Date   

Ish Horovitz #galicia

Inacio Steinhardt
 

Dear Carol,

I think that I can offer an explanation for Ish Horowitz.

Horowitz and Epstein were originally members of the Sephardi family
BENVENISTE >from Spain who moved to Central Europe. One branch
settled in the German town of Eppstein, in Hesse, the other to
Horovice in central Bohemia, now in Czech Republic. Each adopted
the name of the place as their surname.

The Benveniste of Spain were Levi's. Thus all legitimate Epstein and
Horovitz are Levi (>from the tribe of Levi). I say "legitimate", because
among Jews people have adopted surnames for a variety of reasons.
The first Benveniste to adopt the Horovitz surname choose to
identify themselves as ">from Horovitz" using a known Hebrew
formula "Ish Horovitz", meaning "man >from Horovitz" (ish means
man). As an example, Judas Iscariot, the disciple of Jesus, was >from
Cariot, Ish Cariot. Eventually the prefix Ish, >from Ish Horovitz, was
dropped remaining only Horovitz. But old documents still show Ish
Horovits. Thus, your husband, as a legitimate Horovitz, is a Levi...
and his origin is Sephardi.

Regards
Inacio

Inacio Steinhardt
Ganei Tikva 55900 - Israel
inacio@steinhardts.com


Carol Eigen Tannenbaum <caroltannenbaum75@gmail.com> wrote:

<<... An elder cousin of the Horowitz family born in Sokolivka
consistently used the prefix Ish when discussing her Horowitz family
as well as previous Horowitz generations, as in Menachem Mendel Ish
Horowitz. Does anyone know what Ish refers to, and why that
designation?>>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Ish Horovitz #galicia

Inacio Steinhardt
 

Dear Carol,

I think that I can offer an explanation for Ish Horowitz.

Horowitz and Epstein were originally members of the Sephardi family
BENVENISTE >from Spain who moved to Central Europe. One branch
settled in the German town of Eppstein, in Hesse, the other to
Horovice in central Bohemia, now in Czech Republic. Each adopted
the name of the place as their surname.

The Benveniste of Spain were Levi's. Thus all legitimate Epstein and
Horovitz are Levi (>from the tribe of Levi). I say "legitimate", because
among Jews people have adopted surnames for a variety of reasons.
The first Benveniste to adopt the Horovitz surname choose to
identify themselves as ">from Horovitz" using a known Hebrew
formula "Ish Horovitz", meaning "man >from Horovitz" (ish means
man). As an example, Judas Iscariot, the disciple of Jesus, was >from
Cariot, Ish Cariot. Eventually the prefix Ish, >from Ish Horovitz, was
dropped remaining only Horovitz. But old documents still show Ish
Horovits. Thus, your husband, as a legitimate Horovitz, is a Levi...
and his origin is Sephardi.

Regards
Inacio

Inacio Steinhardt
Ganei Tikva 55900 - Israel
inacio@steinhardts.com


Carol Eigen Tannenbaum <caroltannenbaum75@gmail.com> wrote:

<<... An elder cousin of the Horowitz family born in Sokolivka
consistently used the prefix Ish when discussing her Horowitz family
as well as previous Horowitz generations, as in Menachem Mendel Ish
Horowitz. Does anyone know what Ish refers to, and why that
designation?>>


Re: Meaning of "Ish" #galicia

Shlomo Katz
 

Horwitz is the name of a town (Horovice, Czech Republic, 30 miles SW
of Praha). "Ish Horwitz" means "Man >from Horowitz." I, too, have
relatives who use the name Ish Horowitz.

The model for this is in the Mishnah Tractate Avot, chapter 1, where
there is a reference to Yose Ish Yerushalayim / Man >from Jerusalem.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, MD

Carol Eigen Tannenbaum <caroltannenbaum75@gmail.com> wrote:

<<... An elder cousin of the Horowitz family born in Sokolivka
consistently used the prefix Ish when discussing her Horowitz family
as well as previous Horowitz generations, as in Menachem Mendel Ish
Horowitz. Does anyone know what Ish refers to, and why that
designation?>>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Meaning of "Ish" #galicia

Shlomo Katz
 

Horwitz is the name of a town (Horovice, Czech Republic, 30 miles SW
of Praha). "Ish Horwitz" means "Man >from Horowitz." I, too, have
relatives who use the name Ish Horowitz.

The model for this is in the Mishnah Tractate Avot, chapter 1, where
there is a reference to Yose Ish Yerushalayim / Man >from Jerusalem.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, MD

Carol Eigen Tannenbaum <caroltannenbaum75@gmail.com> wrote:

<<... An elder cousin of the Horowitz family born in Sokolivka
consistently used the prefix Ish when discussing her Horowitz family
as well as previous Horowitz generations, as in Menachem Mendel Ish
Horowitz. Does anyone know what Ish refers to, and why that
designation?>>


Launch of Gesher Galicia's Przemysl Identification Project #galicia

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is launching an extensive longer-term project to
identify 573 Jewish record books of unknown origin housed in the
Przemysl State Archive in Poland. Involved are index books of vital
records (births, deaths, marriages), including a few index books of
unspecified type, as well as some sets of community records. While
the dates and most of the record types relating to each register are
known, there is no information about their geographic origin. Most of
the books, though, are presumed to be >from towns in the former
Galicia. Identifying the town of origin of each book will undoubtedly
lead to interesting genealogical discoveries for Galician researchers.

These books are all subfiles of "File 69" - a set of unknown books -
of Fond 154 of the Przemysl State Archive. A list of these index books
can therefore be found in the "Inventories" section of the Gesher
Galicia website, within the section for "File 69" of Fond 154 of the
Przemysl archive, at:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/inventories/fond-154/ .

The project has been approved by the Polish State Archives, is being
managed by the project's secretariat in Poland, and is being carried
out in cooperation with the Przemysl archive.

Gesher Galicia members now have an exclusive opportunity to
participate in the identification project, in this way advancing the
knowledge of the genealogical community. If you are not a member of
Gesher Galicia and wish to take part in the project, you are most
welcome to join, at: https://www.geshergalicia.org/membership/ .

New identifications of these presently unknown books will be
announced publicly, at regular intervals, and the information shared
with the Przemysl State Archive.

Further public information can be found on the Gesher Galicia
website at:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/przemysl-id/
and, for Gesher Galicia members only, in a dedicated section of the
Members Portal.

Questions relating directly to this project should be sent to:
przemysl-id@geshergalicia.org .
For all other inquiries on Gesher Galicia matters please contact:
info@geshergalicia.org .

Please DO NOT REPLY directly to this SIG e-mail message.


- Piotr Gumola
Project Coordinator, Przemysl Identification Project

- Pawel Malinowski
Technical Manager, Przemysl Identification Project

- Tony Kahane
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org/

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Launch of Gesher Galicia's Przemysl Identification Project #galicia

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is launching an extensive longer-term project to
identify 573 Jewish record books of unknown origin housed in the
Przemysl State Archive in Poland. Involved are index books of vital
records (births, deaths, marriages), including a few index books of
unspecified type, as well as some sets of community records. While
the dates and most of the record types relating to each register are
known, there is no information about their geographic origin. Most of
the books, though, are presumed to be >from towns in the former
Galicia. Identifying the town of origin of each book will undoubtedly
lead to interesting genealogical discoveries for Galician researchers.

These books are all subfiles of "File 69" - a set of unknown books -
of Fond 154 of the Przemysl State Archive. A list of these index books
can therefore be found in the "Inventories" section of the Gesher
Galicia website, within the section for "File 69" of Fond 154 of the
Przemysl archive, at:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/inventories/fond-154/ .

The project has been approved by the Polish State Archives, is being
managed by the project's secretariat in Poland, and is being carried
out in cooperation with the Przemysl archive.

Gesher Galicia members now have an exclusive opportunity to
participate in the identification project, in this way advancing the
knowledge of the genealogical community. If you are not a member of
Gesher Galicia and wish to take part in the project, you are most
welcome to join, at: https://www.geshergalicia.org/membership/ .

New identifications of these presently unknown books will be
announced publicly, at regular intervals, and the information shared
with the Przemysl State Archive.

Further public information can be found on the Gesher Galicia
website at:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/przemysl-id/
and, for Gesher Galicia members only, in a dedicated section of the
Members Portal.

Questions relating directly to this project should be sent to:
przemysl-id@geshergalicia.org .
For all other inquiries on Gesher Galicia matters please contact:
info@geshergalicia.org .

Please DO NOT REPLY directly to this SIG e-mail message.


- Piotr Gumola
Project Coordinator, Przemysl Identification Project

- Pawel Malinowski
Technical Manager, Przemysl Identification Project

- Tony Kahane
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org/

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Seeking descendants of Meyer & Shimon Goldstein/Goldsztern of Terespol/Brest

mamabirdlouise@...
 

Seeking descendants of Meyer (Ida Nerenbaim) and Shimon (Gittel, divorced) Goldstein from Terespol/Brest, Poland, my grandfather Sol (Szojel) Goldstein's older brothers. Both arrived in New York between 1900-1906 and lived variously in the Bronx, Newark NJ and Manhattan.  Meyer’s children were Ann (Al Simmons), b. 1908, Jack (Helen), b. 1910, Paula/Pauline (Herbie Eager), b. 1913 and Marsha (Nathan Whitman), b. 1919.  Jack’s children were Iris, b. 1936 and Barry (Judy Mittman, divorced), b. 1939; Marsha’s were Sheila (Norman Greif), Stanley and Elaine.  Shimon’s children were Frieda and Sol. 
--
Louise Goldstein

Researching GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSZTERN, BRANDT, WOLOCH, HERSZENFELD (Terespol, Piszczac, Poland; Brest, Belarus); RONEN (Kiyev, Fastov, Ukraine; Lyoev, Belarus); LOPUSHANSKIY; ROZENZUMEN/BEN-DOV (Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland; Israel); BATTALEN, POPKOV (Voronezh, Russia); CHALEWSKY/CHALLOV (Krive Ozero, Ukraine).  https://familyhistorieslouise.com/


Re: New World War ll Russian Army Database

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Thanks Jane, I am delighted that the posting was so successful!
Jan

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 3:18:48 PM PDT, jnrollins@... <jnrollins@...> wrote:


Thanks so much for posting this, Jan. I found my grandmother's brother, Isaak Klebansky, who was an ophthalmologist in the Soviet Army. It even included a photograph, which was instantly recognizable in comparison to earlier photographs I have on hand. This is the first document/index confirming my grandmother's statement that he served in the Soviet Army that I have ever seen, so it is very exciting.

Jane
--
Jane Neff Rollins
Montrose CA USA

Surname -- Locations:
Kishinevsky -- Tiraspol
Zeilikovich -- Tiraspol
Sirota -- Tiraspol
Klebansky -- Slonim
Vatnik -- Slonim
Chernorudsky -- Berdichev
Pekler -- Zhitomir
Gumenik -- Zhitomir


Re: New World War ll Russian Army Database

Jane Neff Rollins
 

Thanks so much for posting this, Jan. I found my grandmother's brother, Isaak Klebansky, who was an ophthalmologist in the Soviet Army. It even included a photograph, which was instantly recognizable in comparison to earlier photographs I have on hand. This is the first document/index confirming my grandmother's statement that he served in the Soviet Army that I have ever seen, so it is very exciting.

Jane
--
Jane Neff Rollins
Montrose CA USA

Surname -- Locations:
Kishinevsky -- Tiraspol
Zeilikovich -- Tiraspol
Sirota -- Tiraspol
Klebansky -- Slonim
Vatnik -- Slonim
Chernorudsky -- Berdichev
Pekler -- Zhitomir
Gumenik -- Zhitomir


Re: Help with translating Russian / Polish documents

Sam Eneman
 

David,

You might also consider uploading your images to ViewMate, JewishGen's service for getting help with translations. There you and translators can easily follow and compare submitted translations. Here's the link:  https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/

Sam Eneman
Charlotte NC USA


JGSCT November 2019 Program

gkr
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut hosts Stephen Denker on Sunday, November 17, 2019, at 1:30 pm, at Temple Sinai, 41 West Hartford Rd, Newington.  The topic of the presentation is " How to Design and Construct a Family History Book Entirely by Yourself ".

The presentation covers, in detail, how to design and construct a book for self-publishing, including aesthetic considerations and organization of subject matter. Included will be ways to prepare, repair and enhance documents, and other research materials for publication, including specific examples to illustrate techniques and options. One major problem I will treat is putting together a book that contains records (e.g., Censuses and Ship Manifests) that are much too large to fit onto one-page

Stephen Denker and his wife have been collaboratively researching their family histories since 1999. Together they have self-published five hard-cover family history and genealogy books (exceeding 800 pages) entirely by themselves. In 2007, they spent two weeks in Havana, Cuba, doing research and visiting where his family lived in the 1920s. They updated the 1400 burial records of the United Hebrew Congregation Jewish Cemetery and took a complete set of gravestone photographs that they placed on JewishGen Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR).
 
The program is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit www.jgsct.org.


JGSCT November 2019 Program

gkr
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut hosts Stephen Denker on Sunday, November 17, 2019, at 1:30 pm, at Temple Sinai, 41 West Hartford Rd, Newington.  The topic of the presentation is " How to Design and Construct a Family History Book Entirely by Yourself ".
 
The presentation covers, in detail, how to design and construct a book for self-publishing, including aesthetic considerations and organization of subject matter. Included will be ways to prepare, repair and enhance documents, and other research materials for publication, including specific examples to illustrate techniques and options. One major problem I will treat is putting together a book that contains records (e.g., Censuses and Ship Manifests) that are much too large to fit onto one-page
 
Stephen Denker and his wife have been collaboratively researching their family histories since 1999. Together they have self-published five hard-cover family history and genealogy books (exceeding 800 pages) entirely by themselves. In 2007, they spent two weeks in Havana, Cuba, doing research and visiting where his family lived in the 1920s. They updated the 1400 burial records of the United Hebrew Congregation Jewish Cemetery and took a complete set of gravestone photographs that they placed on JewishGen Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR).
 
