Date   

Descendants of David KATZENSTEIN (Rhina/New York) #usa

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I've cross-posted this to the EarlyAmerican and GerSig lists in the
hopes that someone will recognise the family below.

David KATZENSTEIN was a brother of my ancestor Lob aka Leopold
KATZENSTEIN and his sister Jettchen KATZENSTEIN NUSSBAUM. If anyone
has additional information about this family I'd be most appreciative.
I'd like to obtain the rest of the information on this branch of the
family and get in touch with descendants.

David KATZENSTEIN (son of Abraham, grandson of Mayer, great-grandson
of David haKohen, great-great-grandson of Me'ir) was born 29 Nov 1836
in Rhina, Kreis Hünfeld, Hessen, Germany, and died 05 Feb 1913 in New
York, NY. He immigrated to New York in 1853 and married Anna or
Emma in 1857 in United States of America. She was born Abt. 1845, and
died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in United States of America.

The 1880 census lists David's occupation as Furniture Store.

Notes for Anna or Emma:

1880 census lists name as Emma and birth in 1836 but this may be incorrect.
1900 census lists name as Anna and birth in 1845.
1910 census lists husband David as widower.

Children of David KATZENSTEIN and Anna Emma are:

Elizabeth KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1860 in United States of America.
Henrietta KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
Fanny KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1864 in United States of America.
Matilda KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1867 in United States of America.
Meyer D KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1877 in United States of America. He
married Hattie Sommerfeld 04 Nov 1900 in New York, New York.

The 1880 census lists Meyer D KATZENSTEIN's birth in 1877 however the
1900 census lists birth in 1867. I'm not sure which is correct.

Henrietta KATZENSTEIN was born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
She married Alfred REISER. He was born Abt. 1856.

Child of Henrietta KATZENSTEIN and Alfred REISER is:
Milton A REISER, born Abt. 1889 in United States of America.

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof, London, United Kingdon steven.leof@...


Early American SIG #USA Descendants of David KATZENSTEIN (Rhina/New York) #usa

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I've cross-posted this to the EarlyAmerican and GerSig lists in the
hopes that someone will recognise the family below.

David KATZENSTEIN was a brother of my ancestor Lob aka Leopold
KATZENSTEIN and his sister Jettchen KATZENSTEIN NUSSBAUM. If anyone
has additional information about this family I'd be most appreciative.
I'd like to obtain the rest of the information on this branch of the
family and get in touch with descendants.

David KATZENSTEIN (son of Abraham, grandson of Mayer, great-grandson
of David haKohen, great-great-grandson of Me'ir) was born 29 Nov 1836
in Rhina, Kreis Hünfeld, Hessen, Germany, and died 05 Feb 1913 in New
York, NY. He immigrated to New York in 1853 and married Anna or
Emma in 1857 in United States of America. She was born Abt. 1845, and
died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in United States of America.

The 1880 census lists David's occupation as Furniture Store.

Notes for Anna or Emma:

1880 census lists name as Emma and birth in 1836 but this may be incorrect.
1900 census lists name as Anna and birth in 1845.
1910 census lists husband David as widower.

Children of David KATZENSTEIN and Anna Emma are:

Elizabeth KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1860 in United States of America.
Henrietta KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
Fanny KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1864 in United States of America.
Matilda KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1867 in United States of America.
Meyer D KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1877 in United States of America. He
married Hattie Sommerfeld 04 Nov 1900 in New York, New York.

The 1880 census lists Meyer D KATZENSTEIN's birth in 1877 however the
1900 census lists birth in 1867. I'm not sure which is correct.

Henrietta KATZENSTEIN was born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
She married Alfred REISER. He was born Abt. 1856.

Child of Henrietta KATZENSTEIN and Alfred REISER is:
Milton A REISER, born Abt. 1889 in United States of America.

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof, London, United Kingdon steven.leof@...


Marriage restrictions for Jews in Bohemian in the 1800s Chanoch Gluck son of Gedalha #austria-czech

henry@...
 

