Date   

Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Willie Alter #austria-czech

irenenuriadaly@...
 

Some time ago I was following up on my father's uncle Willie ALTER whose
last address was in Chur. My father had been searching for him in 1943.
Some of you were very helpful in telling me that Chur was a small town in
Switzerland.
Who Willie Alter is and what happened to him is still a mystery.
I have found Emil ALTER (born 14/5/1881 in Lemberg) who was married to my
grandmother's sister Hilda DEUTSCH (Dolni Kounice) and they lived in Vienna.
I am assuming that Willie was Emil's brother but can find nothing about him.
Hilda Alter was not registered in her own right, so when Emil died in 1927
there is nothing further on the family. I do not know what the families
circumstances were after this and how Willie came to be on the scene.
I have found Fritz Alter on the Shoah database as transported >from France to
Auschwitz, but cannot find his younger brother Gustav Karl Alter.

Can anyone help with suggestions??

Thank you,
Irene Pollock Daly Melbourne Australia

Researching Pollak (Liten Beroun), Deutsch (Dolni Kounice)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Willie Alter #austria-czech

irenenuriadaly@...
 

Some time ago I was following up on my father's uncle Willie ALTER whose
last address was in Chur. My father had been searching for him in 1943.
Some of you were very helpful in telling me that Chur was a small town in
Switzerland.
Who Willie Alter is and what happened to him is still a mystery.
I have found Emil ALTER (born 14/5/1881 in Lemberg) who was married to my
grandmother's sister Hilda DEUTSCH (Dolni Kounice) and they lived in Vienna.
I am assuming that Willie was Emil's brother but can find nothing about him.
Hilda Alter was not registered in her own right, so when Emil died in 1927
there is nothing further on the family. I do not know what the families
circumstances were after this and how Willie came to be on the scene.
I have found Fritz Alter on the Shoah database as transported >from France to
Auschwitz, but cannot find his younger brother Gustav Karl Alter.

Can anyone help with suggestions??

Thank you,
Irene Pollock Daly Melbourne Australia

Researching Pollak (Liten Beroun), Deutsch (Dolni Kounice)


Eastern Europe For-Fee Researchers #austria-czech

ppeett@...
 

Fellow Genners,

Many of you may recall that a few weeks ago we initiated a project to solicit inputs, >from fellow SIG-members,
who have had positive experiences dealing with for-fee eastern-Europe genealogists/researchers. The
purpose of this undertaking was simple enough: to provide Genners with a way of obtaining help when they
simply don't have the necessary patience, time, experience, or language skills to make headways on their
own.

We are now pleased to announce that such a list of researchers has been compiled as an INFOFILE and is
now available on http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm . The list represents responses >from
individual Genners who have had favorable experiences dealing with these eastern Europe researchers.
The INFOFILE is not, however, an official JewishGen list of recommendations since JewishGen does not,
independently check on the veracity and completeness of the data. We hope you find the list useful, and
we will endeavor to add entries as they become available >from any and all eastern Europe SIG members.
Additional caveats, and cautions about hiring genealogists can be found on
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/profgen.html.

Peter Haas----Northern California


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Eastern Europe For-Fee Researchers #austria-czech

ppeett@...
 

Fellow Genners,

Many of you may recall that a few weeks ago we initiated a project to solicit inputs, >from fellow SIG-members,
who have had positive experiences dealing with for-fee eastern-Europe genealogists/researchers. The
purpose of this undertaking was simple enough: to provide Genners with a way of obtaining help when they
simply don't have the necessary patience, time, experience, or language skills to make headways on their
own.

We are now pleased to announce that such a list of researchers has been compiled as an INFOFILE and is
now available on http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm . The list represents responses >from
individual Genners who have had favorable experiences dealing with these eastern Europe researchers.
The INFOFILE is not, however, an official JewishGen list of recommendations since JewishGen does not,
independently check on the veracity and completeness of the data. We hope you find the list useful, and
we will endeavor to add entries as they become available >from any and all eastern Europe SIG members.
Additional caveats, and cautions about hiring genealogists can be found on
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/profgen.html.

Peter Haas----Northern California


FEIST - CAHN - FRIEDSAM FAMILIES - ANY CONNECTION? #germany

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear All,
My husband's great-grandmother was Helene (Lena) CAHN FRIEDSAM. She was
born in Bendorf, Germany 1838 and married Isaac FRIEDSAM in 1870. I have
just found out her parents were Naphtali CAHN and Gudula FEIST. Do you
have any connections to CAHN or FEIST?

