Date   

News from the Israel Genealogical Society #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 -- November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55 or
http://www.isragen.org.il/upload/infocenter/info_images/24032010151725@Call-Papers2010-E.pdf

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y or
http://www.isragen.org.il/upload/infocenter/info_images/14112009205136@2010membershipDues-E.pdf

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland News from the Israel Genealogical Society #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 -- November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55 or
http://www.isragen.org.il/upload/infocenter/info_images/24032010151725@Call-Papers2010-E.pdf

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y or
http://www.isragen.org.il/upload/infocenter/info_images/14112009205136@2010membershipDues-E.pdf

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Evelyn Filippi
 

Celia
Its endless the help you gave me, the Golden ducks,
The head stones and all the
buried information that you found and uncovered.
You are amazing and the bestest and I am glad you are back.
I love you
Evelyne Filippi
New YOrk


LEIMDORFER from Budapest #austria-czech

oliverbryk@...
 

I am looking for information about Jakob LEIMDORFER (O Umlaut) and his wife,
born Julia ENGEL. Their son Aladar, born in Budapest in 1888, married my
relative Ella BRYK, born in Vienna.

Oliver Bryk (San Francisco)


Re: identifying ancestors' records on microfiche #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

Bill Saslow wrote:
I just ordered 6 rolls of Microfiche on the Town of Uman, Russia Jewish
Birth Records 1866-1919 and they are in Russian and Hebrew. They should
arrive at a Family History Center (Mormons) in Rhode
Island in 3-5 weeks. Speaking and reading no Russian, and little Hebrew
since my Bar Mitzvah, I'm trying to think about how to approach viewing
the images when they arrive.
---
The index pages that follow each of the actual, individual birth,
marriage or death records should be in Polish (Roman characters) and
will give you the actual document (AKT) number of each record. I suggest
that while you're at the family history library you do the following:

1. Starting at the beginning of the reel locate the first *face sheet*
listing (in Polish) which will show the microfilm number (e.g., Mikrofilm
Nr. xxxxx), name of the town (e.g., Karszewa), types of vital records
(e.g., birth and marriage), number of records, and range of dates.

I strongly recommend printing this page for future reference!

2. Scroll forward until you reach the first index page listing the
names/surnames of your ancestors. (Please note: The index page always
appears *after* not before the individual records.)

3. On a sheet of paper, jot down the AKT numbers and names shown on the
index page, then

4. Roll back the microfiche until you locate the first of your ancestor's
vital record and send to the printer.

Now scroll forward until you locate the next index page.

Repeat steps #2 - 4.

Be sure to identify each of the vital records by writing in the margin
(or on the back of each record) the FHL microfiche number shown on the
microfiche box, the document (AKT) number, type of vital record (birth,
marriage or death), and the names of your ancestors. This might seem
tedious but it saves you >from having to identify each record later on,
especially if you don't know the language (in this case, Russian).

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

Researching:
DROZDIASZ/DROSDASH/RAUS/ROSE: Preston, England, UK; Karczew, Poland
ISAACS, Solomon and Sarah: Birmingham, England; Poland (near Warsaw)
KUJAWSKI: Lodz, Poland
SUMMERS and WINTER: Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Lodz/Kalisz, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants of that name): Karczew, Poland


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Celia #austria-czech

Evelyn Filippi
 

Celia
Its endless the help you gave me, the Golden ducks,
The head stones and all the
buried information that you found and uncovered.
You are amazing and the bestest and I am glad you are back.
I love you
Evelyne Filippi
New YOrk


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech LEIMDORFER from Budapest #austria-czech

oliverbryk@...
 

I am looking for information about Jakob LEIMDORFER (O Umlaut) and his wife,
born Julia ENGEL. Their son Aladar, born in Budapest in 1888, married my
relative Ella BRYK, born in Vienna.

Oliver Bryk (San Francisco)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: identifying ancestors' records on microfiche #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

Bill Saslow wrote:
I just ordered 6 rolls of Microfiche on the Town of Uman, Russia Jewish
Birth Records 1866-1919 and they are in Russian and Hebrew. They should
arrive at a Family History Center (Mormons) in Rhode
Island in 3-5 weeks. Speaking and reading no Russian, and little Hebrew
since my Bar Mitzvah, I'm trying to think about how to approach viewing
the images when they arrive.
---
The index pages that follow each of the actual, individual birth,
marriage or death records should be in Polish (Roman characters) and
will give you the actual document (AKT) number of each record. I suggest
that while you're at the family history library you do the following:

1. Starting at the beginning of the reel locate the first *face sheet*
listing (in Polish) which will show the microfilm number (e.g., Mikrofilm
Nr. xxxxx), name of the town (e.g., Karszewa), types of vital records
(e.g., birth and marriage), number of records, and range of dates.

