Date   

Chaimovic and Strobel Families #hungary

frishmechlis@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I am researching my Chaimovic family >from Kolocava in Subcarpathia (once the
Austro-Hungerian Empire, later Czechoslovakia, later USSR and now Ukraina)
and the Strobel family >from Subcarpathia (which was also called Ruthenia).

Thanks in advance,

Karl Frish
Hod-Hasharon
Israel

also researching: Frisch family in Balassagyarmat, Nograd county Hungary and
Bratislava in todays Slovakia and Kaufer family in Galanta, Sered and
Bratislava in Slovakia.


Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

tom.vene@...
 

Hello Louis:
I can only speak about what happened in my family. In my family the answer
to your question would be a sound YES. My ancestors not only moved to and
fro different counties, but they also changed residences to distant towns
and villages 150-200 miles apart >from their original abode. This is how I
have in my family two major branches, one that settled to where today is
Slovakia and another that moved to today's Hungary.
Good luck with your search

Tom Venetianer
Sao Paulo-Brazil
email: tom.vene@bol.com.br

-----Original Message-----

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Lois Levick


Hungary SIG #Hungary Chaimovic and Strobel Families #hungary

frishmechlis@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I am researching my Chaimovic family >from Kolocava in Subcarpathia (once the
Austro-Hungerian Empire, later Czechoslovakia, later USSR and now Ukraina)
and the Strobel family >from Subcarpathia (which was also called Ruthenia).

Thanks in advance,

Karl Frish
Hod-Hasharon
Israel

also researching: Frisch family in Balassagyarmat, Nograd county Hungary and
Bratislava in todays Slovakia and Kaufer family in Galanta, Sered and
Bratislava in Slovakia.


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

tom.vene@...
 

Hello Louis:
I can only speak about what happened in my family. In my family the answer
to your question would be a sound YES. My ancestors not only moved to and
fro different counties, but they also changed residences to distant towns
and villages 150-200 miles apart >from their original abode. This is how I
have in my family two major branches, one that settled to where today is
Slovakia and another that moved to today's Hungary.
Good luck with your search

Tom Venetianer
Sao Paulo-Brazil
email: tom.vene@bol.com.br

-----Original Message-----

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Lois Levick


Re: Migration #hungary

pgbakos@...
 

The interesting question of movment between the various counties (megye) of Hungary has been raised.
I can only discuss the revelations of my own family research.
In the case of my Podwinec ancestors, 4 brothers arrived in Hungary >from Bohemia in the period prior to the 1848 Revolution. They settled in three places. Their numerous offspring typically left one male child in the home town and the rest seemed to migrate. So in the period 1860-1900 about two dozen persons (not counting those who went to the US) went to 12 or more different places plus Budapest and one to Vienna. Some had specialized skills, others were simply traders.
In my Rosenberg ancestry movement was a real situation with four successive generations living in four different towns or cities, plus emigration to the US and to Budapest.
The family of my father were Catholics >from western Hungary. My Great grandfather bought land near the county seat and moved most of his family there. His eldest son (my grandfather) went to south Hungary. His grandchildren lived in five or six places.
My friends whose genealogy I have done and who are not Jewish, reflect this sort of mobility as well. The family did not go to Budapest but the did go to towns where there were more opportunities.
Having said all that, I do have one friend whose family has been farming in the same area >from time immemorial.

I think in is hard to make hard and fast rules about migration, but in all of my historical work (including in France) populations were more fluid that we might otherwise think.

Peter Bakos
St-Crespin, France


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:Migration #hungary

pgbakos@...
 

The interesting question of movment between the various counties (megye) of Hungary has been raised.
I can only discuss the revelations of my own family research.
In the case of my Podwinec ancestors, 4 brothers arrived in Hungary >from Bohemia in the period prior to the 1848 Revolution. They settled in three places. Their numerous offspring typically left one male child in the home town and the rest seemed to migrate. So in the period 1860-1900 about two dozen persons (not counting those who went to the US) went to 12 or more different places plus Budapest and one to Vienna. Some had specialized skills, others were simply traders.
In my Rosenberg ancestry movement was a real situation with four successive generations living in four different towns or cities, plus emigration to the US and to Budapest.
The family of my father were Catholics >from western Hungary. My Great grandfather bought land near the county seat and moved most of his family there. His eldest son (my grandfather) went to south Hungary. His grandchildren lived in five or six places.
My friends whose genealogy I have done and who are not Jewish, reflect this sort of mobility as well. The family did not go to Budapest but the did go to towns where there were more opportunities.
Having said all that, I do have one friend whose family has been farming in the same area >from time immemorial.