MODERATOR NOTE: It's important to include location and description of location
with family names, especially common family names like FEIST and CAHN.
For example:
CAHN (Name adopted circa 1820) >from Breckenheim and Wallau - Hesse / Nassau.
(between Frankfurt and Wiesbaden in the modern Land of Hessen)

Best Regards, Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272) Corona, California

CAHN, FRIEDSAM (Coln,Bendorf, Bodendorf Germany, Pittsburgh, PA),
NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany, Baltimore, MD)


German SIG #Germany FEIST - CAHN - FRIEDSAM FAMILIES - ANY CONNECTION? #germany

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear All,
My husband's great-grandmother was Helene (Lena) CAHN FRIEDSAM. She was
born in Bendorf, Germany 1838 and married Isaac FRIEDSAM in 1870. I have
just found out her parents were Naphtali CAHN and Gudula FEIST. Do you
have any connections to CAHN or FEIST?

MODERATOR NOTE: It's important to include location and description of location
with family names, especially common family names like FEIST and CAHN.
For example:
CAHN (Name adopted circa 1820) >from Breckenheim and Wallau - Hesse / Nassau.
(between Frankfurt and Wiesbaden in the modern Land of Hessen)

Best Regards, Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272) Corona, California

CAHN, FRIEDSAM (Coln,Bendorf, Bodendorf Germany, Pittsburgh, PA),
NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany, Baltimore, MD)


Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of JewishGen's
Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit these
stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen -- the kinds of
success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen mailing lists and
discussion groups. This issue highlights the international scope of JewishGen with
contributors >from the UK, Poland, Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered the
synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-great-
grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony celebrating the
renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by posting it
on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen Family Finder to find the
grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the photo, and then traveled to Israel for a
joyful meeting with this newly discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an Austrian JewishGenner
a photo of the tombstone that answered some questions and posed new mysteries, and
followed the trail that ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously
unknown living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group just last
month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found a living cousin in
Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact with the part of the family that
remained in Ukraine. We republish her account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to send
Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future publication (their
email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of JewishGen's
Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit these
stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen -- the kinds of
success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen mailing lists and
discussion groups. This issue highlights the international scope of JewishGen with
contributors >from the UK, Poland, Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered the
synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-great-
grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony celebrating the
renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by posting it
on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen Family Finder to find the
grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the photo, and then traveled to Israel for a
joyful meeting with this newly discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an Austrian JewishGenner
a photo of the tombstone that answered some questions and posed new mysteries, and
followed the trail that ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously
unknown living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group just last
month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found a living cousin in
Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact with the part of the family that
remained in Ukraine. We republish her account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to send
Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future publication (their
email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


Krasilov ShtetLinks web site #general

Barry E Chernick
 

The Krasilov, Ukraine ShtetLinks web site was updated yesterday.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Krasilov/index.html If you have any information
about your family connections to Krasilov please let me know. We are always trying to
grow the site and preserve the history of our ancestors and the place they lived.
Barry Chernick


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Krasilov ShtetLinks web site #general

Barry E Chernick
 

The Krasilov, Ukraine ShtetLinks web site was updated yesterday.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Krasilov/index.html If you have any information
about your family connections to Krasilov please let me know. We are always trying to
grow the site and preserve the history of our ancestors and the place they lived.
Barry Chernick


Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #germany

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, FL, VP, Education, JewishGen phylliskramer1@att.net


German SIG #Germany Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #germany

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, FL, VP, Education, JewishGen phylliskramer1@att.net


Translation Request (Yiddish) - Letter to my Grandmother - 1915 #belarus

smoody61@...
 

Hello,
I have a two-page letter that I'd like to have translated from
Yiddish to English.

This letter was sent to my paternal grandmother Rose
EINBUND in Pittsburgh in 1915. I believe it's >from her
brother Zacharia in Saint Louis. My grandmother came to the US
from Russia in 1913. Her brother followed in 1914.
The letter) is posted on Viewmate. ( VM 15461 )
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15461

Thanks again for all of the great help!!

James WEINER
Los Angeles, California - USA
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Translation Request (Yiddish) - Letter to my Grandmother - 1915 #belarus

smoody61@...
 

Hello,
I have a two-page letter that I'd like to have translated from
Yiddish to English.

This letter was sent to my paternal grandmother Rose
EINBUND in Pittsburgh in 1915. I believe it's >from her
brother Zacharia in Saint Louis. My grandmother came to the US
from Russia in 1913. Her brother followed in 1914.
The letter) is posted on Viewmate. ( VM 15461 )
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15461

Thanks again for all of the great help!!