I strongly recommend printing this page for future reference!

2. Scroll forward until you reach the first index page listing the
names/surnames of your ancestors. (Please note: The index page always
appears *after* not before the individual records.)

3. On a sheet of paper, jot down the AKT numbers and names shown on the
index page, then

4. Roll back the microfiche until you locate the first of your ancestor's
vital record and send to the printer.

Now scroll forward until you locate the next index page.

Repeat steps #2 - 4.

Be sure to identify each of the vital records by writing in the margin
(or on the back of each record) the FHL microfiche number shown on the
microfiche box, the document (AKT) number, type of vital record (birth,
marriage or death), and the names of your ancestors. This might seem
tedious but it saves you >from having to identify each record later on,
especially if you don't know the language (in this case, Russian).

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

Researching:
DROZDIASZ/DROSDASH/RAUS/ROSE: Preston, England, UK; Karczew, Poland
ISAACS, Solomon and Sarah: Birmingham, England; Poland (near Warsaw)
KUJAWSKI: Lodz, Poland
SUMMERS and WINTER: Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Lodz/Kalisz, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants of that name): Karczew, Poland


Aschermann Prague -- Cafe #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

I don't know to what extent it might be interesting for Ms. Mitchell's search. There was a "Kaffee-
Restaurant Aschermann" in Prague, which was an important meeting place for Prague Jews in the 1930's
and especially during the Nazi occupation.

It was located in Prague I., house conscription number 731, which is now Dlouha 33 (Lange Gasse 33). So, it
shared premises with important institutions of Prague's Jewish Cultural Community (Juedische
Kultusgemeinde -- Zidovska Nabozenska Obec) including the Labor Office, the Palestine Office the Keren
Kajemet and Keren Hajesod foundations and other important Zionist organizations.

One can see frequent advertisements for Cafe Aschermann on the last pages of the early editions of the
Juedisches Nachrichtenblatt/Zidovske listy, which are available online at:
http://deposit.d-nb.de/online/jued/jued.htm

The manager was one Armin Rado, who was apparently murdered at Sobibor-Ossowa in May 1942
(Transport Ax >from Terezin on 9 May 1942).

Rick Pinard
Prague


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Aschermann Prague -- Cafe #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

I don't know to what extent it might be interesting for Ms. Mitchell's search. There was a "Kaffee-
Restaurant Aschermann" in Prague, which was an important meeting place for Prague Jews in the 1930's
and especially during the Nazi occupation.

It was located in Prague I., house conscription number 731, which is now Dlouha 33 (Lange Gasse 33). So, it
shared premises with important institutions of Prague's Jewish Cultural Community (Juedische
Kultusgemeinde -- Zidovska Nabozenska Obec) including the Labor Office, the Palestine Office the Keren
Kajemet and Keren Hajesod foundations and other important Zionist organizations.

One can see frequent advertisements for Cafe Aschermann on the last pages of the early editions of the
Juedisches Nachrichtenblatt/Zidovske listy, which are available online at:
http://deposit.d-nb.de/online/jued/jued.htm

The manager was one Armin Rado, who was apparently murdered at Sobibor-Ossowa in May 1942
(Transport Ax >from Terezin on 9 May 1942).

Rick Pinard
Prague


suzybct@...
 

Dear Celia,
We are delighted to see that you are posting again. Your absence was
definitely felt by all of us for whom your generosity and joyfulness
have made the exploration of our connections to each other a wonderful
and adventurous game.
Fondly,
Suzy Boehm


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Celia #austria-czech

suzybct@...
 

Dear Celia,
We are delighted to see that you are posting again. Your absence was
definitely felt by all of us for whom your generosity and joyfulness
have made the exploration of our connections to each other a wonderful
and adventurous game.
Fondly,
Suzy Boehm


Re: What and where is "Schavoli" in Lithuania ? #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

The closest by sound to Schavoli is the name of Lithuanian town Shaulyaj.
Leonid Pereplyotchik.

--- On Thu, 5/20/10, Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@gmail.com> wrote:
On a France born cousin's birth certificate, her father's place of
birth is "Schavoli", in Lithuania. It appears to be a wrong
spelling ... Does anybody knows the right spelling of
that town ?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What and where is "Schavoli" in Lithuania ? #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

The closest by sound to Schavoli is the name of Lithuanian town Shaulyaj.
Leonid Pereplyotchik.

--- On Thu, 5/20/10, Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@gmail.com> wrote:
On a France born cousin's birth certificate, her father's place of
birth is "Schavoli", in Lithuania. It appears to be a wrong
spelling ... Does anybody knows the right spelling of
that town ?