Hi all,

I was reading through the emails regarding the marriage restrictions for Jews in Bohemian in the early 1800s.
I was told that my ancestor Chanoch Henich GLUCK came >from Prague, Bohemia to Papa, Hungary in order to
be able to get married since the marriage restriction for the jews in Bohemia. He took the surname GLUCK
after being in Hungary. Would it be possible to find records of him prior to his arrival to Hungary? I believe
his fathers name was Gedalia. I have the records for the birth of all his children and grandchildren. His
youngest son was named Gedalia born in 15 Feb 1796 in Papa.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Henry Schwartz

Moderator Note: Please include your city with your signature.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Marriage restrictions for Jews in Bohemian in the 1800s Chanoch Gluck son of Gedalha #austria-czech

henry@...
 

Hi all,

I was reading through the emails regarding the marriage restrictions for Jews in Bohemian in the early 1800s.
I was told that my ancestor Chanoch Henich GLUCK came >from Prague, Bohemia to Papa, Hungary in order to
be able to get married since the marriage restriction for the jews in Bohemia. He took the surname GLUCK
after being in Hungary. Would it be possible to find records of him prior to his arrival to Hungary? I believe
his fathers name was Gedalia. I have the records for the birth of all his children and grandchildren. His
youngest son was named Gedalia born in 15 Feb 1796 in Papa.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Henry Schwartz

Moderator Note: Please include your city with your signature.


Descendants of David KATZENSTEIN (Rhina/New York) #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I've cross-posted this to the EarlyAmerican and GerSig lists in the
hopes that someone will recognise the family below.

David KATZENSTEIN was a brother of my ancestor Lob aka Leopold
KATZENSTEIN and his sister Jettchen KATZENSTEIN NUSSBAUM. If anyone
has additional information about this family I'd be most appreciative.
I'd like to obtain the rest of the information on this branch of the
family and get in touch with descendants.

David KATZENSTEIN (son of Abraham, grandson of Mayer, great-grandson
of David haKohen, great-great-grandson of Me'ir) was born 29 Nov 1836
in Rhina, Kreis H=FCnfeld, Hessen, Germany, and died 05 Feb 1913 in New
York, NY. He immigrated to New York in 1853 and married Anna or
Emma in 1857 in United States of America. She was born Abt. 1845, and
died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in United States of America.

The 1880 census lists David's occupation as Furniture Store.

Notes for Anna or Emma:

1880 census lists name as Emma and birth in 1836 but this may be incorrect.
1900 census lists name as Anna and birth in 1845.
1910 census lists husband David as widower.

Children of David KATZENSTEIN and Anna Emma are:

Elizabeth KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1860 in United States of America.
Henrietta KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
Fanny KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1864 in United States of America.
Matilda KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1867 in United States of America.
Meyer D KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1877 in United States of America. He
married Hattie Sommerfeld 04 Nov 1900 in New York, New York.

The 1880 census lists Meyer D KATZENSTEIN's birth in 1877 however the
1900 census lists birth in 1867. I'm not sure which is correct.

Henrietta KATZENSTEIN was born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
She married Alfred REISER. He was born Abt. 1856.

Child of Henrietta KATZENSTEIN and Alfred REISER is:
Milton A REISER, born Abt. 1889 in United States of America.

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof. London, United Kingdom steven.leof@...


German SIG #Germany Descendants of David KATZENSTEIN (Rhina/New York) #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I've cross-posted this to the EarlyAmerican and GerSig lists in the
hopes that someone will recognise the family below.

David KATZENSTEIN was a brother of my ancestor Lob aka Leopold
KATZENSTEIN and his sister Jettchen KATZENSTEIN NUSSBAUM. If anyone
has additional information about this family I'd be most appreciative.
I'd like to obtain the rest of the information on this branch of the
family and get in touch with descendants.

David KATZENSTEIN (son of Abraham, grandson of Mayer, great-grandson
of David haKohen, great-great-grandson of Me'ir) was born 29 Nov 1836
in Rhina, Kreis H=FCnfeld, Hessen, Germany, and died 05 Feb 1913 in New
York, NY. He immigrated to New York in 1853 and married Anna or
Emma in 1857 in United States of America. She was born Abt. 1845, and
died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in United States of America.

The 1880 census lists David's occupation as Furniture Store.

Notes for Anna or Emma:

1880 census lists name as Emma and birth in 1836 but this may be incorrect.
1900 census lists name as Anna and birth in 1845.
1910 census lists husband David as widower.

