Date   

Re: What and where is "Schavoli" in Lithuania ? #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

The closest by sound to Schavoli is the name of Lithuanian town Shaulyaj.
Leonid Pereplyotchik.

--- On Thu, 5/20/10, Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@gmail.com> wrote:
On a France born cousin's birth certificate, her father's place of
birth is "Schavoli", in Lithuania. It appears to be a wrong
spelling ... Does anybody knows the right spelling of
that town ?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What and where is "Schavoli" in Lithuania ? #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

The closest by sound to Schavoli is the name of Lithuanian town Shaulyaj.
Leonid Pereplyotchik.

--- On Thu, 5/20/10, Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@gmail.com> wrote:
On a France born cousin's birth certificate, her father's place of
birth is "Schavoli", in Lithuania. It appears to be a wrong
spelling ... Does anybody knows the right spelling of
that town ?


Re: Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK #general

Peter Lebensold
 

In the case of my own family (as I have explained before in this forum), it
seems clear that my great-uncle, born a SZAFIR in Poland, and arrived in the
UK around 1907, took the name Joseph Leon WERNER at some point prior to his
May 1913 "Application for a Certificate of Naturalization" in Glasgow.

The Application not only makes no mention of any previous name, but also
(it seems clear) ** retroactively ** changes the last names of his parents
from SZAFIR to WERNER! (I have JRI-Poland records of a marriage between
two Szafirs with the same first names as Joseph's parents, in his home town,
but no Werners.)

Who, after all, in 1913 was going to check the records of a small town in Poland?

Peter Lebensold
Toronto
__
From: Harvey Kaplan <rvlkaplan@googlemail.com>
And I've just been looking at a naturalisation file for Solomon
WOLFSON, which makes no mention of the surname he had in Poland.


Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK- a legal requirement #general

Nick Rich
 

Just to throw my two pence worth into this subject, I have managed to
collect quite a few naturalisation papers for various ancestors who
naturalized in England, ranging >from the 1880's up until the 1920's, and the
level of information provided varies widely >from town to town. One's I have
for major cities, London and Birmingham tend to be more scant, and not all
of the boxes have always been filled in, and not always do they show the
family name in the old country. However, I have one document which was
completed in Bradford which has an amazing amount of information, and some
very lengthy references revealing all sorts of goodies including how much
money they declared as having in the bank, what was the financial turnover
of their business, what addresses they previously resided at, what other
family they had who did not live in England, which of course to a
genealogist is fantastic to have. I guess my point is that although there
was just one process, it doesn't necessarily follow that you should expect
the same result on all papers, and this may depend on who was filling in the
form, who was requesting the information, how much experience that person
requesting the information had with naturalisations, and quite possible how
many they had to deal with.

We all now live in an electronic age where generally processes tend to be
the same, or at least capture the same information. We are talking about an
age when the documents were handwritten, by various levels of intelligence
and knowledge of the process, and with varying amounts of time to complete
this. Therefore we should expect to see some variation in the end result.

Kind regards,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching - RYDZ, JELENKIEWICZ, EJMAN (Konin & Slesin), BLUMBERG (Riga)


Footnote #general

Marianne Tobin <martobin@...>
 

Does any one use Footnote, and is it a good site.

Thanks
Marianne Tobin

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK #general

Peter Lebensold
 

In the case of my own family (as I have explained before in this forum), it
seems clear that my great-uncle, born a SZAFIR in Poland, and arrived in the
UK around 1907, took the name Joseph Leon WERNER at some point prior to his
May 1913 "Application for a Certificate of Naturalization" in Glasgow.

The Application not only makes no mention of any previous name, but also
(it seems clear) ** retroactively ** changes the last names of his parents
from SZAFIR to WERNER! (I have JRI-Poland records of a marriage between
two Szafirs with the same first names as Joseph's parents, in his home town,
but no Werners.)

Who, after all, in 1913 was going to check the records of a small town in Poland?

Peter Lebensold
Toronto
__
From: Harvey Kaplan <rvlkaplan@googlemail.com>
And I've just been looking at a naturalisation file for Solomon
WOLFSON, which makes no mention of the surname he had in Poland.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK- a legal requirement #general

Nick Rich
 

Just to throw my two pence worth into this subject, I have managed to
collect quite a few naturalisation papers for various ancestors who
naturalized in England, ranging >from the 1880's up until the 1920's, and the
level of information provided varies widely >from town to town. One's I have
for major cities, London and Birmingham tend to be more scant, and not all
of the boxes have always been filled in, and not always do they show the
family name in the old country. However, I have one document which was
completed in Bradford which has an amazing amount of information, and some
very lengthy references revealing all sorts of goodies including how much
money they declared as having in the bank, what was the financial turnover
of their business, what addresses they previously resided at, what other
family they had who did not live in England, which of course to a
genealogist is fantastic to have. I guess my point is that although there
was just one process, it doesn't necessarily follow that you should expect
the same result on all papers, and this may depend on who was filling in the
form, who was requesting the information, how much experience that person
requesting the information had with naturalisations, and quite possible how
many they had to deal with.

We all now live in an electronic age where generally processes tend to be
the same, or at least capture the same information. We are talking about an
age when the documents were handwritten, by various levels of intelligence
and knowledge of the process, and with varying amounts of time to complete
this. Therefore we should expect to see some variation in the end result.

Kind regards,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching - RYDZ, JELENKIEWICZ, EJMAN (Konin & Slesin), BLUMBERG (Riga)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Footnote #general

Marianne Tobin <martobin@...>
 

Does any one use Footnote, and is it a good site.

Thanks
Marianne Tobin

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbonim in Budapest (STEIF, SCHUECK) #rabbinic

shimonsporn
 

Please look at this picture. Do you recognise any of them?
Harav Yonoson Steif is first on right, then Rabbi Nosson Schueck (Shick?)

http://resources.ushmm.org/inquery/uia_doc.php/photos/2979?hr=null

Are any of them >from the Sofer family? As I recall, didn't some of the
sons of Harav Chaim Sofer Z"L "Machne Chaim" (Muncacz/Budapest) also
become a Rov in Budapest after him?
Could the older one in the middle be a Sofer?

Kal Tuv!

Shimon Sporn
Ramat Bet Shemesh
Looking for SOFER, SZOFER, SCHRIEBER, SCHREIBER


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbonim in Budapest (STEIF, SCHUECK) #rabbinic

shimonsporn
 

Please look at this picture. Do you recognise any of them?
Harav Yonoson Steif is first on right, then Rabbi Nosson Schueck (Shick?)

http://resources.ushmm.org/inquery/uia_doc.php/photos/2979?hr=null

Are any of them >from the Sofer family? As I recall, didn't some of the
sons of Harav Chaim Sofer Z"L "Machne Chaim" (Muncacz/Budapest) also
become a Rov in Budapest after him?
Could the older one in the middle be a Sofer?

Kal Tuv!

Shimon Sporn
Ramat Bet Shemesh
Looking for SOFER, SZOFER, SCHRIEBER, SCHREIBER


R' Arieh Leib Parnes of Galicia? #rabbinic

panthersfan27@...
 

Hi,

I am wondering if someone who has access to Meorei Galicia by Meir
Wunder could tell me what his book says about R' Arieh Leib Parnes? I
don't have a page number, unfortunately, nor a volume number, but a
search on Google Books says that his name is mentioned in there.

I really appreciate any help that you can provide me. This is
cross-posted on the GaliciaSIG and the RavSIG.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Sarasota, FL

Researching: PARNES, BRIEF, ZIMET, KATZ (Galicia)


ROSENBAUM descendants of R' Naftali KATZ-author of "The Smichas Chachomim" #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

There is a theory that one of my ancestors' family name was ROSENBAUM
and later changed (to SCHECHTER)). This family lineage stems >from R'
Naftali KATZ, author of the "Smichas Chachomim". Anyone "out there" a
ROSENBAUM and also stems >from R' Naftali so we can share possible
cnnections.

Thank you and Chag Shavuot Sameach-Happy Shavuot.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Arieh Leib Parnes of Galicia? #rabbinic

panthersfan27@...
 

Hi,

I am wondering if someone who has access to Meorei Galicia by Meir
Wunder could tell me what his book says about R' Arieh Leib Parnes? I
don't have a page number, unfortunately, nor a volume number, but a
search on Google Books says that his name is mentioned in there.