James WEINER
Los Angeles, California - USA
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Searching: SHUBOVSKI/SHIBOWSKI from Mosty #belarus

Danielle Weiner
 

I have recently found a marriage record that indicates a marriage
between Abel ben Movsha Nosel Shibowski and Miss Khaia bat Iankel
Vainerovich. The groom is stated to be >from Mosty, Grodno gubernia
(now in Belarus); the bride >from Butrimonys (now in Lithuania). The
wedding was recorded in the city of Vilna in 1896.

I believe the bride to be the sister of my grandfather, Daniel Vainerovich.

Does anyone out there have knowledge of the SHUBOVSKI (spelled various
ways) family >from Mosty?

I spoke today with a woman whose grandfather, Meyer, was >from Mosty
and probably would have been close in age to Abel (brothers,
possibly?), but she knows only that he died at an early age leaving
behind wife Dora (nee Kaplan) and three young children - Bessie, Mary
and Samuel. Dora and her children immigrated to the US around the
turn of the century.

I hope these names ring a bell for someone.

Thank you,
Danielle Weiner
Dallas, TX
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information.

Searching for: SHUBOVSKI - Mosty, Belarus & Vilna, Lithuania;
VAINEROVICH - Vilna & Butrimonys, Lithuania; GELER - Rudamina & Vilna,
Lithuania


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: SHUBOVSKI/SHIBOWSKI from Mosty #belarus

Danielle Weiner
 

I have recently found a marriage record that indicates a marriage
between Abel ben Movsha Nosel Shibowski and Miss Khaia bat Iankel
Vainerovich. The groom is stated to be >from Mosty, Grodno gubernia
(now in Belarus); the bride >from Butrimonys (now in Lithuania). The
wedding was recorded in the city of Vilna in 1896.

I believe the bride to be the sister of my grandfather, Daniel Vainerovich.

Does anyone out there have knowledge of the SHUBOVSKI (spelled various
ways) family >from Mosty?

I spoke today with a woman whose grandfather, Meyer, was >from Mosty
and probably would have been close in age to Abel (brothers,
possibly?), but she knows only that he died at an early age leaving
behind wife Dora (nee Kaplan) and three young children - Bessie, Mary
and Samuel. Dora and her children immigrated to the US around the
turn of the century.

I hope these names ring a bell for someone.

Thank you,
Danielle Weiner
Dallas, TX
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information.

Searching for: SHUBOVSKI - Mosty, Belarus & Vilna, Lithuania;
VAINEROVICH - Vilna & Butrimonys, Lithuania; GELER - Rudamina & Vilna,
Lithuania


Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #france

bounce-2035148-772957@...
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen


French SIG #France Latest Issue of Success! Stories is Posted on JewishGen #france

bounce-2035148-772957@...
 

We're pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's Success! Stories webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

Meredith Hoffman and Nancy Siegel have worked with the authors to edit
these stories of ancestor and family connections made through JewishGen --
the kinds of success stories we regularly read about on the JewishGen
mailing lists and discussion groups. This issue highlights the
international scope of JewishGen with contributors >from the UK, Poland,
Brazil, Canada, and the US.

Martin Cahn traced one line of his family back six generations, discovered
the synagogue built in 1836 due to the efforts of his great-great-great-
great-grandfather and, as a guest of honor, attended the ceremony
celebrating the renovation of the synagogue building.

Eliana Aizim learned the identity of family members in an old photo by
posting it on ViewMate, followed these leads through the JewishGen
Family Finder to find the grandson of her great-aunt pictured in the
photo, and then traveled to Israel for a joyful meeting with this newly
discovered branch of the family.

Karen Sanders found the names of her maternal great-grandparents on the
JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry - Austria, received >from an
Austrian JewishGenner a photo of the tombstone that answered some
questions and posed new mysteries, and followed the trail that
ultimately revealed her family's origins and a previously unknown
living family member who had survived the war in a Siberian prison camp.

Debbie Rose posted her success story to the JewishGen Discussion Group
just last month. With the help of many Israeli JewishGenners, she found
a living cousin in Israel, 65 years after her family lost all contact
with the part of the family that remained in Ukraine. We republish her
account in Heard on the Lists.

We're sure you'll be inspired by these stories and we encourage you to
send Meredith and Nancy your own success stories for possible future
publication (their email address is success@lyris.jewishgen.org).
--
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen