Date   

Help needed in locating a cemetery in Italy #sephardic

Bernie Kuran
 

Fellow researchers,
I'm helping a friend to try and locate the cemetery of her grandfather's
grave. Although not Sephardic, the grave is located in Italy, and hopefully
someone may be able to help.

There are 2 photos of the grave located here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15494

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15493

The inscription reads--
'Herz Kohen Geboren
1888 14 11 Lublin Polen Gestorben 6.12.1949"

You will notice in the foreground in the left corner, another tombstone with
the name "Elvira Cameo"

Also alongside to the right of the headstone, another small stone with
inscription
" Arno Stern
Pittore
23 Agosto 1949"

Please respond back directly at elitem@bigpond.net.au or on the ViewMate
page.

Many thanks,

Bernie Kuran
Melbourne, Australia


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Help needed in locating a cemetery in Italy #sephardic

Bernie Kuran
 

Fellow researchers,
I'm helping a friend to try and locate the cemetery of her grandfather's
grave. Although not Sephardic, the grave is located in Italy, and hopefully
someone may be able to help.

There are 2 photos of the grave located here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15494

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15493

The inscription reads--
'Herz Kohen Geboren
1888 14 11 Lublin Polen Gestorben 6.12.1949"

You will notice in the foreground in the left corner, another tombstone with
the name "Elvira Cameo"

Also alongside to the right of the headstone, another small stone with
inscription
" Arno Stern
Pittore
23 Agosto 1949"

Please respond back directly at elitem@bigpond.net.au or on the ViewMate
page.

Many thanks,

Bernie Kuran
Melbourne, Australia


Matzevah in Zhytomyr Ukraine - viewmate 15520 #general

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Viewmate http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15520 is a photo
of a tombstone in Section 1 of the Zhytomyr cemetery in Zhytomyr, Ukraine. My dad
and I are working on translating/transliterating the inscriptions of 2000 stones
from photos taken at the cemetery this past October (2009). These translations
will be put on the JOWBR template and given to JewishGen when we are finished. We
hope that we will be able to add photos of the rest of the graves in the future.

While we were translating the inscriptions, we noticed what we thought was unusual
wording - if you look at the stone you will see in the Hebrew/Yiddish on the bottom
the word HaChatan (the bridegroom) in front of the man's name. I thought it was
unusual enough to share with the group.

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Matzevah in Zhytomyr Ukraine - viewmate 15520 #general

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Viewmate http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15520 is a photo
of a tombstone in Section 1 of the Zhytomyr cemetery in Zhytomyr, Ukraine. My dad
and I are working on translating/transliterating the inscriptions of 2000 stones
from photos taken at the cemetery this past October (2009). These translations
will be put on the JOWBR template and given to JewishGen when we are finished. We
hope that we will be able to add photos of the rest of the graves in the future.

While we were translating the inscriptions, we noticed what we thought was unusual
wording - if you look at the stone you will see in the Hebrew/Yiddish on the bottom
the word HaChatan (the bridegroom) in front of the man's name. I thought it was
unusual enough to share with the group.

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ


Re: New photos of the synagogues of Galicia #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Steven Lasky wrote

I have recently updated the Museum's "Synagogues of Europe: Past and
Present" exhibition, adding more than eighty synagogue photos (mostly >from
the turn of the twentieth century to pre-WWII Europe) >from the collection
of Tomek Wisniewski of Bialystok, Poland. Within this addition to the
exhibition, you can now see synagogue photos new to the Museum of Family
History exhibition >from towns and cities that were once located in Galicia,
mostly at the turn of the twentieth century. Below is listed the name used
today for the town/city, and in parentheses is the name of the town/city
cir 1930):

Currently in the Ukraine, once in Galicia:

Berezdovtsy (Brzozdowce)
Gorodok Jagiellonski (Grodek Jagiellonski)
Gvozdets (Gwozdziec)
Ivano-Frankovo (Janow Lwowski)
Khodorov (Chodorow)
Novyy Yarychiv (Jaryczow Nowy)
Sukhostav (Suchostaw)
Zhidachov (Zydaczow)

Currently in Poland, once in Galicia:

Bakalarzewo
Lanckorona
(...)
The link to the exhibition is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/s/mfh-syn-europe.htm.
Good job, Steve but few corrections could be impemented:

Grodek Jagiellonski was renamed to Gorodok without "Jagiellonski."
Bakalarzewo was not located in Galicia; check Bialystok.
Lanckorona had 16 Jewish residents in 1900 and only 6 Jews
during the interwar period; no synagogue is mentioned in town.

Under Ukraine and former Galicia:

The Ukrainian town Chervonograd's former Polish name was
Krystonopol (not shown).
"Czernowitz" synagogue shown in 1929 picture. During interwar
period this Bukovina town was known as Cernauti, Romania, and
its current name is Chernivtsi, Ukraine.

Surpised to see picture of wooden synagogue in Shpanov (ex
Szpanow, Volin), since the place had only 6 Jewish residents.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Canada


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: New photos of the synagogues of Galicia #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Steven Lasky wrote

I have recently updated the Museum's "Synagogues of Europe: Past and
Present" exhibition, adding more than eighty synagogue photos (mostly >from
the turn of the twentieth century to pre-WWII Europe) >from the collection
of Tomek Wisniewski of Bialystok, Poland. Within this addition to the
exhibition, you can now see synagogue photos new to the Museum of Family
History exhibition >from towns and cities that were once located in Galicia,
mostly at the turn of the twentieth century. Below is listed the name used
today for the town/city, and in parentheses is the name of the town/city
cir 1930):

Currently in the Ukraine, once in Galicia:

Berezdovtsy (Brzozdowce)
Gorodok Jagiellonski (Grodek Jagiellonski)
Gvozdets (Gwozdziec)
Ivano-Frankovo (Janow Lwowski)
Khodorov (Chodorow)
Novyy Yarychiv (Jaryczow Nowy)
Sukhostav (Suchostaw)
Zhidachov (Zydaczow)

Currently in Poland, once in Galicia:

Bakalarzewo
Lanckorona
(...)
The link to the exhibition is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/s/mfh-syn-europe.htm.
Good job, Steve but few corrections could be impemented:

Grodek Jagiellonski was renamed to Gorodok without "Jagiellonski."
Bakalarzewo was not located in Galicia; check Bialystok.
Lanckorona had 16 Jewish residents in 1900 and only 6 Jews
during the interwar period; no synagogue is mentioned in town.

Under Ukraine and former Galicia:

The Ukrainian town Chervonograd's former Polish name was
Krystonopol (not shown).
"Czernowitz" synagogue shown in 1929 picture. During interwar
period this Bukovina town was known as Cernauti, Romania, and
its current name is Chernivtsi, Ukraine.

Surpised to see picture of wooden synagogue in Shpanov (ex
Szpanow, Volin), since the place had only 6 Jewish residents.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Canada


VM15495 Translation needed please #general

katie sobol <katie2727@...>
 

Dear Fellow Genners:

I need a full translation >from Yiddish (or Hebrew) to English please of a tombstone
I posted to ViewMate. To get there directly just click here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15495

I appreciate your help.
Thank you,

Katie Sobol
researcher #9386
researching: ZUCKERMAN, SUCHERMAN, MESSINGER, ZOLLER >from Brody, Austira, now in
Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VM15495 Translation needed please #general

katie sobol <katie2727@...>
 

Dear Fellow Genners:

I need a full translation >from Yiddish (or Hebrew) to English please of a tombstone
I posted to ViewMate. To get there directly just click here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15495

I appreciate your help.
Thank you,

Katie Sobol
researcher #9386
researching: ZUCKERMAN, SUCHERMAN, MESSINGER, ZOLLER >from Brody, Austira, now in
Ukraine.


Kojetin records in Prerov archive #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

thanks to julius muller and avraham steiner for the following info.

There are quite a few interesting collections on Jewish community in Prerov archive:

1890-1900 List of members and house owners
1850-1896 Register of Jewish families listed by house numbers
1850-1896 Alphabetic list to aboved register
1850-1887 death register incl. Jews, plaque epidemy in 1866
1785-1886 2 books on Jewish houses/ownerships and contracts
1820 &#8211; 1919 Jewish school

However, as I told you the archive is iopen in Monday and Wednesday.

Another possible location for your visit:
The regional archive in prerov. I think they hole some valuable documents
about Kojetin Jews
http://www.archives.cz/zao/prerov/home/index.html


Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Kojetin records in Prerov archive #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

thanks to julius muller and avraham steiner for the following info.

There are quite a few interesting collections on Jewish community in Prerov archive:

1890-1900 List of members and house owners
1850-1896 Register of Jewish families listed by house numbers
1850-1896 Alphabetic list to aboved register
1850-1887 death register incl. Jews, plaque epidemy in 1866
1785-1886 2 books on Jewish houses/ownerships and contracts
1820 &#8211; 1919 Jewish school

However, as I told you the archive is iopen in Monday and Wednesday.

Another possible location for your visit:
The regional archive in prerov. I think they hole some valuable documents
about Kojetin Jews
http://www.archives.cz/zao/prerov/home/index.html


Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD


moravian provincial archives online #austria-czech

cassiapartane@...
 

What's Nu alerted us to the moravian provincial archives online, which
seems great for those of us with moravian ancestry. However, do the
archives have any Jewish content? Does anyone know? Secondly, it
seems to have very little in English despite having English as an
option.

Cassia Partane
Sydney

Moravian names: FASFL, SCHNEK, BURGMANN, PREZNER


Zentral Friedhof, Wien #austria-czech

Palekaiko
 

I am looking for someone, very reliable, to care for many grave sites
at the Zentral Friedhof, Wien. Please respond privately to
palekaiko@gmail.com

Michael Diamant


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech moravian provincial archives online #austria-czech

cassiapartane@...
 

What's Nu alerted us to the moravian provincial archives online, which
seems great for those of us with moravian ancestry. However, do the
archives have any Jewish content? Does anyone know? Secondly, it
seems to have very little in English despite having English as an
option.

Cassia Partane
Sydney

Moravian names: FASFL, SCHNEK, BURGMANN, PREZNER


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Zentral Friedhof, Wien #austria-czech

Palekaiko
 

I am looking for someone, very reliable, to care for many grave sites
at the Zentral Friedhof, Wien. Please respond privately to
palekaiko@gmail.com

Michael Diamant


Searching for info on Viennese business taken over by Hitler in 1939 #austria-czech

Deborah HOLMAN
 

I am attempting to gather information on my Great-grandfather's business, Lital. Sigmund LICHTENTHAL,
along with his wife, Rosa and son, Paul owned a very successful chain of hat stores and factory until the
business was taken by the Nazis in 1939. I have a detailed memorandum of the events which may be of
interest.

My questions are these: 1. How would I go about finding information about the commercial aspects of the
business, such as leases, contracts, photos, advertisements? 2. Is there a group which might be interested
in my family's story and the documentation of the takeover? It is but one of many, many such tragedies but
I would like it to b remembered and noted somewhere other my family genealogy.

The business went by the name Lital (Hutfabrik Lital) and was located at: VII Mariahilferstrasse 88a.

Any help to point me in a direction would be much appreciated.

Deb Holman
CT-USA

Researching: LICHTENTHAL- Austria, Romania, Poland, BERGER- Hungary, SPIEGEL-Austria, Holland, Java,
Poland, WEISS- Hungary, Austria


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Searching for info on Viennese business taken over by Hitler in 1939 #austria-czech

Deborah HOLMAN
 

I am attempting to gather information on my Great-grandfather's business, Lital. Sigmund LICHTENTHAL,
along with his wife, Rosa and son, Paul owned a very successful chain of hat stores and factory until the
business was taken by the Nazis in 1939. I have a detailed memorandum of the events which may be of
interest.

My questions are these: 1. How would I go about finding information about the commercial aspects of the
business, such as leases, contracts, photos, advertisements? 2. Is there a group which might be interested
in my family's story and the documentation of the takeover? It is but one of many, many such tragedies but
I would like it to b remembered and noted somewhere other my family genealogy.

The business went by the name Lital (Hutfabrik Lital) and was located at: VII Mariahilferstrasse 88a.

Any help to point me in a direction would be much appreciated.

Deb Holman
CT-USA

Researching: LICHTENTHAL- Austria, Romania, Poland, BERGER- Hungary, SPIEGEL-Austria, Holland, Java,
Poland, WEISS- Hungary, Austria


New photos of the synagogues of Belarus #belarus

steve725@...
 

I have recently updated the Museum's "Synagogues of Europe: Past and
Present" exhibition, adding more than eighty synagogue photos (mostly >from
the turn of the twentieth century to pre-WWII Europe) >from the collection of
Tomek Wisniewski of Bialystok, Poland. Within this addition to the
exhibition, you can now see synagogue photos new to the Museum of Family
History exhibition >from the following locations in today's Belarus. All of
these synagogues were once in towns/cities in Poland before WWII, but are
now in Belarus. Below is listed the name used today for the town/city and in
parentheses is the name of the town/city when located in pre-war Poland):

Derechin (Derecyn)
Gorodok (Grodek)
Hrodna (Grodno)
Kamyanyets (Kamieniec Litewski)
Kozhan-Gorodok (Kozangrodek)
Navahrudak (Nowogrodek)
Odelsk (Odelsk)
Ostryna (Ostryna)
Ozery (Jeziory)
Peski (Piaski)
Volpa (Wolpa)

There are, of course, more such synagogue photos >from today's Belarus within
this exhibition, as well as >from elsewhere in Europe, and more are always
welcome.

The link to the exhibition is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/s/mfh-syn-europe.htm. To see the Belarus page,
just click on the link provided on this page. Please note that the URLs to
and within this exhibition has changed. All material >from this exhibition,
because there is a great quantity of same, has been placed in its own web
folder. All the other country webpages for this particular exhibition have
changed too, but as long as you go through the aforementioned main
exhibition page, you shouldn't have a problem. If you've created a link to
any of the exhibition's country pages, please change them when you can
(though the links still work for the time being.)

Thank you.
Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus New photos of the synagogues of Belarus #belarus

steve725@...
 

I have recently updated the Museum's "Synagogues of Europe: Past and
Present" exhibition, adding more than eighty synagogue photos (mostly >from
the turn of the twentieth century to pre-WWII Europe) >from the collection of
Tomek Wisniewski of Bialystok, Poland. Within this addition to the
exhibition, you can now see synagogue photos new to the Museum of Family
History exhibition >from the following locations in today's Belarus. All of
these synagogues were once in towns/cities in Poland before WWII, but are
now in Belarus. Below is listed the name used today for the town/city and in
parentheses is the name of the town/city when located in pre-war Poland):

Derechin (Derecyn)
Gorodok (Grodek)
Hrodna (Grodno)
Kamyanyets (Kamieniec Litewski)
Kozhan-Gorodok (Kozangrodek)
Navahrudak (Nowogrodek)
Odelsk (Odelsk)
Ostryna (Ostryna)
Ozery (Jeziory)
Peski (Piaski)
Volpa (Wolpa)

There are, of course, more such synagogue photos >from today's Belarus within
this exhibition, as well as >from elsewhere in Europe, and more are always
welcome.

The link to the exhibition is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/s/mfh-syn-europe.htm. To see the Belarus page,
just click on the link provided on this page. Please note that the URLs to
and within this exhibition has changed. All material >from this exhibition,
because there is a great quantity of same, has been placed in its own web
folder. All the other country webpages for this particular exhibition have
changed too, but as long as you go through the aforementioned main
exhibition page, you shouldn't have a problem. If you've created a link to
any of the exhibition's country pages, please change them when you can
(though the links still work for the time being.)

Thank you.
Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


Re: 1919 Kiev Pogroms and Bandit Murders [MODERATOR - CORRECTED VERSION] #ukraine

Ittai Hershman
 

As a follow up to my query of 27 May, a kind reader pointed me to a
commercial company -- Eastview.com -- that "sells microfilm copies of
Russian documents that contain lists of murder victims of the 1919 pogroms"
with which he had a positive experience finding a relative. He cautioned
the lists are in Cyrillic.

Searching "pogrom" on their web site yields 27 results; but, many of the
titles are no longer available.

However, a set of books published in 2003 and 2007 are available and look
promising. Further, the 2003 edition appears to be available in the NY
Public Library (e.g. search author "Opendik, Vladimir" on NYPL.org).

I will have a look when I next get to the NYPL 42nd Street branch, but
perhaps this will be a higher priority for other readers, so I am sharing
this information "as is".

Ittai Hershman


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: 1919 Kiev Pogroms and Bandit Murders [MODERATOR - CORRECTED VERSION] #ukraine

Ittai Hershman
 

As a follow up to my query of 27 May, a kind reader pointed me to a
commercial company -- Eastview.com -- that "sells microfilm copies of
Russian documents that contain lists of murder victims of the 1919 pogroms"
with which he had a positive experience finding a relative. He cautioned
the lists are in Cyrillic.

Searching "pogrom" on their web site yields 27 results; but, many of the
titles are no longer available.

However, a set of books published in 2003 and 2007 are available and look
promising. Further, the 2003 edition appears to be available in the NY
Public Library (e.g. search author "Opendik, Vladimir" on NYPL.org).

I will have a look when I next get to the NYPL 42nd Street branch, but
perhaps this will be a higher priority for other readers, so I am sharing
this information "as is".

Ittai Hershman