Date   

JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lodz #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lodz #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records >from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census
and vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lithuania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records >from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census
and vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lithuania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JRI Poland #Poland JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #ciechanow #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 #ciechanow #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Early-Bird Conference Discount Ends Thursday! #ciechanow #poland

IAJGS Conference Chairs
 

Even if you have already registered, please forward this message to others
who you think might be interested in attending the conference.

--- Early-Bird Discount Ends Thursday

Early-bird registration for the full Conference at the discounted price of
$325 ends at 11:59 pm CDT (GMT-5), Thursday, May 9, 2019. If you plan to
register for the conference, you should do so promptly to save $50 per
registration.

You can decide later about the extra Conference activities, such as
Computer Workshops, Breakfasts with the Experts, SIG Luncheons, the Gala
Banquet, the Reception at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and the Cemetery
Tours.

--- Hotel Reservations

Many people took advantage of the opportunity that we announced five
months ago to reserve rooms at the Conference hotel at a special rate
(www.hotel.iajgs2019.org). Now that more than 500 people have already
registered for the Conference, the Hilton has reached capacity. (Since
some people are releasing rooms -- which, until July 8, return to our pool
-- it is worth checking back with the Hilton >from time to time to see if
rooms have become available.)

To help people find other convenient places to stay at special Conference
rates, we have begun to open up overflow hotels
(www.overflow.iajgs2019.org). Currently, there are two -- the Marriott
(www.marriott.iajgs2019.org) and the Westin (www.westin.iajgs2019.org) --
both of which have small blocks of rooms for the Conference. As the Hilton
did several times as our block filled up, the other hotels have been
adding rooms. So if you find that you cannot get a room at the Conference
rate, try again.

We are very confident that everyone who attends the Conference will be
able to find a suitable hotel room. If you would like to share a room,
contact the Roommate Coordinator at roommates@....

--- Program Schedule

The Program and Schedule (www.program.iajgs2019.org) for the Conference
was first announced a couple of weeks ago. A number of further adjustments
have been required since then, but the schedule is now almost completely
settled, so you can make your plans.

--- Program Overview

The main Conference will start Sunday morning at 10:15 with the first of
some 184 lecture presentations among more than 300 activities. Sunday will
include the popular SHARE Fair, and the Exhibit Hall will open.

On Sunday afternoon at 2:45, our Keynote Speaker, Daniel Goldmark,
Director of the Center for Popular Music Studies at Case Western Reserve
University, will describe how Jews contributed to the evolution of rock
and roll. That will prepare us for the Sunday evening reception at the
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, just a few blocks >from the hotel. The "Rock
Hall" will be open exclusively for us, and heavy (kosher) hors d'oeuvres
will be served.

In addition to the lectures, there will be nine SIG luncheons during the
week and 11 "Breakfasts with the Experts" that provide the opportunity to
sit down in a small group (maximum 25) with top experts in many facets of
Jewish genealogy.

The program on Sunday through Wednesday will kick off with workshops for
beginners (and those who feel that their skills need some refreshing).
They will be led by certified genealogist Dr. Rhoda Miller, Ed.D., who
will provide suggestions on how to get started, where to find resources,
and how to organize what you are doing. Dr. Miller will also cover how to
get the most out of the Conference for those attending their first one.

There are over 35 "Birds of a Feather" (BOF) meetings along with
additional SIG meetings. Eleven computer workshops will be offered,
limited to 25 attendees each. Participants will need to bring a laptop
computer with Internet access.

Evening sessions will include the annual JewishGen gathering, which will
introduce some major changes coming at that organization. Subsequent
evenings will feature the Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, the ever
popular "Jewpardy!" game show night, and the Gala Banquet, featuring
Michael Krasny, well known to NPR and KQED-FM San Francisco listeners.
Krasny, a native Clevelander, will discuss the evolution of Jewish humor,
the subject of his most recent book "Let There Be Laughter".