The program is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit www.jgsct.org.

Gail K Reynolds, Publicity Chair, Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut


Re: Finding a Genealogist

Renée K. Carl
 

There are a number of professional genealogists who regularly speak at IAJGS, and at other conferences.
Many professional genealogists, Jewish or not, will have a listing at the Association of Professional Genealogists, APGEN.org. There are also some pages there that give you information on what to look for when hiring a professional. Those who have become certified (think board certification, like a doctor), can be found listed at https://bcgcertification.org.
Another good place to ask is your local Jewish Genealogy Society (JGS)

Renee Carl
Washington, DC


LOWENTHAL/STERN/TOVEL #poland

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@...>
 

I am researching my wife's family and would like some help on parts of the family tree.

My wife's grandmother, Nentzia (Anna) LOWENTHAL was the daughter of Solomon LOWENTHAL and Getel (Lena) BLIER.  She was born in 1886 in Brzesko, Poland, and died in 1947 in Pittsburgh, PA.  Her brother was Abraham LOWENTHAL, born in 1875 in Brzesko and died in 1964 in Queens, NY.  Her sister was Chaya LOWENTHAL, who married Moses STERN, son of Leon STERN.  Leon had six children and his brother Avroham had four children.

Chaya and Moses had seven children, whom we think were also born in Poland.  Solomon (Seymour), born in 1898, married Channa (Anna) TOVEL.  Harry, born in 1902 and died in 1974 in Spring Valley, NY, married Anna MILLER of Pennsylvania.  Sarah, born sometime after then, married Harry BAUM.  Leon, born in 1910 and died in 2003 in Spring Valley, married Sylvia MILLMAN.  Genya, born in 1911, married Saul GUTFRIEND, and they may have perished in 1944 in the Shoah.  Fred, born in 1915 and died in 1979 in Spring Valley, married Elsie COHEN.  Nathan (Nat), born in 1917 and died in 1972 in Spring Valley, married Roslyn SAMPSON.

While researching the Lowenthals, I became aware of another name, Ruth (Rita) TEWEL, daughter of Mates TEWEL and Hendla LOWENTHAL.  She was born in 1909 and lived in Pittsburgh.  She married Benjamin NEWBERG and had two daughters.  After Benjamin's death, she was married to Allen SWISS.  Later, she married Morris WEIGER.  She died in 2000 in Pittsburgh.  It occurs to me that she might be related to Anna Tovel Stern, but because her mother was a Lowenthal she might logically be related to Solomon Lowenthal.  I would like to find out more information about the Sterns in addition to the relationship of Rita Weiger to the rest of the family.  Please let me know if you have any information.


--
Sheldon Dan
sheldan1955@...


Yizkor Book Translation Coordinators Needed #bessarabia

R Jaffer
 

Dear Fellow Bessarabia Researchers,

Most of us were not able to ask our immigrant ancestors about the
towns in which they lived in Bessarabia, and few of our immigrant
ancestors willingly spoke of their past with their children. The best
way to get a flavor of what life was like for them, is to read a
Yizkor Book if one had been written for your town after the Holocaust.
Unfortunately, these books are not accessible to us unless we are able
to fluently read Yiddish or Hebrew. Binny Lewis is the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project Manager to translate all books into English.

As the last translation coordinator for the Briceni book, I have
experience working with a Yiddish translator, soliciting funds for
professional translations, and bringing the book to print. While not
finding my relatives mentioned in this book, I learned a great deal
about the community, and I can now visualize the layout of the town
and daily life.

On behalf of the Bessarabia Sig, I am now seeking new translation
coordinators for the books listed below. You do not Hebrew or Yiddish
language skills to be a coordinator. You will be given a list of paid
professional translators, or you may ask for volunteer translators for
specific sections. Please contact me privately to learn more about
this rewarding position.

Thank you for considering these positions,
Roberta Jaffer
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Yizkor Books Translation Project Manager

Dumbraveni - Dombroven Book; memorial to the first Jewish Agricultural
colony in Bessarabia
or
-There once was a town - a descriptive monograph of the town of Dombroven

Edinet - Yad l'Yedinitz; memorial book for the Jewish community of
Yedintzi, Bessarabia, Moldova

Lipcani - The community of Lipkany; memorial book

Marculesti - Markuleshty; Memorial to a Jewish Colony in Bessarabia

Novoselytsya - Anthology of Novoselitsa, Twin Towns

Otaci - Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish Community in Bessarabia

Sokyryany - Sekiryani, Bessarabia - alive and destroyed

Telenesti - A small town in Bessarabia; in memory of our town Telenesti


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Yizkor Book Translation Coordinators Needed #bessarabia

R Jaffer
 

Dear Fellow Bessarabia Researchers,

Most of us were not able to ask our immigrant ancestors about the
towns in which they lived in Bessarabia, and few of our immigrant
ancestors willingly spoke of their past with their children. The best
way to get a flavor of what life was like for them, is to read a
Yizkor Book if one had been written for your town after the Holocaust.
Unfortunately, these books are not accessible to us unless we are able
to fluently read Yiddish or Hebrew. Binny Lewis is the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project Manager to translate all books into English.

As the last translation coordinator for the Briceni book, I have
experience working with a Yiddish translator, soliciting funds for
professional translations, and bringing the book to print. While not
finding my relatives mentioned in this book, I learned a great deal
about the community, and I can now visualize the layout of the town
and daily life.

On behalf of the Bessarabia Sig, I am now seeking new translation
coordinators for the books listed below. You do not Hebrew or Yiddish
language skills to be a coordinator. You will be given a list of paid
professional translators, or you may ask for volunteer translators for
specific sections. Please contact me privately to learn more about
this rewarding position.

Thank you for considering these positions,
Roberta Jaffer
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Yizkor Books Translation Project Manager

Dumbraveni - Dombroven Book; memorial to the first Jewish Agricultural
colony in Bessarabia
or
-There once was a town - a descriptive monograph of the town of Dombroven

Edinet - Yad l'Yedinitz; memorial book for the Jewish community of
Yedintzi, Bessarabia, Moldova

Lipcani - The community of Lipkany; memorial book

Marculesti - Markuleshty; Memorial to a Jewish Colony in Bessarabia

Novoselytsya - Anthology of Novoselitsa, Twin Towns

Otaci - Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish Community in Bessarabia

Sokyryany - Sekiryani, Bessarabia - alive and destroyed

Telenesti - A small town in Bessarabia; in memory of our town Telenesti


Re: Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

iwagner@...
 

I visit a Family History Center on a regular basis and would be happy to search for the documents if you can be more specific.  As noted previously, there are seven rolls of film, each roll containing from 400+ to 750+ images.  In my own research, I’ve scrolled through rolls of film without success due to language barriers and the lack of a logical ordering system. I’ll give it a try if you can prove more information. Send me an email.


