Date   

Announcing IGS Twitter #warsaw #poland

rosef@...
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its TWITTER. This TWITTER will
keep you up to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as
they are announced on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially
helpful for those who find it difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English.
Follow us on http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Rose Feldman
IGS webmistress


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Announcing IGS Twitter #warsaw #poland

rosef@...
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its TWITTER. This TWITTER will
keep you up to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as
they are announced on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially
helpful for those who find it difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English.
Follow us on http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Rose Feldman
IGS webmistress


Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Announcing IGS Twitter #rabbinic

Billie Stein <billie.stein@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its Twitter. This Twitter will
keep you up to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as
they are announced on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially
helpful for those who find it difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English.
Follow us on http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Billie Stein
President, Tel Aviv Branch IGS


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Announcing IGS Twitter #rabbinic

Billie Stein <billie.stein@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its Twitter. This Twitter will
keep you up to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as
they are announced on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially
helpful for those who find it difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English.
Follow us on http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Billie Stein
President, Tel Aviv Branch IGS


Re: Could Family Finder tests tell when MCRA lived? #dna

DonnDevine@...
 

If the MRCA were no further back than a 4-gt grandparent (related as
fifth-cousins), the FF results could confirm a relationship, and point
to how close it might be--but at the 4th or 5th cousin distance, or even
closer in a few cases, results as reported might also show no match .
The extent to which identical segments of DNA are passed on to
descendants varies by chance, as does the occurrence of mutations among
Y-DNA descendants of a common male-line ancestor, so answers must be in
terms of probabilities.

Donn Devine
Wilmington DE

Sidney Sachs wrote:

From: sachs@nova.org
Date: Fri, 28 May 2010 14:47:31 -0400 (EDT)

I run a Y-haplotype group for J2b with the value on DYS455 of 8. I found
two persons that were a perfect match with 37 Y-markers. One had a foster
father who was born during WWII. I was wondering if both have
FamilyTreeDNA's Family Finder test, >from their results, could we tell when
their MCRA lived?


DNA Research #DNA Re: Could Family Finder tests tell when MCRA lived? #dna

DonnDevine@...
 

If the MRCA were no further back than a 4-gt grandparent (related as
fifth-cousins), the FF results could confirm a relationship, and point
to how close it might be--but at the 4th or 5th cousin distance, or even
closer in a few cases, results as reported might also show no match .
The extent to which identical segments of DNA are passed on to
descendants varies by chance, as does the occurrence of mutations among
Y-DNA descendants of a common male-line ancestor, so answers must be in
terms of probabilities.

Donn Devine
Wilmington DE

Sidney Sachs wrote:

From: sachs@nova.org
Date: Fri, 28 May 2010 14:47:31 -0400 (EDT)

I run a Y-haplotype group for J2b with the value on DYS455 of 8. I found
two persons that were a perfect match with 37 Y-markers. One had a foster
father who was born during WWII. I was wondering if both have
FamilyTreeDNA's Family Finder test, >from their results, could we tell when
their MCRA lived?


Question: Could Family Finder tests tell when MCRA lived? #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

I run a Y-haplotype group for J2b with the value on DYS455 of 8. I found
two persons that were a perfect match with 37 Y-markers. One had a foster
father who was born during WWII. I was wondering if both have
FamilyTreeDNA's Family Finder test, >from their results, could we tell when
their MCRA lived?

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


DNA Research #DNA Question: Could Family Finder tests tell when MCRA lived? #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

I run a Y-haplotype group for J2b with the value on DYS455 of 8. I found
two persons that were a perfect match with 37 Y-markers. One had a foster
father who was born during WWII. I was wondering if both have
FamilyTreeDNA's Family Finder test, >from their results, could we tell when
their MCRA lived?