Children of David KATZENSTEIN and Anna Emma are:

Elizabeth KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1860 in United States of America.
Henrietta KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
Fanny KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1864 in United States of America.
Matilda KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1867 in United States of America.
Meyer D KATZENSTEIN, born Abt. 1877 in United States of America. He
married Hattie Sommerfeld 04 Nov 1900 in New York, New York.

The 1880 census lists Meyer D KATZENSTEIN's birth in 1877 however the
1900 census lists birth in 1867. I'm not sure which is correct.

Henrietta KATZENSTEIN was born Abt. 1862 in United States of America.
She married Alfred REISER. He was born Abt. 1856.

Child of Henrietta KATZENSTEIN and Alfred REISER is:
Milton A REISER, born Abt. 1889 in United States of America.

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof. London, United Kingdom steven.leof@...


LOEB and KULLMANN families of GEMUNDEN in the RHINELAND PALATINATE #germany

Alba <a_m_g@...>
 

Seeking information about the families of my g-g-grandmother Adelheid
KULLMANN. I believe she was born in Gemunden in the Rhineland-Palatinate
area of Germany approx 200 years ago.

Adelheid KULLMANN was the mother of Regina MAIER, who in turn was the mother
of Olga HERZ, my grandmother.

Adelheid KULLMANN
Birth: circa 1814 - Gemunden, Germany
Death: December 1, 1884 (70) - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
Daughter of Josef KULLMANN and Karoline LOEB
Wife of Josef MAIER (c.1814 - 1884)

Children of Adelheid KULLMANN and Josef MAIER:
Jakob MAIER B: 1846 - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany D: August 15, 1928
Moses MAIER B: 1855 - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate D: December 13, 1926
*** Regina MAIER - B. December 25, 1853 - Veldenz; D. April 19, 1927 in
Polch, Rhineland-Palatinate

Thanks for any help, Alba Gross, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada a_m_g@...


German SIG #Germany LOEB and KULLMANN families of GEMUNDEN in the RHINELAND PALATINATE #germany

Alba <a_m_g@...>
 

Seeking information about the families of my g-g-grandmother Adelheid
KULLMANN. I believe she was born in Gemunden in the Rhineland-Palatinate
area of Germany approx 200 years ago.

Adelheid KULLMANN was the mother of Regina MAIER, who in turn was the mother
of Olga HERZ, my grandmother.

Adelheid KULLMANN
Birth: circa 1814 - Gemunden, Germany
Death: December 1, 1884 (70) - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
Daughter of Josef KULLMANN and Karoline LOEB
Wife of Josef MAIER (c.1814 - 1884)

Children of Adelheid KULLMANN and Josef MAIER:
Jakob MAIER B: 1846 - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany D: August 15, 1928
Moses MAIER B: 1855 - Veldenz, Rhineland-Palatinate D: December 13, 1926
*** Regina MAIER - B. December 25, 1853 - Veldenz; D. April 19, 1927 in
Polch, Rhineland-Palatinate

Thanks for any help, Alba Gross, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada a_m_g@...


Translation request - Marriage Certificate in German #germany

Stephen Brown
 

Dear Fellow Members - I have posted on Viewmate two images.

They are the two sides of the Marraiage Certificate of my
great-grandparents, Abraham Laib BRICKMAN and Amalie BECKER. They were married
in 1876 in what was then Danzig. The certificate is a printed pro-forma in
German "Gothic" Characters with the personal details handwritten in beautiful,\
neat (but unfortunately not understood by me), German script.

I would be very grateful if a fellow member would be kind enough to
offer me a full translation of the document. It is displayed on
Viewmate as VM 14985 and VM 14988. With best wishes for Pesach

Stephen Brown Membership No 342258 Manchester UK smbrown65@...


German SIG #Germany Translation request - Marriage Certificate in German #germany

Stephen Brown
 

Dear Fellow Members - I have posted on Viewmate two images.

They are the two sides of the Marraiage Certificate of my
great-grandparents, Abraham Laib BRICKMAN and Amalie BECKER. They were married
in 1876 in what was then Danzig. The certificate is a printed pro-forma in
German "Gothic" Characters with the personal details handwritten in beautiful,\
neat (but unfortunately not understood by me), German script.

I would be very grateful if a fellow member would be kind enough to
offer me a full translation of the document. It is displayed on
Viewmate as VM 14985 and VM 14988. With best wishes for Pesach

Stephen Brown Membership No 342258 Manchester UK smbrown65@...


IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #belarus

bounce-2001120-772948@...
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus IAJGS 2010 Conference Update! #belarus

bounce-2001120-772948@...
 

The IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is less then
four months away and JGSLA conference planners are working round the
clock to design a spectacular program for you. In a week's time we
will announce the full schedule, so check our website for updated
information -- or subscribe to our newsletter at:
http://www.jgsla2010.com. The conference will take place >from July
11-16 (early bird options beginning July 9) at the JW Marriott at
L.A. Live in the new entertainment and cultural district of downtown
Los Angeles.

Here are a few sneak previews:

We're honored to announce that University of Massachusetts Boston
Professor Vincent Cannato will give the Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture
this year, discussing his new book: "American Passage: The History of
Ellis Island," the first full history of America's landmark port of
entry, >from immigration post to deportation center to mythical icon.
"American Passage" captures a time and place unparalleled in American
immigration and history, and articulates the dramatic and bittersweet
accounts of the immigrants, officials, interpreters, and social
reformers who all play an important role in Ellis Island's chronicle.

In our age of advanced computer technology and instant electronic
mail, the picture postcard is a charming vestige of the past. Created
in 1869, this innovation afforded the opportunity to send mail
inexpensively, and European and American Jews participated fully in
the "Postcard Craze". The custom of sending a New Year's message is
documented as early as the fourteenth century when the Maharil, Rabbi
Jacob of Moellin (1360?-1427), recommended that during the month of
Elul one should include wishes for a good year in all written
correspondence. This custom spread widely throughout the Ashkenazic
world. Hebrew University of Jerusalem professor Shalom Sabar will
elaborate on this phenomena in his lecture: "Between Germany and
Poland -- Jewish Life and Rituals on Late 19th to Early 20th century
Illustrated Jewish Postcards." Jewish postcards offer the past and
present spectator with rare and almost immediate documentation of
important events in the life of the Jewish people: the early Zionist
congresses, the building of new settlements and towns in Eretz Israel,
the emigration >from Europe and arrival in the New World. As such,
Jewish picture postcards are a fascinating visual resource for the
study of Jewish history and the lives of our ancestors.

Sabar will also discuss, "The Sephardi Ketubbah Before and After the
Expulsion" (as a research tool for genealogy), and "Childbirth and
Magic -- Jewish Amulets and Popular Beliefs in the Pre-Modern Era" in
which he will explore Jewish mid-wifery customs.

No one can deny the influence of those Jewish pioneers who headed
west, not in search of gold, but in search of better weather for
filmmaking. The birth of the movie studios had far-reaching
repercussions years after the influx of those early silent filmmakers.
Discussing that topic will be author, Vincent Brook on: "Ost Meets
West: Immigrant Jewish Moguls, Emigre Jewish Directors, and the Rise
of Film Noir." The Hollywood film industry was founded largely by a
group of immigrant Ostjuden (Eastern European Jews), who ended up
heading most of the major American film studios. Another influx of
Westj=FCdische (German/Austrian Jewish) film directors were driven to
the U.S. by the Nazis in the 1930s, and a number of these men would
play a determining role in the rise of a dark crime genre later called
film noir. Brook will examine the ethnic origins of these filmmakers
and the part their different backgrounds played in their considerable
contributions to American cinema.

For another angle on Hollywood -- and on the fast (Jewish) crowd in
Roaring Twenties' Chicago -- popular genealogical speaker Robin
Seidenberg will entertain us with: "My Uncle, the Hollywood Producer:
A Spicy Tale," and "The Kissing Blonde," demonstrating research
techniques to unearth family scandals using historical newspapers and
good old fashioned detective work.

from the Jewish Genealogical Learning Center in Warsaw, Polish
experts Yale Reisner and Anna Przybyszewska-Droz will be covering the
following topics: "How to Do Genealogy Research in Poland -- And How
Not to: Potential and Pitfalls," "Grandma's Name Was Rosenberg: Am I
Jewish? Uniquely Jewish Surnames -- What They Prove, and What They
Don't," "The Lost Tribes of Poland: Apostasy, Intermarriage and Jewish
Genealogy in Poland" and "A Different Memory: Poles, Jews & What We
Think We Know About Them."