--- Audio Recordings with Slides

With such a full program -- as many as nine simultaneous activities -- you
might have a hard time attending all the sessions you would like to. We
have a solution for that problem! As at previous conferences in the U.S.,
the superb Fleetwood audio recordings (www.audio.iajgs2019.org) will be
offered. Almost all sessions are recorded, and most of the recordings have
a high quality audio track synchronized with a video track showing images
of the presenters' slides.

The full package of audio recordings can be pre-ordered on the online
registration form at a substantial discount.

Jay Sage
Communications Chair


JewishGen Updates Holocaust Database #poland #ciechanow

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen.org is pleased to announce the completion of its most recent
update to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ The database now
includes more than 2.75 million records >from approximately 200 component
databases.

All component databases (individual data sets) have a project introduction.
The introduction gives you further information about the historical
background of the data, location of the original source document, fields
used in the database, translation aides when applicable and acknowledgments
to those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation of
the data set.

A listing of each of the component databases can be found by scrolling down
the main search page. All data can be searched in one database-wide search
from the Holocaust Database home page.
The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships with
other organizations and receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the
preservation and "publishing" of these pieces.

Selected new additions include:

Czudec, Poland - Residents Lists, Birth and Death Records: An index
of 1,215 Jewish residents >from 1940-1942, and 14 birth and death records.
Rzeszow, Poland - Registration, ID Cards, and Marriage Certificates:
101 Registration and ID cards >from 1919-1942, and 134 Marriage records from
1939-1942
Nowy Sacz, Poland - Forced Labor and Punishment Book Listings: An
index of 1,345 Jews forced to report for work in the Stadtische Werkstatten
(Municipal Workshops) in 1942, and an index of 1,883 Jews who received
punishments for various alleged offenses between January 1940 and September
1942.
Mielec, Poland - Jewish Residents: 2,320 inhabitants of Mielec,
Poland, dated August 15, 1940.
Lublin, Poland - Seized Property Cards: 5,081 records of confiscated
Jewish property in the Lublin area.
Szeged, Hungary - Deportations and Survivors: Survivors of the three
transports that liquidated the town and those that survived after the war.
More than 7,000 records.
Medzilaborce, Slovakia - Census List: Names of family members taken
from the folder named 'Verzeichniss der Juden in Medzilaborce' found at
Jewish Community office in Kosice.
Bekescsaba, Hungary - Victims: Holocaust victims >from two different
death registers 1941 - 1945.
Gross Rosen Camp Transport Records: Transport list of Jews
transported to Gross Rosen >from south Belgium and northern France.
Nisko, Poland - Transport Lists: Jews >from Czechoslovakia and
Austria, sent >from Vienna in October 1939 to a rural marshy area near Nisko,
where they were to establish a camp.
Reichsvereinigung - Update. The collection now includes more than
23,000 records of German Jews >from cards where the family name begins with
the letters A-R.
Kovno Cemetery File - Update. Updated and corrected listings from
the Viliampole Chevra Kadisha register for those who died in the Kovno
Ghetto between 18 August 1941 and 31 December 1943
Hachshara in Havelberg - 124 members of this Zionist youth
organization in Havelberg, Saxony-Anhalt.
German Mischlingen in Nazi Germany: Sitzensdorf: 203 mixed-race
forced laborers at Sitzendorf concentration camp in Thuringia.
Wallenberg Passport Records - Update: Updated file containing 5,642
Hungarian Jews who received a protective document >from the Swedish embassy.
Parschnitz Forced Labor Transport: 910 female prisoners at
Parschnitz forced-labor camp, October 1944.
Leova Mayoral Election List: 1,929 citizens of Leova, Moldova
registered to vote in the 1937 election for mayor.

To see descriptions of all the new and pre-existing component databases,
please visit: https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have
assisted in making this data available to you. Their names are listed in
the individual project introductions.

If you are interested in assisting data entry or have a database at you
think would be appropriate for the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please
contact me directly at NAltman@...

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
May 2019


Congratulations & Welcome to Nancy Siegel #ciechanow #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

In an effort to provide more consistent updates about new additions to
our collection, status of projects, achievements, and other items of
interest, Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA) has volunteered to serve as
our Communications Coordinator. In this capacity, Nancy will be
working directly with staff and members of the senior research team to
stay apprised of project updates and to prepare updates on an ongoing
basis.

Many of you already know Nancy J. Siegel >from her role overseeing the
JewishGen Success Stories and preparing periodic newsletters, and we
congratulate her, and thank her, for assuming this additional level of
responsibility.

Please be on the lookout for news and updates shortly.

All the best,

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@...

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


#Ciechanow #Poland Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #poland #ciechanow

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


#Ciechanow #Poland Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 #ciechanow #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


#Ciechanow #Poland Early-Bird Conference Discount Ends Thursday! #ciechanow #poland

IAJGS Conference Chairs
 

Even if you have already registered, please forward this message to others
who you think might be interested in attending the conference.

--- Early-Bird Discount Ends Thursday

Early-bird registration for the full Conference at the discounted price of
$325 ends at 11:59 pm CDT (GMT-5), Thursday, May 9, 2019. If you plan to
register for the conference, you should do so promptly to save $50 per
registration.

You can decide later about the extra Conference activities, such as
Computer Workshops, Breakfasts with the Experts, SIG Luncheons, the Gala
Banquet, the Reception at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and the Cemetery
Tours.

--- Hotel Reservations

Many people took advantage of the opportunity that we announced five
months ago to reserve rooms at the Conference hotel at a special rate
(www.hotel.iajgs2019.org). Now that more than 500 people have already
registered for the Conference, the Hilton has reached capacity. (Since
some people are releasing rooms -- which, until July 8, return to our pool
-- it is worth checking back with the Hilton >from time to time to see if
rooms have become available.)

To help people find other convenient places to stay at special Conference
rates, we have begun to open up overflow hotels
(www.overflow.iajgs2019.org). Currently, there are two -- the Marriott
(www.marriott.iajgs2019.org) and the Westin (www.westin.iajgs2019.org) --
both of which have small blocks of rooms for the Conference. As the Hilton
did several times as our block filled up, the other hotels have been
adding rooms. So if you find that you cannot get a room at the Conference
rate, try again.

We are very confident that everyone who attends the Conference will be
able to find a suitable hotel room. If you would like to share a room,
contact the Roommate Coordinator at roommates@....

--- Program Schedule

The Program and Schedule (www.program.iajgs2019.org) for the Conference
was first announced a couple of weeks ago. A number of further adjustments
have been required since then, but the schedule is now almost completely
settled, so you can make your plans.

--- Program Overview

The main Conference will start Sunday morning at 10:15 with the first of
some 184 lecture presentations among more than 300 activities. Sunday will
include the popular SHARE Fair, and the Exhibit Hall will open.

On Sunday afternoon at 2:45, our Keynote Speaker, Daniel Goldmark,
Director of the Center for Popular Music Studies at Case Western Reserve
University, will describe how Jews contributed to the evolution of rock
and roll. That will prepare us for the Sunday evening reception at the
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, just a few blocks >from the hotel. The "Rock
Hall" will be open exclusively for us, and heavy (kosher) hors d'oeuvres
will be served.

In addition to the lectures, there will be nine SIG luncheons during the
week and 11 "Breakfasts with the Experts" that provide the opportunity to
sit down in a small group (maximum 25) with top experts in many facets of
Jewish genealogy.

The program on Sunday through Wednesday will kick off with workshops for
beginners (and those who feel that their skills need some refreshing).
They will be led by certified genealogist Dr. Rhoda Miller, Ed.D., who
will provide suggestions on how to get started, where to find resources,
and how to organize what you are doing. Dr. Miller will also cover how to
get the most out of the Conference for those attending their first one.

There are over 35 "Birds of a Feather" (BOF) meetings along with
additional SIG meetings. Eleven computer workshops will be offered,
limited to 25 attendees each. Participants will need to bring a laptop
computer with Internet access.

Evening sessions will include the annual JewishGen gathering, which will
introduce some major changes coming at that organization. Subsequent
evenings will feature the Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, the ever
popular "Jewpardy!" game show night, and the Gala Banquet, featuring
Michael Krasny, well known to NPR and KQED-FM San Francisco listeners.
Krasny, a native Clevelander, will discuss the evolution of Jewish humor,
the subject of his most recent book "Let There Be Laughter".

--- Audio Recordings with Slides

With such a full program -- as many as nine simultaneous activities -- you
might have a hard time attending all the sessions you would like to. We
have a solution for that problem! As at previous conferences in the U.S.,
the superb Fleetwood audio recordings (www.audio.iajgs2019.org) will be
offered. Almost all sessions are recorded, and most of the recordings have
a high quality audio track synchronized with a video track showing images
of the presenters' slides.

The full package of audio recordings can be pre-ordered on the online
registration form at a substantial discount.

Jay Sage
Communications Chair


#Ciechanow #Poland JewishGen Updates Holocaust Database #ciechanow #poland

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen.org is pleased to announce the completion of its most recent
update to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ The database now
includes more than 2.75 million records >from approximately 200 component
databases.

All component databases (individual data sets) have a project introduction.
The introduction gives you further information about the historical
background of the data, location of the original source document, fields
used in the database, translation aides when applicable and acknowledgments
to those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation of
the data set.

A listing of each of the component databases can be found by scrolling down
the main search page. All data can be searched in one database-wide search
from the Holocaust Database home page.
The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships with
other organizations and receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the
preservation and "publishing" of these pieces.

Selected new additions include:

Czudec, Poland - Residents Lists, Birth and Death Records: An index
of 1,215 Jewish residents >from 1940-1942, and 14 birth and death records.
Rzeszow, Poland - Registration, ID Cards, and Marriage Certificates:
101 Registration and ID cards >from 1919-1942, and 134 Marriage records from
1939-1942
Nowy Sacz, Poland - Forced Labor and Punishment Book Listings: An
index of 1,345 Jews forced to report for work in the Stadtische Werkstatten
(Municipal Workshops) in 1942, and an index of 1,883 Jews who received
punishments for various alleged offenses between January 1940 and September
1942.
Mielec, Poland - Jewish Residents: 2,320 inhabitants of Mielec,
Poland, dated August 15, 1940.
Lublin, Poland - Seized Property Cards: 5,081 records of confiscated
Jewish property in the Lublin area.
Szeged, Hungary - Deportations and Survivors: Survivors of the three
transports that liquidated the town and those that survived after the war.
More than 7,000 records.
Medzilaborce, Slovakia - Census List: Names of family members taken
from the folder named 'Verzeichniss der Juden in Medzilaborce' found at
Jewish Community office in Kosice.
Bekescsaba, Hungary - Victims: Holocaust victims >from two different
death registers 1941 - 1945.
Gross Rosen Camp Transport Records: Transport list of Jews
transported to Gross Rosen >from south Belgium and northern France.
Nisko, Poland - Transport Lists: Jews >from Czechoslovakia and
Austria, sent >from Vienna in October 1939 to a rural marshy area near Nisko,
where they were to establish a camp.
Reichsvereinigung - Update. The collection now includes more than
23,000 records of German Jews >from cards where the family name begins with
the letters A-R.
Kovno Cemetery File - Update. Updated and corrected listings from
the Viliampole Chevra Kadisha register for those who died in the Kovno
Ghetto between 18 August 1941 and 31 December 1943
Hachshara in Havelberg - 124 members of this Zionist youth
organization in Havelberg, Saxony-Anhalt.
German Mischlingen in Nazi Germany: Sitzensdorf: 203 mixed-race
forced laborers at Sitzendorf concentration camp in Thuringia.
Wallenberg Passport Records - Update: Updated file containing 5,642
Hungarian Jews who received a protective document >from the Swedish embassy.
Parschnitz Forced Labor Transport: 910 female prisoners at
Parschnitz forced-labor camp, October 1944.
Leova Mayoral Election List: 1,929 citizens of Leova, Moldova
registered to vote in the 1937 election for mayor.

To see descriptions of all the new and pre-existing component databases,
please visit: https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have
assisted in making this data available to you. Their names are listed in
the individual project introductions.

If you are interested in assisting data entry or have a database at you
think would be appropriate for the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please
contact me directly at NAltman@...

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
May 2019