I really appreciate any help that you can provide me. This is
cross-posted on the GaliciaSIG and the RavSIG.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Sarasota, FL

Researching: PARNES, BRIEF, ZIMET, KATZ (Galicia)


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic ROSENBAUM descendants of R' Naftali KATZ-author of "The Smichas Chachomim" #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

There is a theory that one of my ancestors' family name was ROSENBAUM
and later changed (to SCHECHTER)). This family lineage stems >from R'
Naftali KATZ, author of the "Smichas Chachomim". Anyone "out there" a
ROSENBAUM and also stems >from R' Naftali so we can share possible
cnnections.

Thank you and Chag Shavuot Sameach-Happy Shavuot.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Corrections to the Muizenberg article of 14 May 2010 #southafrica

hedy davis <hedy.davis@...>
 

The article, mentioned in a recent message to the SA SIG, is titled
'Memories of Muizenberg', the official title of the comprehensive Exhibition
being held, not at the Albow Center as is mistakenly stated, but at the
Jewish Museum in the Gardens, Cape Town, until 11 June 2010. Thereafter
it will transfer to the RHCC, at the Great Park Synagogue, Johannesburg
during August. A short Youtube presentation composed of views of the
Exhibition and interviews, may be seen by visiting -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQrlMZ6eTBw

As the Chief Researcher, Historian and compiler of the text for the
Exhibition, I would like to correct a few other misconceptions in the
article, especially since it used the 'Memories of Muizenberg' title.
To suggest that this unique village by the seaside has been "usurped in
the affections of many by more modern and discerning destinations such
as Cape Point and Simonstown" ignores what has been the attraction of
Muizenberg to generations of Jews. Despite changes in fortune, the
Muizenberg community survives, and during the "Season", holiday makers
still flock to the tiny Synagogue which is bursting to capacity, as
for several weeks between 400 and 500 country members throng there to
experience the "Ruach" that pervades its walls.

The article mistakenly refers to Rabbi Isaac Jacob Frank (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/safrica/rabbis&cantors/frank_ij/index.htm),
who was never Rabbi to the community of the Muizenberg Synagogue,
although he performed many and varied services. In the article cited,
the author, Basil Frank of Jerusalem, errs in claiming that his
grandfather was "Rav and Chasan of the Muizenberg Synagogue for fifty
years."

In 1924 Rev E S Walt was appointed to act as Rabbi to the community
and at the same time Rev I J Frank, who spoke no English, was
appointed Baal Teffilah and Schochet. When the need arose, Rev Frank
also performed the services of the Chasan. He served the community
faithfully till he passed away at the age of 87 in 1965, a noble
period of 40 years. In the intervening years many clergymen,
including several Rabbis, ministered to the community. The longest
serving of these was Rabbi Dr J Weinberg >from 1948 - 1961.

For those ex-Muizenbergers or friends of Muizenberg who may have
missed the opportunity to be included in the Exhibition, I am
presently writing the book, tentatively titled, "The Shtetl by the
Sea", and I would love to hear >from them and to receive further
memoirs or photographs of historic interest.

from Hedy I Davis, hedy.davis@gmail.com


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Corrections to the Muizenberg article of 14 May 2010 #southafrica

hedy davis <hedy.davis@...>
 

The article, mentioned in a recent message to the SA SIG, is titled
'Memories of Muizenberg', the official title of the comprehensive Exhibition
being held, not at the Albow Center as is mistakenly stated, but at the
Jewish Museum in the Gardens, Cape Town, until 11 June 2010. Thereafter
it will transfer to the RHCC, at the Great Park Synagogue, Johannesburg
during August. A short Youtube presentation composed of views of the
Exhibition and interviews, may be seen by visiting -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQrlMZ6eTBw

As the Chief Researcher, Historian and compiler of the text for the
Exhibition, I would like to correct a few other misconceptions in the
article, especially since it used the 'Memories of Muizenberg' title.
To suggest that this unique village by the seaside has been "usurped in
the affections of many by more modern and discerning destinations such
as Cape Point and Simonstown" ignores what has been the attraction of
Muizenberg to generations of Jews. Despite changes in fortune, the
Muizenberg community survives, and during the "Season", holiday makers
still flock to the tiny Synagogue which is bursting to capacity, as
for several weeks between 400 and 500 country members throng there to
experience the "Ruach" that pervades its walls.