Need to think out-of-the-box when it comes to making research breakthroughs?

Maureen Taylor, the "Photo Detective" will analyze photographic
questions posed on JewishGen's Viewmate over the years, and will be
available for private consultations, while Ava (a.k.a. "Sherlock")
Cohn, whose ancestors hail >from Belarus, Romania, Ukraine and the
Austrian Empire, will show us how to mine clues purposely left for us
by our immigrant ancestors in their photographic portraits. TV news
producer and reporter, Leron Kornreich, will show you how to use
multi-media and reporting skills to document your family history with
: "Razzle Dazzle 'em: Using Technology to Present Your Family History
Research with Pizzazz," "Breaking News: A Reporter's Guide to
Genealogical Research," and "Using Video to Capture Roots & Shtetl
Travel."

With the success of the U.S. version of the TV show "Who Do You Think
You Are," more people are turning to Ancestry.com to learn more about
their family history, and their expert teachers will be offering a
full slate of classes on how to make the get the most our of those
resources. They'll also provide a free scanning service (by
appointment at the conference) for anyone who wants to bring their
photos and documents to be preserved digitally.

Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will put on a "JewishGen LIVE at
L.A. LIVE" extravaganza to fill you in their latest databases and
searching capabilities, and our favorite one-stepper, Steve Morse,
will be giving a series of lectures on his popular website offerings,
with a special detour to present "DNA and the Animal Kingdom:
Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World" with his daughter, Megan.

from the gold-rush to gunovim, geo-tagging to gazetteers, we'll be
spanning the globe to bring you experts, archivists, professors and
authors, who will bring genealogy to life and take you place you never
thought you could go with your research. Whether you are a
mind-mapper or Google geek, PC-pusher or Mac-Maven, Litvak,
Galitzianer or "somewhere in Russia" seeker, there's a place for you
at our conference! If you never attended a one before, make this the
year you take the plunge (into our genealogist-infested waters) and
join us.

Coming soon will be more information on hands-on classes, SIGs and
BOFs, films, breakfasts, and tours. Stay tuned!

(or check us out at: http://www.JGSLA2010.com)

See you in July!

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, Co-Chair
IAJGS 2010 Conference Los Angeles
info@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Maine LD 1781 Passed Bith Chambers March 28, 2010 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

My previous e-mails to this forum-and the most recent IAJGS Legislative Alert
( www.iajgs.org click on Public Access, or Legislation button, then latest alerts)
discussed a bill in Maine (LD1781) that would require those not included in the
definition of "direct and legitimate" interest to obtain birth, marriage, divorce
and death records 100 years after the date of the occurrence. As a result of the
genealogical community being concerned with the impact of going >from a "total
access" state to one waiting 100 years, the Joint Committee on Health and Human
Services added an amendment (that was not shown to or discussed with the
genealogical community before its inclusion) requiring those doing genealogical
research to obtain a researcher identification card to obtain an informational copy
of the record. The researcher identification card has a $50 annual fee on top of
any cost of obtaining the records. The legislators believe that they "opened"
access rather than restricted it with the new provisions.

While the genealogical community, including IAJGS tried to get the wording amended,
specifically to include genealogists in the definition of "direct and legitimate"
we were advised today- March 29, 2010 of the following:
Movement occurred on LD 1781 which did not appear in the house or senate agendas.
The bill was read in both chambers Friday, March 26, with the amendment [>from
Health and Human Service Committee that requires the researcher card]. The bill
has been "engrossed" by the house which means the final draft with the amendment
(so) will be drawn up and then brought to the house for a vote. There is no chance
of getting any changes in the bill during this session.

If genealogists can show there is a change in access (if, for example, town clerks
start demanding the Office of Vital Records research identification card or the
State Archives & libraries deny access to records already available to the public),
then the topic can be presented as a new bill in the next session (January 2011)."

We were also advised that Christine Zukav-Lesser, Deputy Director of the Maine
CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), said the Maine CDC will be
pulling together a workgroup of representatives of the municipal clerks as well as
a genealogist representative to work with them to determine the most appropriate
method for documenting a "direct and legitimate interest."

This was a bill sponsored by the governor and Ms. Zukav-Lesser testified at the
March 4 hearing for the need to restrict the release of birth and marriage records
as a way to combat fraud and identity theft.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-large and
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Maine LD 1781 Passed Bith Chambers March 28, 2010 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

My previous e-mails to this forum-and the most recent IAJGS Legislative Alert
( www.iajgs.org click on Public Access, or Legislation button, then latest alerts)
discussed a bill in Maine (LD1781) that would require those not included in the
definition of "direct and legitimate" interest to obtain birth, marriage, divorce
and death records 100 years after the date of the occurrence. As a result of the
genealogical community being concerned with the impact of going >from a "total
access" state to one waiting 100 years, the Joint Committee on Health and Human
Services added an amendment (that was not shown to or discussed with the
genealogical community before its inclusion) requiring those doing genealogical
research to obtain a researcher identification card to obtain an informational copy
of the record. The researcher identification card has a $50 annual fee on top of
any cost of obtaining the records. The legislators believe that they "opened"
access rather than restricted it with the new provisions.

While the genealogical community, including IAJGS tried to get the wording amended,
specifically to include genealogists in the definition of "direct and legitimate"
we were advised today- March 29, 2010 of the following:
Movement occurred on LD 1781 which did not appear in the house or senate agendas.
The bill was read in both chambers Friday, March 26, with the amendment [>from
Health and Human Service Committee that requires the researcher card]. The bill
has been "engrossed" by the house which means the final draft with the amendment
(so) will be drawn up and then brought to the house for a vote. There is no chance
of getting any changes in the bill during this session.

If genealogists can show there is a change in access (if, for example, town clerks
start demanding the Office of Vital Records research identification card or the
State Archives & libraries deny access to records already available to the public),
then the topic can be presented as a new bill in the next session (January 2011)."

We were also advised that Christine Zukav-Lesser, Deputy Director of the Maine
CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), said the Maine CDC will be
pulling together a workgroup of representatives of the municipal clerks as well as
a genealogist representative to work with them to determine the most appropriate
method for documenting a "direct and legitimate interest."

This was a bill sponsored by the governor and Ms. Zukav-Lesser testified at the
March 4 hearing for the need to restrict the release of birth and marriage records
as a way to combat fraud and identity theft.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-large and
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Family surname search #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

More than a year has passed since I last listed surnames I have been researching on
this JewishGen message board for so many years! In the past 12 months, I have found
much success - with cousins finding me online, and contacting me to see if we were
related. Yes! have also been successful through constant researching of various
departments in NARA [National Archives Records Administration], LitvakSig Internal
Passports, Facebook, JRIPoland, Maryland State Archives, leads through my JewishGen
on-line friends, newspaper archives and other resources.

Perhaps there is someone new online who may recognize a name on the following list
of my surname search and the areas in which my family lived.

ABELMAN: Raseiniai, Kaunas - Lithuania
AVNER/AWNER: Lviv, Ternopol, Ukraine; Manchester, England; TelAviv, Israel
DOROGOI: Kaunas, Lithuania EHRENPREIS: Lviv, [Lemburg], Ukraine
FRIEDHOFFER: Lviv, Ukraine; Tel Aviv, Israel
FRUCHT/FRUKT [FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN]: Ukmerge, Vilnius, Moletai, Kaunas, Lithuania;
Bayonne, New Jersey LENTOTCHNIK [LENT]: Zhitomir, Ukraine; Buenos Aires,
Argentina; Minnesota, Maryland, USA MELC: Ukmerge, Lithuania
NOUSSINOFF [NUSINOV: Zhitomir, Ukraine; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Israel; Maryland,
New York, USA SHEINKEROVICH: Ukmerge, Kaunas - Lithuania
WECHSLER/WEXSLER: Tarnopol/Ternopol, Ukraine

Thank you - and good luck in your own research!

Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Genealogical Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, FL


Births records. Valdemarpils. 1888 #latvia

usdine@...
 

Subject: Births records. Valdemarpils. 1888
From: Christine Usdin
usdine@...


http://www.premiumorange.com/rigavitalrecords/birthsvaldemarpilseightyeight.html
Hag Pessah Sameah!

Christine Usdin
usdine@...


--


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family surname search #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

More than a year has passed since I last listed surnames I have been researching on
this JewishGen message board for so many years! In the past 12 months, I have found
much success - with cousins finding me online, and contacting me to see if we were
related. Yes! have also been successful through constant researching of various
departments in NARA [National Archives Records Administration], LitvakSig Internal
Passports, Facebook, JRIPoland, Maryland State Archives, leads through my JewishGen
on-line friends, newspaper archives and other resources.

Perhaps there is someone new online who may recognize a name on the following list
of my surname search and the areas in which my family lived.

ABELMAN: Raseiniai, Kaunas - Lithuania
AVNER/AWNER: Lviv, Ternopol, Ukraine; Manchester, England; TelAviv, Israel
DOROGOI: Kaunas, Lithuania EHRENPREIS: Lviv, [Lemburg], Ukraine
FRIEDHOFFER: Lviv, Ukraine; Tel Aviv, Israel
FRUCHT/FRUKT [FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN]: Ukmerge, Vilnius, Moletai, Kaunas, Lithuania;
Bayonne, New Jersey LENTOTCHNIK [LENT]: Zhitomir, Ukraine; Buenos Aires,
Argentina; Minnesota, Maryland, USA MELC: Ukmerge, Lithuania
NOUSSINOFF [NUSINOV: Zhitomir, Ukraine; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Israel; Maryland,
New York, USA SHEINKEROVICH: Ukmerge, Kaunas - Lithuania
WECHSLER/WEXSLER: Tarnopol/Ternopol, Ukraine

Thank you - and good luck in your own research!

Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Genealogical Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, FL


Latvia SIG #Latvia Births records. Valdemarpils. 1888 #latvia

usdine@...
 

Subject: Births records. Valdemarpils. 1888
From: Christine Usdin
usdine@...


http://www.premiumorange.com/rigavitalrecords/birthsvaldemarpilseightyeight.html
Hag Pessah Sameah!

Christine Usdin
usdine@...


--


"Vin", "Win", "Bin" or "Ben" - Origins of a name #galicia

Brian J. Lenius <brian@...>
 

I have had opportunity to see several documents that refer to the
name "Winowicz" as a patronymic name. Although Winowicz is a
valid Polish or Ukrainian surname, in the case of these particular
documents it is clearly used as the patronymic name.

As an example of patronymics, the name Iwan Stefanowicz
Kowalczuk would be Iwan (the son of Stefan) Kowalczuk. Other
patronymics are also used as surnames, such as names like
Iwanowicz (son of Iwan), Fedorowicz (son of Fedor), etc.

Could the name Winowicz be a patronymic for "son of Win"?
Eastern Slavs (Ukrainians, Russians) sometimes use the "V" in
place of the western Slav (Polish) "B" as in "Vasyl" in place of "
Basil". Therefore could "Vin" be derived >from "Bin" or maybe
"Ben" as found among Jewish names?

To show that Jewish given names can also be found in Jewish
patronymic names and that this is not just a Slavic
phenomenon, the names of a couple of Jewish landlord families
in Galicia were Rabinowicz (son of Rabin) and Abrahamowicz
(son of Abraham). Any ideas or references would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Best Regards,

Brian J. Lenius
Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia "Vin", "Win", "Bin" or "Ben" - Origins of a name #galicia

Brian J. Lenius <brian@...>
 

I have had opportunity to see several documents that refer to the
name "Winowicz" as a patronymic name. Although Winowicz is a
valid Polish or Ukrainian surname, in the case of these particular
documents it is clearly used as the patronymic name.

As an example of patronymics, the name Iwan Stefanowicz
Kowalczuk would be Iwan (the son of Stefan) Kowalczuk. Other
patronymics are also used as surnames, such as names like
Iwanowicz (son of Iwan), Fedorowicz (son of Fedor), etc.

Could the name Winowicz be a patronymic for "son of Win"?
Eastern Slavs (Ukrainians, Russians) sometimes use the "V" in
place of the western Slav (Polish) "B" as in "Vasyl" in place of "
Basil". Therefore could "Vin" be derived >from "Bin" or maybe
"Ben" as found among Jewish names?

To show that Jewish given names can also be found in Jewish
patronymic names and that this is not just a Slavic
phenomenon, the names of a couple of Jewish landlord families
in Galicia were Rabinowicz (son of Rabin) and Abrahamowicz
(son of Abraham). Any ideas or references would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Best Regards,

Brian J. Lenius
Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada