his relationship to the family of
Rabbi Mordekhai-Zev YOFFEN, great-grandson of the "Alter of Novardok"
Rabbi Yosef-Yuzl HURWITZ (formerly Ziv).


IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #sephardic

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #sephardic

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Re: Family Finder #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

On a statistical basis, there is no reason to choose one gender or the
other for the autosomal testing. Is there a reason to do both? Yes.
Since the SNPs one got >from each of the parent is only half of that parent
SNPs. You and your brother have only about one third of the SNPs the
same, the rest while be different. About one quarter of the SNP of each
of your parent were not pass to either your brother or you. Using this,
half of the matches >from your results, should be the same as half the
matches >from your brother results. Therefore, if you test both of you,
you should get 50% more matches.

What I would suggest to you is have only one person tested and see how
many matches you get. If the number is small, then do not have the other
person tested. However it you get many matches, then it would be worth
getting the other person tested.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #dna

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com