The article mistakenly refers to Rabbi Isaac Jacob Frank (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/safrica/rabbis&cantors/frank_ij/index.htm),
who was never Rabbi to the community of the Muizenberg Synagogue,
although he performed many and varied services. In the article cited,
the author, Basil Frank of Jerusalem, errs in claiming that his
grandfather was "Rav and Chasan of the Muizenberg Synagogue for fifty
years."

In 1924 Rev E S Walt was appointed to act as Rabbi to the community
and at the same time Rev I J Frank, who spoke no English, was
appointed Baal Teffilah and Schochet. When the need arose, Rev Frank
also performed the services of the Chasan. He served the community
faithfully till he passed away at the age of 87 in 1965, a noble
period of 40 years. In the intervening years many clergymen,
including several Rabbis, ministered to the community. The longest
serving of these was Rabbi Dr J Weinberg >from 1948 - 1961.

For those ex-Muizenbergers or friends of Muizenberg who may have
missed the opportunity to be included in the Exhibition, I am
presently writing the book, tentatively titled, "The Shtetl by the
Sea", and I would love to hear >from them and to receive further
memoirs or photographs of historic interest.

from Hedy I Davis, hedy.davis@gmail.com


JewishGen Hungarian Database Update - Miskolc & Gary_Deutsch #general

samara99@...
 

We are pleased to announce an update to the JewishGen Hungarian Database.
We have added approximately 14,000 new birth, marriage and death records.

What is more significant is that this update completes the transcription
of all Miskolc vital records available >from the Hungarian National archives
and filmed by the Family History Library of the Mormons.

There are now approximately 36,000 birth, marriage and death records for
Miskolc in the database.

This is due primarily to the efforts and tremendous persistence of Gary
Deutsch, who has worked on these records over a period of five or more
years. Gary has both led a team of volunteers to accomplish this
undertaking, while also transcribing the majority of these records himself.

The volunteers assisting Gary with the most recent records are András
Hirschler, Moshe Lorber and Zvika Oren. A number of other volunteers
assisted with the previous records, already in the database.

We are all grateful to Gary and his team for this major accomplishment.
This is a tremendous contribution to Hungarian-Jewish genealogy.

There are now over 280,000 vital records and over 800,000 total records
in the JewishGen Hungarian Database.
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

Sam Schleman
Project Coordinator
Hungarian Vital Records Project
Samara99@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JewishGen Hungarian Database Update - Miskolc & Gary_Deutsch #general

samara99@...
 

We are pleased to announce an update to the JewishGen Hungarian Database.
We have added approximately 14,000 new birth, marriage and death records.

What is more significant is that this update completes the transcription
of all Miskolc vital records available >from the Hungarian National archives
and filmed by the Family History Library of the Mormons.

There are now approximately 36,000 birth, marriage and death records for
Miskolc in the database.

This is due primarily to the efforts and tremendous persistence of Gary
Deutsch, who has worked on these records over a period of five or more
years. Gary has both led a team of volunteers to accomplish this
undertaking, while also transcribing the majority of these records himself.

The volunteers assisting Gary with the most recent records are András
Hirschler, Moshe Lorber and Zvika Oren. A number of other volunteers
assisted with the previous records, already in the database.

We are all grateful to Gary and his team for this major accomplishment.
This is a tremendous contribution to Hungarian-Jewish genealogy.

There are now over 280,000 vital records and over 800,000 total records
in the JewishGen Hungarian Database.
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

Sam Schleman
Project Coordinator
Hungarian Vital Records Project
Samara99@verizon.net


Re: Strategies for viewing and translating microfilm #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Hi, Bill,

I think you mean microfilm, not microfiche.

Let me tell you how I found my TALALAI on the seven microfilmed rolls of Mogilev
(Belarus) Crown Rabbinate Records, and I think this will work for nearly anyone
that is linguistically-challenged.

When I began this, I couldn't read Russian and had all these rolls to go through.
I could recognize the Yiddish/Hebrew forms, but the handwriting on that side was
worse than the Cyrillic, and the information on both sides does not always match.
Sometimes there is more data on the Cyrillic side, such as the mother's or
bride's maiden name, which is very important information.

I had a few new Russian immigrant friends, but everyone was working or at school
and didn't have time to schlep to the library with me, so I had them
write my names of interest in various forms: printed, cursive, perfect
handwriting and scribbled forms. I enlarged them on a copier and cut and pasted
until I had a good "cheat sheet." I soon learned to recognize TALALAI, RATNER,
IASIN and the rest.

TALALAI in Cyrillic looks somewhat like "meowmeow," or that's how I thought of it.
Those who know Cyrillic know what I mean. I found nearly 98% of the TALALAI in the
seven rolls. When my friends asked me how I did that (there were a few that
weren't right), I said I just looked for the cats.

It was the same for the rest. Once I realized what the various forms of the name
could look like, it got much easier, and I could scan down the microfilmed pages
and get them nearly all right.

As for the Hebrew/Yiddish, do the same and ask your fluent friends to write your
names of interest in various formats: good handwriting, scribbled, printed and
cursive. I would ask several different people to do this and create a sheet with
the various forms of each name. This will really help you.

If you are stuck on some records, use your handy-dandy digital camera to capture
the entry and show it to someone. Check with one of the local rabbis or the Jewish
Family Service in Providence to see if there are Russian-fluent families to ask.

The various columns are easy to understand. You might also need a list of the
months in Hebrew and in Cyrillic to make sure you get dates right.

Good luck!

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog
http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com
dardasht1@yahoo.com
---

From: Bill Saslow <bigbear011@cox.net>
I just ordered 6 rolls of Microfiche on the Town of Uman, Russia
Jewish Birth Records 1866-1919 and they are in Russian and Hebrew.
They should arrive at a Family History Center (Mormons) in Rhode
Island in 3-5 weeks. Speaking and reading no Russian, and little
Hebrew since my Bar Mitzvah, I'm trying to think about how to approach
viewing the images when they arrive. Any ideas out there?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Strategies for viewing and translating microfilm #general

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Hi, Bill,

I think you mean microfilm, not microfiche.

Let me tell you how I found my TALALAI on the seven microfilmed rolls of Mogilev
(Belarus) Crown Rabbinate Records, and I think this will work for nearly anyone
that is linguistically-challenged.

When I began this, I couldn't read Russian and had all these rolls to go through.
I could recognize the Yiddish/Hebrew forms, but the handwriting on that side was
worse than the Cyrillic, and the information on both sides does not always match.
Sometimes there is more data on the Cyrillic side, such as the mother's or
bride's maiden name, which is very important information.

I had a few new Russian immigrant friends, but everyone was working or at school
and didn't have time to schlep to the library with me, so I had them
write my names of interest in various forms: printed, cursive, perfect
handwriting and scribbled forms. I enlarged them on a copier and cut and pasted
until I had a good "cheat sheet." I soon learned to recognize TALALAI, RATNER,
IASIN and the rest.

TALALAI in Cyrillic looks somewhat like "meowmeow," or that's how I thought of it.
Those who know Cyrillic know what I mean. I found nearly 98% of the TALALAI in the
seven rolls. When my friends asked me how I did that (there were a few that
weren't right), I said I just looked for the cats.

It was the same for the rest. Once I realized what the various forms of the name
could look like, it got much easier, and I could scan down the microfilmed pages
and get them nearly all right.

As for the Hebrew/Yiddish, do the same and ask your fluent friends to write your
names of interest in various formats: good handwriting, scribbled, printed and
cursive. I would ask several different people to do this and create a sheet with
the various forms of each name. This will really help you.

If you are stuck on some records, use your handy-dandy digital camera to capture
the entry and show it to someone. Check with one of the local rabbis or the Jewish
Family Service in Providence to see if there are Russian-fluent families to ask.

The various columns are easy to understand. You might also need a list of the
months in Hebrew and in Cyrillic to make sure you get dates right.

Good luck!

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog
http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com
dardasht1@yahoo.com
---

From: Bill Saslow <bigbear011@cox.net>
I just ordered 6 rolls of Microfiche on the Town of Uman, Russia
Jewish Birth Records 1866-1919 and they are in Russian and Hebrew.
They should arrive at a Family History Center (Mormons) in Rhode
Island in 3-5 weeks. Speaking and reading no Russian, and little
Hebrew since my Bar Mitzvah, I'm trying to think about how to approach
viewing the images when they arrive. Any ideas out there?