Reviews of visits to Hungarian and Transylvanian Cemeteries #hungary

michael_perl9@...
 

I visited a number of towns and cities in Eastern Hungary and Transylvania over the last month. I wrote updates/reviews for IAJGS but thought it would be of interest to the list as well. In many cases, the location descriptions available >from Mazsihisz or Fedrom are inaccurate or incomplete and I have given more specific locations.
I also visited Debrecen and Szekesfehervar but have nothing to add to what is already known.

Please scroll down to read the towns of interest.

The towns visited were:
Hungary:
Berettyoujfalu
Derecske
Hajdusamson
Puspokladany
Vancsod

Romania:
Arad Old Neolog
Baia Mare / Nagybanya
Carei / Nagykaroly
Cermei / Cselmo
Chisieneu Cris / Kisjeno
Mediesu Aurit / Aranyosmeggyes
Pincota/Pancota, Arad County
Seini / Szinervaralja
Vanatori / Vadasz, Arad County

HUNGARY

Berettyoujfalu, Hungary

I visited both cemeteries on Vagohid utca and Szabolcska utca and both are pitiful as I will describe below. The original entry says they are not maintained but this is untrue. The grass had been cut and the cemeteries have walls. Both gates were unlocked.

Vagohid utca is the newer cemetery and contains a small holocaust memorial. The gate was open. There is one ohel as well as a separate area for Cohanim. The men and women are not buried together. The pitiful part is that this cemetery has been pillaged and there are many visible bases where the stones have been taken. There are still many stones standing but a large percentage have disappeared at some point.

Szabadka utca has a gate with a lock but the gate was tied with wire into the lock. One need only untwist the wire to get in. This is the older of the two cemeteries and is slightly closer to the center of town. This was the most pitiful cemetery I have visited. The cemetery has perhaps 30 stones of which 10 are lying under grass or mud and most of the area is empty. It is smaller than the one on Vagoghid u. but one can imagine that this would have been fairly full for a newer one to be opened. Today one can see that almost all the stones have been stolen or destroyed. There is a well known story of someone coming with a truck in the early 1990s and stealing many stones. There are a few very old stones left, with one legible one >from 1824. There is one ohel that has been rebuilt on the site but it is unfinished and very poor quality construction. There are large dead branches and sections of trees lying about the property but the grass has been cut. Berettyoujfalu is a larger town and had a very old and sizable community so for one interested in family research, this was devastating to see.

Derecske
The exact address is on a dirt road named Hajnal utca (it is on Google Maps). As you are heading out of the village on Dozsa Gyorgy u., just as it turns into Konyari Ut, you turn right into Hajnal.
Here is a picture >from Google Maps:
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3500197,21.577002,3a,75y,179.57h,68.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sAxOyZQqVLZBkNdcu-XDTKw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Along the road, one passes the town?s Catholic cemetery on the left including the caretaker?s house. >from this house, keep driving for 600 ft (183 meters) to the grass driveway to get to the cemetery gate. On your left will be a large field and on the other side of that field you will see a large wall surrounding the Jewish cemetery. As you reach the end of the field, you will see a grass driveway on your left that is blocked by a makeshift gate made of logs. One needs to take the crosspiece out of the metal clasp and lift the gate to open it outwards. Then drive all the way down past another small cemetery on the right and the Jewish cemetery gate will be visible. It has a combination lock. On the metal pillar of the gate, two phone numbers are written which one can call to get the code.

This cemetery was in excellent condition. The grass and trees had been cut and at some point in the last 10 years, the fallen tombstones were re-erected on placed on new cement bases, even the broken ones.
Grave dates range >from the mid 1800s until the late 1940s and 60% are in Hebrew only. If one is looking for graves >from the 1800s, in just about all rural towns they are in Hebrew only so it is necessary to have someone who can read them quickly. Many of these stones do contain the family name though so as long as you can read Hebrew they are useful.

Hajdusamson

Location: Hajdusamson I is listed as being on Jokai utca. This is inaccurate. The cemetery is off Jokai ucta on Szeder utca. It is on the right hand side, about 1/3 of the way down the street and before you reach a children's playground. The playground has a water pump to wash your hands after visiting the cemetery.
The caretaker listed on this site, Istvan Deak has passed away. The cemetery is surrounded by a cement wall, not more than 20 years old and a locked gate. There is a combination lock on the gate and I believe the code is with the community in Debrecen. It is unclear who maintains it but it is well-kept.

The cemetery has been restored with all fallen stones having been cemented into a new base. The grounds have been fairly well maintained although the many trees on the property make this more complicated due to their seeds. I was able to get to all tombstones although some were cemented very close to the back wall and there are trees growing near the fence that have not been cut back enough.
Hajdusamson is a very old community but this cemetery is fairly new in that community's existence with stones starting >from the 1880s. There is one ohel on the property with 2 graves in it.
65% of the stones are in Hebrew only. If you are searching for family graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Hajdusamson II: The site is listed as being on Jokai utca 700 metres away. This is accurate but to be more precise, it is at the bend where Jokai utca ends and Janostavadulo begins. If driving on Jokai utca, it is located on the right hand side.
This cemetery is the exact opposite of Samson I. There is a wire fence with a gate but that gate is rusty and has no lock. I was able to get in and walk up the small hill to the cemetery but it is entirely overgrown with long grass and trees with thick thorns. It is a little smaller in size than the new cemetery but hard to judge the exact size given the overgrowth. There is a rabbi's tomb with a fence that is clearly visited as the long grass is trodden on towards this location. The rest is accessible only if wearing work gloves to push away the thorny branches. Many stones have sunk into the ground and could be rescued with some restoration work. There are 20-30 visible stones that I could see but it is very likely that many are hidden behind bushes and trees or have sunk underground.

Any stone that was visible was in Hebrew only.

Puspokladany, Hungary

The address given by the Mazshihisz excel spreadsheet is Hosszuhati ut and is somewhat accurate. However, this is not how the street is known on Google maps. Furthermore, the cemetery cannot be seen easily >from the road. It is on the road of all the town cemeteries named Eross Lajos u. Best thing is to type "Puspokladanyi temeto" into Google Maps. Drive along this road and go past the entrance to the main Christian cemetery. Keep driving and follow the fence line on the right. Follow the road around the bend. Once you reach the end of the last of the cemeteries along the fence, there is a dirt driveway that is not signposted which you turn right onto. In the distance one can see the concrete walls of the Jewish cemetery and keep driving towards it. There is a gate but it was wide open and no key was needed.

The conditions are fairly good. The grass had been cut but the clippings left all around. Moreover, animals had bored large holes in a number of places so care should be taken when walking around but overall, it is manageable for most people. The cemetery is large with around 200-300 stones many of which are faded and difficult to read. Perhaps about 10-15% are lying on the ground and were under the grass clippings and some dirt. With gloves, this was easy to remove. The earliest stones were >from the 1840s or 1850s.
60% or more of the stones were only in Hebrew but many contain the family name. As long as one can read Hebrew the people buried there are readily identifiable.

Vancsod, Hungary
The cemetery is located in the Reformed Church Cemetery. It is tiny and there are perhaps 6 graves >from the 1890s - 1940 in a very small area surrounded by an iron fence. The gate was unlocked but it is so small one can see all the graves without even entering.



ROMANIA

Arad Old Neolog Cemetery
The main entrance is not as listed above (Visinului Str., no. 23-25) but on Str Toporas near the corner of Str. Arcasilor, opposite a nursery school. The gates were unlocked during the hours it was supposed to be open so entry was easy. However, there were 2 dogs near the gates who barked loudly when approaching the gate. It turns out they are entirely harmless and friendly but it wasn?t until I found the caretaker?s house that I found this to be the case. Visitors should not be fearful.

The caretaker?s house is located at Visinului Str., no. 23-25, just to the right of the cemetery. A woman in her 60s lives there who only speaks Romanian. She called her son-in-law who came within 10 minutes to help me try and find the grave. The cemetery is in very good condition and large. There are maps posted in many locations containing section and row numbers. The man who helped me came out with a computer where he could search for a name and it came up with the same grave references as in Jewishgen. The issue is that those references are different to the sections on the cemetery map and this man had no clue how to find it either until he called someone else. In any case, if the Jewishgen or computer reference is Mijloc (meaning ?middle? in Romanian) know that this means Section K.

Baia Mare - Nagybanya
The entry on IAJGS seems to have been mixed with Baia Sprie, the town nearby.

Address is Strada Lebedei 27
Cemetery is at the end of the street to the right. There is a house on the premises lived in by an older woman whose late husband was the caretaker. She understands Hungarian but only speaks Romanian.
Facing the cemetery, the first house to the left is lived in by a couple in their 30s. The man speaks fluent English and is a member of the Faith Church of Romania. His father is the pastor and lives next door. They are big supporters of Jewish people and he would be very helpful as a translator should one need it to communicate with the caretaker on premises.

Cemetery is protected by tall stone fences and a dog (who was tied up). Condition is good with grass, foliage and trees well under control except in the corners. The area is large with perhaps 500 stones. 95%+ of stones are upright and there appears to be no vandalism. There is a lot of plastic litter thrown over the fence >from a neighboring apartment building. The biggest problem, as in most places is the fast deterioration of sandstone or limestone markers, many of which are now illegible and beyond repair. Some of the sandstone ones are fine but need some cleaning or light sanding to be able to read them.

We know that Baia Mare was a younger community in this region with Jews only permitted to live in mining towns somewhat after 1860. As a result, I did not see any stones >from before the 1870s. The majority (perhaps 60%) are in Hebrew only but even if in Hebrew, many of those at least give the surname of the person buried there.
If you are searching for specific graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Carei - Nagykaroly

The two cemeteries in Carei were the best kept I have ever seen in the Hungarian/Romanian countryside. The grass has been cut and there are no trees or vegetation growing anywhere. The maintenance of the grounds and the restoration of the stones in Soimului strada, makes the latter a model for any old cemetery in the world.

Note: Google maps has Soimului str. correctly but Str. Oburului is called Str. Cimitirului.

Caretaker: Lives in the house at Oburului 31 but the man who lives there now is Sanyi Varga, a man in his 40s.
He and his wife know well how to treat visitors offering them water to wash their hands at the end. However, their knowledge of the actual place is poor. Mr Varga insisted many times that the cemetery on Oborului Str. no. 31 is the old one but that is patently wrong. I informed him of that. The wife seems to know more and it leads me to believe that she may be the daughter of Szentmiklosy, the old caretaker.
They are native Hungarian speakers.

Both cemeteries are in very good condition but cemetery on Soimului is even better as at some point in the last 5 or 10 years, all the stones have been cleaned and are legible. It was incredibly easy to read every stone including those >from the 1820s. The older stones in the new cemetery have not been restored but are in good condition with 90%+ standing. Some of the sandstone ones have deteriorated badly and are illegible while some are fine but need some cleaning or light sanding to be able to read them.

The new cemetery on Oburului has a few graves >from the mid 1880s but most are of a later date. Many of them have some Latin characters but at least 40% are in Hebrew only. The layout is somewhat different to other cemeteries as men and women tend to be separated. It is rare to see a husband and wife next to each other although there are some instances of it >from the 1920s on.

The old cemetery on Soimului has a majority of stones in Hebrew only, probably 70%. As you walk in, those straight in front of you and directly ahead are newer graves >from the late 1800s on while to the right are those >from earlier periods, mostly 1810-1880s.

If you are searching for family graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Cermei / Cselmo

The cemetery is on the NW side of village as the original description says. A more exact location is that it is entered >from a small road on the right border of the Catholic cemetery and this loops behind it. Drive along the road for 200 meters and you will see the cemetery on the left.
Here is the link on Google Maps:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Cermei+317075,+Romania/@46.5543814,21.8395853,383m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x4745fcf80b429ee5:0x74b8086d9c2ce143!8m2!3d46.5466809!4d21.8422496

There is a gate that is closed by wire only put through a lock. One has to untie the wire after which it can be entered. There is no key required.
Walk across the small field and there is an entrance into the small cemetery of about 80-100 stones.
This cemetery has not been maintained and the bushes with thorns grow fairly high. Just about all of the stones are visible though and with appropriate gloves to move these branches can be viewed.
The back row are almost all Cohanim.
The earliest dates are >from the 1860s. Many stones are in Hebrew only.

Chisineu Cris / Kisjeno

Location is on Str. Garii (the main road) near the corner of Str. Prunlui, not on Prunului itself.
Cemetery keys are held with Mr. Petru Bika at Str. Prunului 3. Phone number is 077 172 8343 (international +40 77 172 8343). A refined man who refused to accept any money for opening the gate and waiting while I was there. His complaint was about the gypsies who stole the brass handles off the door.

This cemetery is small and kept in good condition. The grass has been cut and the fence is in tact. It has fruit trees and other agriculture being used on part of the land that has no tombstones. Chisineu Cris was a regional town and had a relatively large community and was the burial place for smaller surrounding communities. The earliest graves I found there were >from the late 1880s until the 1970s. There is no inventory of any other cemetery in the town but this is very unlikely. There must have been earlier burials but they have seemingly disappeared. My guess is that perhaps the cemetery was a lot larger at one point and was built over when the surrounding area was developed during communist times. Either that or there was another location elsewhere in town.

Mediesu Aurit - Aranyosmeggyes

I visited Mediesu Aurit 1 that is listed as being on Strada Garii. The address in inaccurate and it took a number of queries to find it. Strada Garii is the main road through town. The cemetery entrance is located on an unnamed side street and the cemetery cannot be seen >from the main road. As you are driving along Garii away >from the town center toward Route 19F, turn right on the first street after passing the Orthodox Church. Drive 50-100m and the entrance to this small cemetery is on the right. There is a small fence but no gate.

The maintenance of vegetation was good with almost every stone accessible. 80%+ of the stones were standing. Most were made >from sandstone and are difficult to read. Many will require some light cleaning solution to be read.
70% were in Hebrew only but of those, some contained the family name. Perhaps there were 80-100 stones.

I could not find Mediesu Aurit II and ran out of time given how long it took to find the first one.

Pincota/Pancota, Arad County
This cemetery is in the worst condition I have seen in a long while. The cemeteries in the south of Transylvania are in generally worse condition than those in Maramures or Satu Mare counties.

The gate to the cemetery is closed only with a wire and there is no key. The Jewish cemetery neighbors the other town cemeteries and the entrance is situated on Str Cimitirului very close to the corner of Str. Eroilor.
Half of the cemetery was sold by the Jewish community to the Pentecostal Christians and that area has been cleared and is well-maintained.
The old caretaker?s wife was looking after the cemetery but she died 4 years ago. Her daughter is named Ekaterina and lives on Soarului 6. Her phone number is +40 25 746 6980. She is happy to help but explains that it hasn?t been touched in over 4 years. She said that the Jewish community in Bucharest had offered 250 Lei per year (about $60) but that wasn?t enough for anyone to want to do the work. Workers need to maker 100 Lei per day (about $25) and this would take 2 men at least 2 days if not 3 plus there is the cost of fuel and supplies. Once cleared, annual maintenance would obviously take less time. There are many trees growing all over the cemetery that are full of thorns. Many of the gravestones are covered in thick ivy making it difficult to see the stones without getting scratched.

The cemetery is on a hill with those graves at the top the older ones, >from the 1820s onwards. The newest grave I saw there was >from the 1970s. There is one beautifully built ohel in the right corner but it is locked and the

Seini (Szinervaralja), Romania
Cemetery is moderately maintained. The front sections were fully accessible and only somewhat overgrown. The back section was not visible at all.
The entry is still protected, the fence intact and there does not appear to have been any vandalism since the last report.

The caretaker Eva, is an older woman of about 65-70 but appears in fit condition. She speaks fluent Hungarian and Romanian. She says she gets paid very little (or nothing) and is very welcoming of financial support >from visitors. Whoever has strong ancestral ties to this town should attempt to start planning for succession in maintenance as she will have 10 years at most left to do it on her own. Maybe one of her children will want to live in the house?

Vanatori / Vadasz, Arad County Romania
There are a few towns named Vanatori in Romania and this one doesn?t always come up on Google Maps. IAJGS has an entry for Vanatori in Arad county and this is the town. I drove around and asked a number of people where the Catholic Cemetery was but still had no success. I found the main cemetery to the west of the town but no one knew of any Jewish cemetery.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Reviews of visits to Hungarian and Transylvanian Cemeteries #hungary

michael_perl9@...
 

I visited a number of towns and cities in Eastern Hungary and Transylvania over the last month. I wrote updates/reviews for IAJGS but thought it would be of interest to the list as well. In many cases, the location descriptions available >from Mazsihisz or Fedrom are inaccurate or incomplete and I have given more specific locations.
I also visited Debrecen and Szekesfehervar but have nothing to add to what is already known.

Please scroll down to read the towns of interest.

The towns visited were:
Hungary:
Berettyoujfalu
Derecske
Hajdusamson
Puspokladany
Vancsod

Romania:
Arad Old Neolog
Baia Mare / Nagybanya
Carei / Nagykaroly
Cermei / Cselmo
Chisieneu Cris / Kisjeno
Mediesu Aurit / Aranyosmeggyes
Pincota/Pancota, Arad County
Seini / Szinervaralja
Vanatori / Vadasz, Arad County

HUNGARY

Berettyoujfalu, Hungary

I visited both cemeteries on Vagohid utca and Szabolcska utca and both are pitiful as I will describe below. The original entry says they are not maintained but this is untrue. The grass had been cut and the cemeteries have walls. Both gates were unlocked.

Vagohid utca is the newer cemetery and contains a small holocaust memorial. The gate was open. There is one ohel as well as a separate area for Cohanim. The men and women are not buried together. The pitiful part is that this cemetery has been pillaged and there are many visible bases where the stones have been taken. There are still many stones standing but a large percentage have disappeared at some point.

Szabadka utca has a gate with a lock but the gate was tied with wire into the lock. One need only untwist the wire to get in. This is the older of the two cemeteries and is slightly closer to the center of town. This was the most pitiful cemetery I have visited. The cemetery has perhaps 30 stones of which 10 are lying under grass or mud and most of the area is empty. It is smaller than the one on Vagoghid u. but one can imagine that this would have been fairly full for a newer one to be opened. Today one can see that almost all the stones have been stolen or destroyed. There is a well known story of someone coming with a truck in the early 1990s and stealing many stones. There are a few very old stones left, with one legible one >from 1824. There is one ohel that has been rebuilt on the site but it is unfinished and very poor quality construction. There are large dead branches and sections of trees lying about the property but the grass has been cut. Berettyoujfalu is a larger town and had a very old and sizable community so for one interested in family research, this was devastating to see.

Derecske
The exact address is on a dirt road named Hajnal utca (it is on Google Maps). As you are heading out of the village on Dozsa Gyorgy u., just as it turns into Konyari Ut, you turn right into Hajnal.
Here is a picture >from Google Maps:
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3500197,21.577002,3a,75y,179.57h,68.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sAxOyZQqVLZBkNdcu-XDTKw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Along the road, one passes the town?s Catholic cemetery on the left including the caretaker?s house. >from this house, keep driving for 600 ft (183 meters) to the grass driveway to get to the cemetery gate. On your left will be a large field and on the other side of that field you will see a large wall surrounding the Jewish cemetery. As you reach the end of the field, you will see a grass driveway on your left that is blocked by a makeshift gate made of logs. One needs to take the crosspiece out of the metal clasp and lift the gate to open it outwards. Then drive all the way down past another small cemetery on the right and the Jewish cemetery gate will be visible. It has a combination lock. On the metal pillar of the gate, two phone numbers are written which one can call to get the code.

This cemetery was in excellent condition. The grass and trees had been cut and at some point in the last 10 years, the fallen tombstones were re-erected on placed on new cement bases, even the broken ones.
Grave dates range >from the mid 1800s until the late 1940s and 60% are in Hebrew only. If one is looking for graves >from the 1800s, in just about all rural towns they are in Hebrew only so it is necessary to have someone who can read them quickly. Many of these stones do contain the family name though so as long as you can read Hebrew they are useful.

Hajdusamson

Location: Hajdusamson I is listed as being on Jokai utca. This is inaccurate. The cemetery is off Jokai ucta on Szeder utca. It is on the right hand side, about 1/3 of the way down the street and before you reach a children's playground. The playground has a water pump to wash your hands after visiting the cemetery.
The caretaker listed on this site, Istvan Deak has passed away. The cemetery is surrounded by a cement wall, not more than 20 years old and a locked gate. There is a combination lock on the gate and I believe the code is with the community in Debrecen. It is unclear who maintains it but it is well-kept.