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


Announcing IGS Twitter #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its Twitter. This Twitter will keep you up
to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as they are announced
on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially helpful for those who find it
difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English. Follow us on
http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Rose Feldman
IGS webmistress


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Announcing IGS Twitter #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society announces its Twitter. This Twitter will keep you up
to date about databases and websites of genealogical interest as they are announced
on different SIGs and forums, and will be especially helpful for those who find it
difficulty to keep up with SIGs in English. Follow us on
http://www.twitter.com/isragen

Rose Feldman
IGS webmistress


Looking for info about my grandparents #general

Mokihana
 

Hi... I just joined the group and it looks wonderful. I am desperately trying to
find more information about my grandparents and hope someone can help.

This is what I know: My grandfather's name was Charles Friedman, but that was a
name he changed to when he came to the USA. We think there's a possiblity that his
given name was Isaac Tshusinski (sp?). My grandmother's name was Anna Sax (Sachs?).
Both were >from Russia, I think, though there is a possiblity that my grandfather
came >from Poland, near Minsk.

Their ship landed in Galveston. They owned a bakery there until a terrible
hurricane in about 1915 (?) wiped them out. Then they moved to NYC. They had four
children: Esther, Morris, Bella (my mother) and Arthur. Anna had a brother named
Samuel.

I have a great grandfather who was a rabbi but I don't know what his name is though
I have a photo of him.

My grandfather told stories of being imprisoned in a Russian prison, escaping, and
spending a couple of years roaming the countryside dressed as a woman to survive,
but we don't know if those stories are true.

Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated. I really have no idea where
to start my search. I have seen census records confirming the Galveston and NYC
information.

Thank you so much.

Mokihana White


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for info about my grandparents #general

Mokihana
 

Hi... I just joined the group and it looks wonderful. I am desperately trying to
find more information about my grandparents and hope someone can help.

This is what I know: My grandfather's name was Charles Friedman, but that was a
name he changed to when he came to the USA. We think there's a possiblity that his
given name was Isaac Tshusinski (sp?). My grandmother's name was Anna Sax (Sachs?).
Both were >from Russia, I think, though there is a possiblity that my grandfather
came >from Poland, near Minsk.

Their ship landed in Galveston. They owned a bakery there until a terrible
hurricane in about 1915 (?) wiped them out. Then they moved to NYC. They had four
children: Esther, Morris, Bella (my mother) and Arthur. Anna had a brother named
Samuel.

I have a great grandfather who was a rabbi but I don't know what his name is though
I have a photo of him.

My grandfather told stories of being imprisoned in a Russian prison, escaping, and
spending a couple of years roaming the countryside dressed as a woman to survive,
but we don't know if those stories are true.

Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated. I really have no idea where
to start my search. I have seen census records confirming the Galveston and NYC
information.

Thank you so much.

Mokihana White


For-fee Researchers #general

Sharon/Peter Haas <haases2867@...>
 

Dear Genners,

A recent JewishGen blog announced that an INFOFILE was being developed for Genners
interested in finding a for-fee researcher familiar with Jewish genealogical
resources in eastern-Europe. This INFOFILE can now be viewed on
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm, and while it is not an official
JewishGen list of recommendation, Genners might wish to consult it to see what
various SIG members had to say about their experiences with these researchers.
The INFOFILE is based on inputs received >from the Galicia and Austria-Czech SIGs,
but we will be soliciting similar inputs >from other eastern European SIGs too -- as
well as >from you, providing that the researchers’ focus was/is on eastern Europe,
and the experience was within the past 5 years, and was positive..

So, if you’ve had such experiences, particularly with those living in Eastern
Europe, (which is different >from the list of professional researchers at
www.apgen.org), please send me (Peter Haas) an e-mail right now. Don’t worry about
any details at this point. You’ll have time later on.
All I need to know now is that you are a resource.

In the e-mail that I referred to above, please address it to me (Peter Haas) at:
ppeett@hotmail.com , give it a “Subject” (for example, “For-Fee” Researcher), and
remember that initially I don’t need any details, so in the body of the e-mail you
don’t really have to say much of anything. Upon receipt, I will then simply
“click” on “reply,” and attach a short, simple “Questionnaire” and instructions
that will guide you through the rest. Should you have any questions however, please
send me a separate e-mail.