Re: Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK #general

Peter Lebensold
 

In the case of my own family (as I have explained before in this forum), it
seems clear that my great-uncle, born a SZAFIR in Poland, and arrived in the
UK around 1907, took the name Joseph Leon WERNER at some point prior to his
May 1913 "Application for a Certificate of Naturalization" in Glasgow.

The Application not only makes no mention of any previous name, but also
(it seems clear) ** retroactively ** changes the last names of his parents
from SZAFIR to WERNER! (I have JRI-Poland records of a marriage between
two Szafirs with the same first names as Joseph's parents, in his home town,
but no Werners.)

Who, after all, in 1913 was going to check the records of a small town in Poland?

Peter Lebensold
Toronto
__
From: Harvey Kaplan <rvlkaplan@googlemail.com>
And I've just been looking at a naturalisation file for Solomon
WOLFSON, which makes no mention of the surname he had in Poland.


Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK- a legal requirement #general

Nick Rich
 

Just to throw my two pence worth into this subject, I have managed to
collect quite a few naturalisation papers for various ancestors who
naturalized in England, ranging >from the 1880's up until the 1920's, and the
level of information provided varies widely >from town to town. One's I have
for major cities, London and Birmingham tend to be more scant, and not all
of the boxes have always been filled in, and not always do they show the
family name in the old country. However, I have one document which was
completed in Bradford which has an amazing amount of information, and some
very lengthy references revealing all sorts of goodies including how much
money they declared as having in the bank, what was the financial turnover
of their business, what addresses they previously resided at, what other
family they had who did not live in England, which of course to a
genealogist is fantastic to have. I guess my point is that although there
was just one process, it doesn't necessarily follow that you should expect
the same result on all papers, and this may depend on who was filling in the
form, who was requesting the information, how much experience that person
requesting the information had with naturalisations, and quite possible how
many they had to deal with.

We all now live in an electronic age where generally processes tend to be
the same, or at least capture the same information. We are talking about an
age when the documents were handwritten, by various levels of intelligence
and knowledge of the process, and with varying amounts of time to complete
this. Therefore we should expect to see some variation in the end result.

Kind regards,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching - RYDZ, JELENKIEWICZ, EJMAN (Konin & Slesin), BLUMBERG (Riga)


Footnote #general

Marianne Tobin <martobin@...>
 

Does any one use Footnote, and is it a good site.

Thanks
Marianne Tobin

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK #general

Peter Lebensold
 

In the case of my own family (as I have explained before in this forum), it
seems clear that my great-uncle, born a SZAFIR in Poland, and arrived in the
UK around 1907, took the name Joseph Leon WERNER at some point prior to his
May 1913 "Application for a Certificate of Naturalization" in Glasgow.

The Application not only makes no mention of any previous name, but also
(it seems clear) ** retroactively ** changes the last names of his parents
from SZAFIR to WERNER! (I have JRI-Poland records of a marriage between
two Szafirs with the same first names as Joseph's parents, in his home town,
but no Werners.)

Who, after all, in 1913 was going to check the records of a small town in Poland?

Peter Lebensold
Toronto
__
From: Harvey Kaplan <rvlkaplan@googlemail.com>
And I've just been looking at a naturalisation file for Solomon
WOLFSON, which makes no mention of the surname he had in Poland.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization papers and change of name in the UK- a legal requirement #general

Nick Rich
 

Just to throw my two pence worth into this subject, I have managed to
collect quite a few naturalisation papers for various ancestors who
naturalized in England, ranging >from the 1880's up until the 1920's, and the
level of information provided varies widely >from town to town. One's I have
for major cities, London and Birmingham tend to be more scant, and not all
of the boxes have always been filled in, and not always do they show the
family name in the old country. However, I have one document which was
completed in Bradford which has an amazing amount of information, and some
very lengthy references revealing all sorts of goodies including how much
money they declared as having in the bank, what was the financial turnover
of their business, what addresses they previously resided at, what other
family they had who did not live in England, which of course to a
genealogist is fantastic to have. I guess my point is that although there
was just one process, it doesn't necessarily follow that you should expect
the same result on all papers, and this may depend on who was filling in the
form, who was requesting the information, how much experience that person
requesting the information had with naturalisations, and quite possible how
many they had to deal with.

We all now live in an electronic age where generally processes tend to be
the same, or at least capture the same information. We are talking about an
age when the documents were handwritten, by various levels of intelligence
and knowledge of the process, and with varying amounts of time to complete
this. Therefore we should expect to see some variation in the end result.

Kind regards,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching - RYDZ, JELENKIEWICZ, EJMAN (Konin & Slesin), BLUMBERG (Riga)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Footnote #general

Marianne Tobin <martobin@...>
 

Does any one use Footnote, and is it a good site.

Thanks
Marianne Tobin

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.