The cemetery has been restored with all fallen stones having been cemented into a new base. The grounds have been fairly well maintained although the many trees on the property make this more complicated due to their seeds. I was able to get to all tombstones although some were cemented very close to the back wall and there are trees growing near the fence that have not been cut back enough.
Hajdusamson is a very old community but this cemetery is fairly new in that community's existence with stones starting >from the 1880s. There is one ohel on the property with 2 graves in it.
65% of the stones are in Hebrew only. If you are searching for family graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Hajdusamson II: The site is listed as being on Jokai utca 700 metres away. This is accurate but to be more precise, it is at the bend where Jokai utca ends and Janostavadulo begins. If driving on Jokai utca, it is located on the right hand side.
This cemetery is the exact opposite of Samson I. There is a wire fence with a gate but that gate is rusty and has no lock. I was able to get in and walk up the small hill to the cemetery but it is entirely overgrown with long grass and trees with thick thorns. It is a little smaller in size than the new cemetery but hard to judge the exact size given the overgrowth. There is a rabbi's tomb with a fence that is clearly visited as the long grass is trodden on towards this location. The rest is accessible only if wearing work gloves to push away the thorny branches. Many stones have sunk into the ground and could be rescued with some restoration work. There are 20-30 visible stones that I could see but it is very likely that many are hidden behind bushes and trees or have sunk underground.

Any stone that was visible was in Hebrew only.

Puspokladany, Hungary

The address given by the Mazshihisz excel spreadsheet is Hosszuhati ut and is somewhat accurate. However, this is not how the street is known on Google maps. Furthermore, the cemetery cannot be seen easily >from the road. It is on the road of all the town cemeteries named Eross Lajos u. Best thing is to type "Puspokladanyi temeto" into Google Maps. Drive along this road and go past the entrance to the main Christian cemetery. Keep driving and follow the fence line on the right. Follow the road around the bend. Once you reach the end of the last of the cemeteries along the fence, there is a dirt driveway that is not signposted which you turn right onto. In the distance one can see the concrete walls of the Jewish cemetery and keep driving towards it. There is a gate but it was wide open and no key was needed.

The conditions are fairly good. The grass had been cut but the clippings left all around. Moreover, animals had bored large holes in a number of places so care should be taken when walking around but overall, it is manageable for most people. The cemetery is large with around 200-300 stones many of which are faded and difficult to read. Perhaps about 10-15% are lying on the ground and were under the grass clippings and some dirt. With gloves, this was easy to remove. The earliest stones were >from the 1840s or 1850s.
60% or more of the stones were only in Hebrew but many contain the family name. As long as one can read Hebrew the people buried there are readily identifiable.

Vancsod, Hungary
The cemetery is located in the Reformed Church Cemetery. It is tiny and there are perhaps 6 graves >from the 1890s - 1940 in a very small area surrounded by an iron fence. The gate was unlocked but it is so small one can see all the graves without even entering.



ROMANIA

Arad Old Neolog Cemetery
The main entrance is not as listed above (Visinului Str., no. 23-25) but on Str Toporas near the corner of Str. Arcasilor, opposite a nursery school. The gates were unlocked during the hours it was supposed to be open so entry was easy. However, there were 2 dogs near the gates who barked loudly when approaching the gate. It turns out they are entirely harmless and friendly but it wasn?t until I found the caretaker?s house that I found this to be the case. Visitors should not be fearful.

The caretaker?s house is located at Visinului Str., no. 23-25, just to the right of the cemetery. A woman in her 60s lives there who only speaks Romanian. She called her son-in-law who came within 10 minutes to help me try and find the grave. The cemetery is in very good condition and large. There are maps posted in many locations containing section and row numbers. The man who helped me came out with a computer where he could search for a name and it came up with the same grave references as in Jewishgen. The issue is that those references are different to the sections on the cemetery map and this man had no clue how to find it either until he called someone else. In any case, if the Jewishgen or computer reference is Mijloc (meaning ?middle? in Romanian) know that this means Section K.

Baia Mare - Nagybanya
The entry on IAJGS seems to have been mixed with Baia Sprie, the town nearby.

Address is Strada Lebedei 27
Cemetery is at the end of the street to the right. There is a house on the premises lived in by an older woman whose late husband was the caretaker. She understands Hungarian but only speaks Romanian.
Facing the cemetery, the first house to the left is lived in by a couple in their 30s. The man speaks fluent English and is a member of the Faith Church of Romania. His father is the pastor and lives next door. They are big supporters of Jewish people and he would be very helpful as a translator should one need it to communicate with the caretaker on premises.

Cemetery is protected by tall stone fences and a dog (who was tied up). Condition is good with grass, foliage and trees well under control except in the corners. The area is large with perhaps 500 stones. 95%+ of stones are upright and there appears to be no vandalism. There is a lot of plastic litter thrown over the fence >from a neighboring apartment building. The biggest problem, as in most places is the fast deterioration of sandstone or limestone markers, many of which are now illegible and beyond repair. Some of the sandstone ones are fine but need some cleaning or light sanding to be able to read them.

We know that Baia Mare was a younger community in this region with Jews only permitted to live in mining towns somewhat after 1860. As a result, I did not see any stones >from before the 1870s. The majority (perhaps 60%) are in Hebrew only but even if in Hebrew, many of those at least give the surname of the person buried there.
If you are searching for specific graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Carei - Nagykaroly

The two cemeteries in Carei were the best kept I have ever seen in the Hungarian/Romanian countryside. The grass has been cut and there are no trees or vegetation growing anywhere. The maintenance of the grounds and the restoration of the stones in Soimului strada, makes the latter a model for any old cemetery in the world.

Note: Google maps has Soimului str. correctly but Str. Oburului is called Str. Cimitirului.

Caretaker: Lives in the house at Oburului 31 but the man who lives there now is Sanyi Varga, a man in his 40s.
He and his wife know well how to treat visitors offering them water to wash their hands at the end. However, their knowledge of the actual place is poor. Mr Varga insisted many times that the cemetery on Oborului Str. no. 31 is the old one but that is patently wrong. I informed him of that. The wife seems to know more and it leads me to believe that she may be the daughter of Szentmiklosy, the old caretaker.
They are native Hungarian speakers.

Both cemeteries are in very good condition but cemetery on Soimului is even better as at some point in the last 5 or 10 years, all the stones have been cleaned and are legible. It was incredibly easy to read every stone including those >from the 1820s. The older stones in the new cemetery have not been restored but are in good condition with 90%+ standing. Some of the sandstone ones have deteriorated badly and are illegible while some are fine but need some cleaning or light sanding to be able to read them.

The new cemetery on Oburului has a few graves >from the mid 1880s but most are of a later date. Many of them have some Latin characters but at least 40% are in Hebrew only. The layout is somewhat different to other cemeteries as men and women tend to be separated. It is rare to see a husband and wife next to each other although there are some instances of it >from the 1920s on.

The old cemetery on Soimului has a majority of stones in Hebrew only, probably 70%. As you walk in, those straight in front of you and directly ahead are newer graves >from the late 1800s on while to the right are those >from earlier periods, mostly 1810-1880s.