In the meantime, please accept my thanks for reading this, and note that with your
help we can make and improve this INFOFILE into a truly valuable resource.

Peter Haas----Northern California
ppeett@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen For-fee Researchers #general

Sharon/Peter Haas <haases2867@...>
 

Dear Genners,

A recent JewishGen blog announced that an INFOFILE was being developed for Genners
interested in finding a for-fee researcher familiar with Jewish genealogical
resources in eastern-Europe. This INFOFILE can now be viewed on
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm, and while it is not an official
JewishGen list of recommendation, Genners might wish to consult it to see what
various SIG members had to say about their experiences with these researchers.
The INFOFILE is based on inputs received >from the Galicia and Austria-Czech SIGs,
but we will be soliciting similar inputs >from other eastern European SIGs too -- as
well as >from you, providing that the researchers’ focus was/is on eastern Europe,
and the experience was within the past 5 years, and was positive..

So, if you’ve had such experiences, particularly with those living in Eastern
Europe, (which is different >from the list of professional researchers at
www.apgen.org), please send me (Peter Haas) an e-mail right now. Don’t worry about
any details at this point. You’ll have time later on.
All I need to know now is that you are a resource.

In the e-mail that I referred to above, please address it to me (Peter Haas) at:
ppeett@hotmail.com , give it a “Subject” (for example, “For-Fee” Researcher), and
remember that initially I don’t need any details, so in the body of the e-mail you
don’t really have to say much of anything. Upon receipt, I will then simply
“click” on “reply,” and attach a short, simple “Questionnaire” and instructions
that will guide you through the rest. Should you have any questions however, please
send me a separate e-mail.

In the meantime, please accept my thanks for reading this, and note that with your
help we can make and improve this INFOFILE into a truly valuable resource.

Peter Haas----Northern California
ppeett@hotmail.com


Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Willie Alter #austria-czech

irenenuriadaly@...
 

Some time ago I was following up on my father's uncle Willie ALTER whose
last address was in Chur. My father had been searching for him in 1943.
Some of you were very helpful in telling me that Chur was a small town in
Switzerland.
Who Willie Alter is and what happened to him is still a mystery.
I have found Emil ALTER (born 14/5/1881 in Lemberg) who was married to my
grandmother's sister Hilda DEUTSCH (Dolni Kounice) and they lived in Vienna.
I am assuming that Willie was Emil's brother but can find nothing about him.
Hilda Alter was not registered in her own right, so when Emil died in 1927
there is nothing further on the family. I do not know what the families
circumstances were after this and how Willie came to be on the scene.
I have found Fritz Alter on the Shoah database as transported >from France to
Auschwitz, but cannot find his younger brother Gustav Karl Alter.

Can anyone help with suggestions??

Thank you,
Irene Pollock Daly Melbourne Australia

Researching Pollak (Liten Beroun), Deutsch (Dolni Kounice)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Willie Alter #austria-czech

irenenuriadaly@...
 

Some time ago I was following up on my father's uncle Willie ALTER whose
last address was in Chur. My father had been searching for him in 1943.
Some of you were very helpful in telling me that Chur was a small town in
Switzerland.
Who Willie Alter is and what happened to him is still a mystery.
I have found Emil ALTER (born 14/5/1881 in Lemberg) who was married to my
grandmother's sister Hilda DEUTSCH (Dolni Kounice) and they lived in Vienna.
I am assuming that Willie was Emil's brother but can find nothing about him.
Hilda Alter was not registered in her own right, so when Emil died in 1927
there is nothing further on the family. I do not know what the families
circumstances were after this and how Willie came to be on the scene.
I have found Fritz Alter on the Shoah database as transported >from France to
Auschwitz, but cannot find his younger brother Gustav Karl Alter.

Can anyone help with suggestions??

Thank you,
Irene Pollock Daly Melbourne Australia

Researching Pollak (Liten Beroun), Deutsch (Dolni Kounice)