I think in is hard to make hard and fast rules about migration, but in all of my historical work (including in France) populations were more fluid that we might otherwise think.

Peter Bakos
St-Crespin, France


Books on Hungary #hungary

hekenvin@...
 

There is a bibliograph of books in English about Hungary on the Miskolc website at:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Miskolc/biblio.html

Helene Kenvin
Webmaster, Miskolc website


How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

andrew-s@...
 

I have found that Jewish people travelled all the time. Once railways were
established, travelling >from one end of Hungary to the other was
commonplace, but even before, a merchant with a horse-and-buggy covered
several megyes (really megye'k) during a week's trip; before he had
children, he often took his wife along. Indeed, quite a few children were
born at places away >from home on such trips. In my upcoming book on the
history of one Hungarian Jewish family (tentative title: "Conversations with
my Ancestors"), the places where they were born, married and died include
parts of what was then Hungary >from Nyitra and Bars in the north-west to
Besztercebanya and Gomor in the north-east to Bekes and Csongrad in the
south-east.

Andrew Sanders
Toronto / Haifa

-----Original Message-----
From: Lois Levick [mailto:loisl637@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2010 1:51 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] How common was it to travel between megyes in the
1820/'70's?

Visit our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/
and check out the fabulous All-Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi Genners -

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

I can understand someone travelling to Budapest to try to do well in the big

city, and I understand if a marriage is arranged between two people >from
different areas; however, I don't know if it was that common. I am not
finding people born or married in the same place where they had children,
which makes me wonder if the people I'm finding are not who I was looking
for but have the same name.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick
Bensalem, PA
LEFKOWITZ, Nyirbogat, Hungary; MANDEL, Tarcal, Hungary; MULIARSKY,
Bialobrzegi, Poland; ROSENFELD, Hungary; STOGOFF, Kirovohrad, Ukraine


Hungary SIG #Hungary Books on Hungary #hungary

hekenvin@...
 

There is a bibliograph of books in English about Hungary on the Miskolc website at:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Miskolc/biblio.html

Helene Kenvin
Webmaster, Miskolc website


Hungary SIG #Hungary How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

andrew-s@...
 

I have found that Jewish people travelled all the time. Once railways were
established, travelling >from one end of Hungary to the other was
commonplace, but even before, a merchant with a horse-and-buggy covered
several megyes (really megye'k) during a week's trip; before he had
children, he often took his wife along. Indeed, quite a few children were
born at places away >from home on such trips. In my upcoming book on the
history of one Hungarian Jewish family (tentative title: "Conversations with
my Ancestors"), the places where they were born, married and died include
parts of what was then Hungary >from Nyitra and Bars in the north-west to
Besztercebanya and Gomor in the north-east to Bekes and Csongrad in the
south-east.

Andrew Sanders
Toronto / Haifa

-----Original Message-----
From: Lois Levick [mailto:loisl637@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2010 1:51 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] How common was it to travel between megyes in the
1820/'70's?

Visit our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/
and check out the fabulous All-Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi Genners -

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

I can understand someone travelling to Budapest to try to do well in the big

city, and I understand if a marriage is arranged between two people >from
different areas; however, I don't know if it was that common. I am not
finding people born or married in the same place where they had children,
which makes me wonder if the people I'm finding are not who I was looking
for but have the same name.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick
Bensalem, PA
LEFKOWITZ, Nyirbogat, Hungary; MANDEL, Tarcal, Hungary; MULIARSKY,
Bialobrzegi, Poland; ROSENFELD, Hungary; STOGOFF, Kirovohrad, Ukraine


Traveling to Mukacheve--Is a Hungarian speaking guide needed? #hungary

Preeva@...
 

Hello, Genners,
I am traveling to Mukacheve to research my father and grandparents, who =
lived in Mukacheve and spoke Hungarian. Did any of you take a guide to =
Mukacheve, and did they speak Hungarian? Who do you recommend?
Thank you,
Preeva Tramiel=

Moderator: Please respond off-list if you have suggestions.


Re: Solve a puzzle - where is this funeral, and who is being buried? #hungary

joe@...
 

My apologies to all the kind responders - I accidentally omitted the
Viewmate address of these photos. They can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=15294 and
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=15293

Thanks again
Joe Slater,
Melbourne,
Australia


Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

joe@...
 

My great-great-grandfather SCHEINER Peter was born in Csenger in 1820
but died in Torokszentmiklos in 1906 after raising a large family
there. That's a distance of more than 200 kilometres or 130 miles. I
think one reason that Jews in that period moved was because they
suddenly *could*. Many of these towns had just been opened to Jewish
residence,and people were looking for new opportunities.

Joe Slater
Melbourne,
Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Traveling to Mukacheve--Is a Hungarian speaking guide needed? #hungary

Preeva@...
 

Hello, Genners,
I am traveling to Mukacheve to research my father and grandparents, who =
lived in Mukacheve and spoke Hungarian. Did any of you take a guide to =
Mukacheve, and did they speak Hungarian? Who do you recommend?
Thank you,
Preeva Tramiel=

Moderator: Please respond off-list if you have suggestions.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Solve a puzzle - where is this funeral, and who is being buried? #hungary

joe@...
 

My apologies to all the kind responders - I accidentally omitted the
Viewmate address of these photos. They can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=15294 and
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=15293

Thanks again
Joe Slater,
Melbourne,
Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

joe@...
 

My great-great-grandfather SCHEINER Peter was born in Csenger in 1820
but died in Torokszentmiklos in 1906 after raising a large family
there. That's a distance of more than 200 kilometres or 130 miles. I
think one reason that Jews in that period moved was because they
suddenly *could*. Many of these towns had just been opened to Jewish
residence,and people were looking for new opportunities.

Joe Slater
Melbourne,
Australia


Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #general

Jeff at SG
 

I forgot to name the award Schelly won.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the Award of
Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources. Dardashti, a native New
Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her article Ties That
Bind: Jewish Research Strategies published in the September 2009 issue
of Family Tree Magazine.

Jeff Malka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #general

Jeff at SG
 

I forgot to name the award Schelly won.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the Award of
Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources. Dardashti, a native New
Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her article Ties That
Bind: Jewish Research Strategies published in the September 2009 issue
of Family Tree Magazine.

Jeff Malka


Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #general

Jeff at SG
 

Schelly Dardashti, founder of Tracing the Tribe

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the

Our Schelly Dardashti wins a prstigious award!

Schelly, a native New Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her
article "Ties That Bind: Jewish Research Strategies" published in the
September 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

We all know Schelly as a tireless Jewish researcher, journalist, blogger
(Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog and MyHeritage Genealogy
Blog), online instructor, and international speaker. She was the
Jerusalem Post genealogy columnist (“It’s All Relative,” 1995-2005),
taught online Jewish genealogy at MyFamily.com, and is co-founder of
GenClass.com. Also a former three-term president of the Jewish Family
Research Association Israel.

Bravo Schelly for this well deserved distinction. The National
Genealogical Society is the most prestigious genealogical society in the US.

Jeff Malka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #general

Jeff at SG
 

Schelly Dardashti, founder of Tracing the Tribe

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the

Our Schelly Dardashti wins a prstigious award!

Schelly, a native New Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her
article "Ties That Bind: Jewish Research Strategies" published in the
September 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

We all know Schelly as a tireless Jewish researcher, journalist, blogger
(Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog and MyHeritage Genealogy
Blog), online instructor, and international speaker. She was the
Jerusalem Post genealogy columnist (“It’s All Relative,” 1995-2005),
taught online Jewish genealogy at MyFamily.com, and is co-founder of
GenClass.com. Also a former three-term president of the Jewish Family
Research Association Israel.

Bravo Schelly for this well deserved distinction. The National
Genealogical Society is the most prestigious genealogical society in the US.

Jeff Malka