If you are searching for family graves, it is highly advisable to have someone in your party who is able to read and decipher Hebrew tombstones.

Cermei / Cselmo

The cemetery is on the NW side of village as the original description says. A more exact location is that it is entered >from a small road on the right border of the Catholic cemetery and this loops behind it. Drive along the road for 200 meters and you will see the cemetery on the left.
Here is the link on Google Maps:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Cermei+317075,+Romania/@46.5543814,21.8395853,383m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x4745fcf80b429ee5:0x74b8086d9c2ce143!8m2!3d46.5466809!4d21.8422496

There is a gate that is closed by wire only put through a lock. One has to untie the wire after which it can be entered. There is no key required.
Walk across the small field and there is an entrance into the small cemetery of about 80-100 stones.
This cemetery has not been maintained and the bushes with thorns grow fairly high. Just about all of the stones are visible though and with appropriate gloves to move these branches can be viewed.
The back row are almost all Cohanim.
The earliest dates are >from the 1860s. Many stones are in Hebrew only.

Chisineu Cris / Kisjeno

Location is on Str. Garii (the main road) near the corner of Str. Prunlui, not on Prunului itself.
Cemetery keys are held with Mr. Petru Bika at Str. Prunului 3. Phone number is 077 172 8343 (international +40 77 172 8343). A refined man who refused to accept any money for opening the gate and waiting while I was there. His complaint was about the gypsies who stole the brass handles off the door.

This cemetery is small and kept in good condition. The grass has been cut and the fence is in tact. It has fruit trees and other agriculture being used on part of the land that has no tombstones. Chisineu Cris was a regional town and had a relatively large community and was the burial place for smaller surrounding communities. The earliest graves I found there were >from the late 1880s until the 1970s. There is no inventory of any other cemetery in the town but this is very unlikely. There must have been earlier burials but they have seemingly disappeared. My guess is that perhaps the cemetery was a lot larger at one point and was built over when the surrounding area was developed during communist times. Either that or there was another location elsewhere in town.

Mediesu Aurit - Aranyosmeggyes

I visited Mediesu Aurit 1 that is listed as being on Strada Garii. The address in inaccurate and it took a number of queries to find it. Strada Garii is the main road through town. The cemetery entrance is located on an unnamed side street and the cemetery cannot be seen >from the main road. As you are driving along Garii away >from the town center toward Route 19F, turn right on the first street after passing the Orthodox Church. Drive 50-100m and the entrance to this small cemetery is on the right. There is a small fence but no gate.

The maintenance of vegetation was good with almost every stone accessible. 80%+ of the stones were standing. Most were made >from sandstone and are difficult to read. Many will require some light cleaning solution to be read.
70% were in Hebrew only but of those, some contained the family name. Perhaps there were 80-100 stones.

I could not find Mediesu Aurit II and ran out of time given how long it took to find the first one.

Pincota/Pancota, Arad County
This cemetery is in the worst condition I have seen in a long while. The cemeteries in the south of Transylvania are in generally worse condition than those in Maramures or Satu Mare counties.

The gate to the cemetery is closed only with a wire and there is no key. The Jewish cemetery neighbors the other town cemeteries and the entrance is situated on Str Cimitirului very close to the corner of Str. Eroilor.
Half of the cemetery was sold by the Jewish community to the Pentecostal Christians and that area has been cleared and is well-maintained.
The old caretaker?s wife was looking after the cemetery but she died 4 years ago. Her daughter is named Ekaterina and lives on Soarului 6. Her phone number is +40 25 746 6980. She is happy to help but explains that it hasn?t been touched in over 4 years. She said that the Jewish community in Bucharest had offered 250 Lei per year (about $60) but that wasn?t enough for anyone to want to do the work. Workers need to maker 100 Lei per day (about $25) and this would take 2 men at least 2 days if not 3 plus there is the cost of fuel and supplies. Once cleared, annual maintenance would obviously take less time. There are many trees growing all over the cemetery that are full of thorns. Many of the gravestones are covered in thick ivy making it difficult to see the stones without getting scratched.

The cemetery is on a hill with those graves at the top the older ones, >from the 1820s onwards. The newest grave I saw there was >from the 1970s. There is one beautifully built ohel in the right corner but it is locked and the

Seini (Szinervaralja), Romania
Cemetery is moderately maintained. The front sections were fully accessible and only somewhat overgrown. The back section was not visible at all.
The entry is still protected, the fence intact and there does not appear to have been any vandalism since the last report.

The caretaker Eva, is an older woman of about 65-70 but appears in fit condition. She speaks fluent Hungarian and Romanian. She says she gets paid very little (or nothing) and is very welcoming of financial support >from visitors. Whoever has strong ancestral ties to this town should attempt to start planning for succession in maintenance as she will have 10 years at most left to do it on her own. Maybe one of her children will want to live in the house?

Vanatori / Vadasz, Arad County Romania
There are a few towns named Vanatori in Romania and this one doesn?t always come up on Google Maps. IAJGS has an entry for Vanatori in Arad county and this is the town. I drove around and asked a number of people where the Catholic Cemetery was but still had no success. I found the main cemetery to the west of the town but no one knew of any Jewish cemetery.


Isidor Kohn/Pap #hungary

Traude Triebel
 

Dr.med.Isidor PAP, born 7 september 1879 in Tihany, parents:Ignaz Kohn =
and
Josefine Stern; Isidor changed his name to Pap 1898. at least he had a
brother Zoltan,(also Pap) born 1885 also in Tihany, married to Maria =
Kuthy
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6SPS-X9H?i=3D78&cc=3D145=
2460&pe
rsonaUrl=3D%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AQLLC-QB2C&fbclid=3DIwAR1GbSBo-KrRV=
QrzpDUr
PyTwVMJNXA4xoeMAewlkezalSFV4-dEOXvOvXUE and sister Hermine born 1874,
married to Schwarz Ignac
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DY91-CS?i=3D203&cc=3D145=
2460&pe
rsonaUrl=3D%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AQPRT-48QH&fbclid=3DIwAR0YIbcktiNXj=
T1COUxO
5jHrkHfLCAe9PbRSMWehFtfm-Ums0DrSR645H7Q. Isidor was "Medizinalrat" in
Eisenstadt before 1923 up to 1938. he could flee to Italy, where he did
suicide. he was married to unknown and had a daughter, name unknown. she
escaped to England (found in the book "das Eisenst=E4dter Ghetto" >from =
Josef
Klampfer. Can anyone help to find out place and death for Isisdor and =
the
fate for Isidor`s wife and daughter? in this newspaper could be a =
marriage
announcement for Isidor (do not read romanian)
https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/44701970.pdf?fbclid=3DIwAR0wb1pkbIxjucb53=
nNovP
ahFFm0QEGDFN-3OWssSEbI99f8Ul1oLR1QHN8 page 3, left column

Traude Triebel
A-2700 Wr.Neustadt

20881 - 20900 of 658043