Date   

DELEVANTE Family in Morocco, Algeria and England #general

Charles Fuller <charles.fuller@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching the DELEVANTE surname in England and there is one
particular individual whom I would like to trace backwards.

Background information:
The DELEVANTE surname is extremely rare in England - there are only 166
births, marriages and deaths recorded in England and Wales between 1837
and 1900 even when including the 16 different ways the surname is
spelled. A very small number of individuals/families appear to have
migrated to the London area in the very late 1700s or early 1800s. All
of these immigrants seem to have come >from what is now Algeria or
Morocco. Most of the families adopted the Christian faith.

Help request:
I would like to trace Prosper DELEVANTE or DE LEVANTE:
- He married in Norfolk, England on the 14th. March 1819 (17 Adar 5579)
at a Church of England church.
- The 1851 census return states that he was born in Algiers.
- There is a Church of England baptism record for him which states that
he was born on the 16th. July 1786 (20 Tamuz 5546) and that he was a son
of Joseph and Dinah. Joseph is described as a Rabbi, of Mogador, Morocco.
- Unfortunately the English immigration records for the early 1800s have
been destroyed so there's no help there.

Can anyone suggest what the original names might have been, and if there
is a way to identify his parents?

(Whilst I can cope with Latin and several modern European languages, I
have absolutely no knowledge of Hebrew and similar languages. Since
Delevante means "of the Levant", I suspect all of the names have been
completely Anglicised.)

Thank you,

Charles Fuller.

PS: If anyone else is researching this surname, I am happy to pass on
all of the information I have found so far.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DELEVANTE Family in Morocco, Algeria and England #general

Charles Fuller <charles.fuller@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching the DELEVANTE surname in England and there is one
particular individual whom I would like to trace backwards.

Background information:
The DELEVANTE surname is extremely rare in England - there are only 166
births, marriages and deaths recorded in England and Wales between 1837
and 1900 even when including the 16 different ways the surname is
spelled. A very small number of individuals/families appear to have
migrated to the London area in the very late 1700s or early 1800s. All
of these immigrants seem to have come >from what is now Algeria or
Morocco. Most of the families adopted the Christian faith.

Help request:
I would like to trace Prosper DELEVANTE or DE LEVANTE:
- He married in Norfolk, England on the 14th. March 1819 (17 Adar 5579)
at a Church of England church.
- The 1851 census return states that he was born in Algiers.
- There is a Church of England baptism record for him which states that
he was born on the 16th. July 1786 (20 Tamuz 5546) and that he was a son
of Joseph and Dinah. Joseph is described as a Rabbi, of Mogador, Morocco.
- Unfortunately the English immigration records for the early 1800s have
been destroyed so there's no help there.

Can anyone suggest what the original names might have been, and if there
is a way to identify his parents?

(Whilst I can cope with Latin and several modern European languages, I
have absolutely no knowledge of Hebrew and similar languages. Since
Delevante means "of the Levant", I suspect all of the names have been
completely Anglicised.)

Thank you,

Charles Fuller.

PS: If anyone else is researching this surname, I am happy to pass on
all of the information I have found so far.


Re: Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Bernard Weill
 

Menachem Mendel is a very common conjunction of two names, in fact, used to
name many Lubavitcher males. It is no different than
Tzvi Hersh
Aryeh Leib
Zev Volf
Yitzchok Eizek

And many more that are not coming to mind right now. The question that should
be asked is what is the meaning of Mendel.

Bernard Weill

On 28 Apr 2019 21:56:21 -0700, Dahn Cukier photograve99@... wrote:

I don't know if this will be answered, but I have come
across a tombstone where the name of
the deceased is "Menachem Mendal". The
entry in the local histories calls the person "Mendal".

Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.
Why would there be different names? Is Menachem an honorary
such as Mister, Doctor, etc.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Bernard Weill
 

Menachem Mendel is a very common conjunction of two names, in fact, used to
name many Lubavitcher males. It is no different than
Tzvi Hersh
Aryeh Leib
Zev Volf
Yitzchok Eizek

And many more that are not coming to mind right now. The question that should
be asked is what is the meaning of Mendel.

Bernard Weill

On 28 Apr 2019 21:56:21 -0700, Dahn Cukier photograve99@... wrote:

I don't know if this will be answered, but I have come
across a tombstone where the name of
the deceased is "Menachem Mendal". The
entry in the local histories calls the person "Mendal".

Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.
Why would there be different names? Is Menachem an honorary
such as Mister, Doctor, etc.


Viewmate - Translation from Russian to English #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Dear Genners,
I have posted two vital records in Russian for which I would appreciate a
translation to English. They are records >from Kaluszyn in Poland. Please
provide all important genealogical details such as family names, places,
dates etc.

They are on Viewmate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73040
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73039

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you so much in advance.

Ingrid Rockberger
Co- Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association.

Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz and Lodz,Poland, KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland,
LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland, MONKA: Sokolow Podlaski, Poland, SCZNAJDER,
Kozow Lacki, Poland.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate - Translation from Russian to English #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Dear Genners,
I have posted two vital records in Russian for which I would appreciate a
translation to English. They are records >from Kaluszyn in Poland. Please
provide all important genealogical details such as family names, places,
dates etc.

They are on Viewmate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73040
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73039

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you so much in advance.

Ingrid Rockberger
Co- Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association.

Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz and Lodz,Poland, KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland,
LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland, MONKA: Sokolow Podlaski, Poland, SCZNAJDER,
Kozow Lacki, Poland.


How do I obtain 1921 birth certificate from Dortmund, Germany? #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

I am trying to find how to obtain the birth certificate for my Uncle Herman
(Hermann) Klinger born November 11, 1921 in Dortmund, Germany.

Thank you.

Debby Painter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How do I obtain 1921 birth certificate from Dortmund, Germany? #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

I am trying to find how to obtain the birth certificate for my Uncle Herman
(Hermann) Klinger born November 11, 1921 in Dortmund, Germany.

Thank you.

Debby Painter


Viewmate help #ukraine

rchernia@...
 

Hello,

I have submitted four images to Viewmate? : two are Polish death notices
written in Russian for my grandmother's grandfather Shimon Wolf ZAJDLER??
two because I cannot read written Russian and don't know which (if either)
is the correct one. I'm hoping the translation will help me determine
which is the correct one.

The other two are >from the 1897 Russian census, >from the Vinnytsia
region, for Abraham SHKOLNIK. Again, I'm hoping that the details in the
census will help me determine if this is my husband's great grandfather
and his family.

I'm writing this now because I won't have easy access to a computer
keyboard for about a month once the images are approved for posting.

With thanks,
Ruth


Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ of London, England, 81odz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/LANDAU of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Rak, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICKER of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Viewmate help #ukraine

rchernia@...
 

Hello,

I have submitted four images to Viewmate? : two are Polish death notices
written in Russian for my grandmother's grandfather Shimon Wolf ZAJDLER??
two because I cannot read written Russian and don't know which (if either)
is the correct one. I'm hoping the translation will help me determine
which is the correct one.

The other two are >from the 1897 Russian census, >from the Vinnytsia
region, for Abraham SHKOLNIK. Again, I'm hoping that the details in the
census will help me determine if this is my husband's great grandfather
and his family.

I'm writing this now because I won't have easy access to a computer
keyboard for about a month once the images are approved for posting.

With thanks,
Ruth


Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ of London, England, 81odz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/LANDAU of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Rak, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICKER of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine


Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Dahn Cukier
 

Hello,

I don't know if this will be answered, but I have come
across a tombstone where the name of
the deceased is "Menachem Mendal". The
entry in the local histories calls the person "Mendal".

Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.
Why would there be different names? Is Menachem an honorary
such as Mister, Doctor, etc.

Dahn Cukierjewis


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Dahn Cukier
 

Hello,

I don't know if this will be answered, but I have come
across a tombstone where the name of
the deceased is "Menachem Mendal". The
entry in the local histories calls the person "Mendal".

Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.
Why would there be different names? Is Menachem an honorary
such as Mister, Doctor, etc.

Dahn Cukierjewis


JGSGW May 5, 2019 Meeting & Program Announcement #general

N. Kotz
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Washington (JGSGW) will present
The Wedding Photo with Dan A. Oren, M.D., taking place at the B'nai Israel
Congregation in Rockville, Maryland, on Sunday, May 5, 2019.

1:00 PM - Schmooze and Maven Tables
1:30 PM - Program Meeting

The Wedding Photo is a collection of genealogical adventure-hunting
stories culminating in meaningful successes. A visit to an abandoned
Polish Jewish cemetery in 1993 launches a 20-year search to solve the
mystery of "Who is Buried in Sarah's Tomb?" A visit with a cousin
unearths a breathtaking photo of a Berlin family wedding >from 1926 and
leads to discovering their unimaginable post-wedding history. An
archivist in Prague discovers a secret uncle whose life takes the
reader >from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to the Vatican.
A memoir by Philip Roth shocks a daughter into unlocking a father's
concealed past. In this talk, Dr. Dan Oren will share some of these
adventures and his research strategy, as applicable in genealogy as it
is in doing historical or scientific research, that open new worlds of
understanding.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dan A. Oren, M.D., associate professor
of psychiatry (adjunct) at Yale University has worked for thirty years
as a psychiatrist and faculty member at Yale and has been Visiting
Professor of Physiology at the University of Rzeszów, Poland. He is a
former research fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health.
Oren's prior books are: Joining The Club: A History of Jews and Yale
and How to Beat Jet Lag: A Practical Guide for Air Travelers. He is
author or co-author of numerous scientific articles. His scientific
interest centers on the mechanism of light's antidepressant effects in
treating Seasonal Affective Disorder. He is married to artist Jeanette
Kuvin Oren, and has two children and one grandchild. He has been
tracing his genealogy for more than forty years.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy:
Meetings and most events are free to JGSGW members. Non-members may
attend for a fee of $5. If they decide to join JGSGW at the meeting or
event, the $5 will be applied toward membership. Members who require
personal assistance due to a health condition or disability may bring
an assistant at no charge.

Nancy C. Kotz
VP Communications, JGSGW
http://www.jgsgw.org


May 6, 2019 - Celebrate Jewish-American Heritage Month at the Library of Congress #general

N. Kotz
 

In observance of Jewish American Heritage Month, and in cooperation
with the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, Dr. Dan A.
Oren will present on his book titled "Joining the Club: A History of
Jews and Yale."

Between the 1920s and early 1960s, Yale had an unwritten 10% quota on
Jewish students. Beginning in 1809 there were Jewish students at Yale
however they were few in number and easily incorporated into a
generally tolerant community. But by the 1920s 10% of undergrads were
Jewish and the Jewish applicant pool was expanding. Yale did not want
to be seen as a Jewish college and thus loose the patronage of the
upper class to Harvard.

Dr. Oren tells the story of Jews at Yale very comprehensively and
expands his writing to include philosophical issues related to racial
and ethnic groups who continue to feel excluded by universities who
see a "balanced" class as their goal.

Details are available at
https://www.loc.gov/item/event-394953/joining-the-club-a-history-of-jews-and-yale/2019-05-06/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://tinyurl.com/yxv5o3sm ]

Nancy C. Kotz
VP Communications, JGSGW
http://www.jgsgw.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW May 5, 2019 Meeting & Program Announcement #general

N. Kotz
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Washington (JGSGW) will present
The Wedding Photo with Dan A. Oren, M.D., taking place at the B'nai Israel
Congregation in Rockville, Maryland, on Sunday, May 5, 2019.

1:00 PM - Schmooze and Maven Tables
1:30 PM - Program Meeting

The Wedding Photo is a collection of genealogical adventure-hunting
stories culminating in meaningful successes. A visit to an abandoned
Polish Jewish cemetery in 1993 launches a 20-year search to solve the
mystery of "Who is Buried in Sarah's Tomb?" A visit with a cousin
unearths a breathtaking photo of a Berlin family wedding >from 1926 and
leads to discovering their unimaginable post-wedding history. An
archivist in Prague discovers a secret uncle whose life takes the
reader >from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to the Vatican.
A memoir by Philip Roth shocks a daughter into unlocking a father's
concealed past. In this talk, Dr. Dan Oren will share some of these
adventures and his research strategy, as applicable in genealogy as it
is in doing historical or scientific research, that open new worlds of
understanding.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dan A. Oren, M.D., associate professor
of psychiatry (adjunct) at Yale University has worked for thirty years
as a psychiatrist and faculty member at Yale and has been Visiting
Professor of Physiology at the University of Rzeszów, Poland. He is a
former research fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health.
Oren's prior books are: Joining The Club: A History of Jews and Yale
and How to Beat Jet Lag: A Practical Guide for Air Travelers. He is
author or co-author of numerous scientific articles. His scientific
interest centers on the mechanism of light's antidepressant effects in
treating Seasonal Affective Disorder. He is married to artist Jeanette
Kuvin Oren, and has two children and one grandchild. He has been
tracing his genealogy for more than forty years.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy:
Meetings and most events are free to JGSGW members. Non-members may
attend for a fee of $5. If they decide to join JGSGW at the meeting or
event, the $5 will be applied toward membership. Members who require
personal assistance due to a health condition or disability may bring
an assistant at no charge.

Nancy C. Kotz
VP Communications, JGSGW
http://www.jgsgw.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen May 6, 2019 - Celebrate Jewish-American Heritage Month at the Library of Congress #general

N. Kotz
 

In observance of Jewish American Heritage Month, and in cooperation
with the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, Dr. Dan A.
Oren will present on his book titled "Joining the Club: A History of
Jews and Yale."

Between the 1920s and early 1960s, Yale had an unwritten 10% quota on
Jewish students. Beginning in 1809 there were Jewish students at Yale
however they were few in number and easily incorporated into a
generally tolerant community. But by the 1920s 10% of undergrads were
Jewish and the Jewish applicant pool was expanding. Yale did not want
to be seen as a Jewish college and thus loose the patronage of the
upper class to Harvard.

Dr. Oren tells the story of Jews at Yale very comprehensively and
expands his writing to include philosophical issues related to racial
and ethnic groups who continue to feel excluded by universities who
see a "balanced" class as their goal.

Details are available at
https://www.loc.gov/item/event-394953/joining-the-club-a-history-of-jews-and-yale/2019-05-06/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://tinyurl.com/yxv5o3sm ]

Nancy C. Kotz
VP Communications, JGSGW
http://www.jgsgw.org


(Belarus) Belarus Building Site Yields the Bones of 1214 Holocaust Victims #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An April 27,2019 article in the New York Times relates how a Brest, Belarus
building site yielded the bones of 1,214 Holocaust victims. Construction
workers who had been working on foundations for a new apartment building
along with soldiers pulled human skeletons >from the earth. Over the three
months since this excavation of bodies began the bones of 1214 people, are
thought to be Jews slaughtered by the Nazis, when Hitler invaded Russia. At
the time Belarus was part of Russia.

The construction was stopped partly due to the condemnation by the World
Jewish Congress who called the construction project "an affront to the
memories of the Jewish residents of the city who were shot and murdered at
that very site." Before World War ll, Jews represented half of the city of
Brest's population of 60,000. The Brest Jews were thought to have been
killed in a forest about 70 miles east of the city. While it was known that
some massacres against Jews occurred in the center of the city the number
was thought to be far less than the 1, 214. It is thought these were Jews
who had initially hid or fled but were then captured by the Nazis after the
ghetto was destroyed in October 1942.

The Soviet army reconquered Brest in 1944, but by then only a handful of
Jews remained. One of them was future Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin.

There is controversy about whether the luxury apartment building should
still be built on the site or whether it should be fenced off and turned
into a "memorial park" for the Jews who were murdered.

To read the article see:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/27/world/europe/belarus-holocaust-mass-grave
.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Belarus SIG #Belarus (Belarus) Belarus Building Site Yields the Bones of 1214 Holocaust Victims #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An April 27,2019 article in the New York Times relates how a Brest, Belarus
building site yielded the bones of 1,214 Holocaust victims. Construction
workers who had been working on foundations for a new apartment building
along with soldiers pulled human skeletons >from the earth. Over the three
months since this excavation of bodies began the bones of 1214 people, are
thought to be Jews slaughtered by the Nazis, when Hitler invaded Russia. At
the time Belarus was part of Russia.

The construction was stopped partly due to the condemnation by the World
Jewish Congress who called the construction project "an affront to the
memories of the Jewish residents of the city who were shot and murdered at
that very site." Before World War ll, Jews represented half of the city of
Brest's population of 60,000. The Brest Jews were thought to have been
killed in a forest about 70 miles east of the city. While it was known that
some massacres against Jews occurred in the center of the city the number
was thought to be far less than the 1, 214. It is thought these were Jews
who had initially hid or fled but were then captured by the Nazis after the
ghetto was destroyed in October 1942.

The Soviet army reconquered Brest in 1944, but by then only a handful of
Jews remained. One of them was future Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin.

There is controversy about whether the luxury apartment building should
still be built on the site or whether it should be fenced off and turned
into a "memorial park" for the Jews who were murdered.

To read the article see:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/27/world/europe/belarus-holocaust-mass-grave
.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


ViewMate translation request - Polish #galicia

Hazel Boon
 

I've posted a birth record on ViewMate. It is in chart form. I believe
that the birth year is 1907 although the JRI-Poland index states 1910
(perhaps the year of registration?). I would love to have a complete
translation including all names, dates, places, house numbers and
professions. Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate
application.

VM73059
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73059

My thanks to JRI-Poland for the indexing of so many records and then
placing them online for our use. And many thanks to all who offer
assistance.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada

Researching: HABER - Burshtyn, Konyushki & Zurow, Galicia, NYC;
STARK - Bobrka, Galicia, NYC; BELY - Rzeszow, Galicia; SCHWARZ -
Burshtyn, Galicia; MONDSCHEIN - Brod, Galicia; SADOVSKI /
SADOWSKY - Belchatow & Lodz, Poland, NYC; KANET / KANOT /
KANNETT / KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC


ViewMate translation request - Polish #general

Hazel Boon
 

I've posted a birth record on ViewMate. It is in chart form. I believe that the
birth year is 1907 although the JRI-Poland index states 1910 (perhaps the year
of registration?). I would love to have a complete translation including all
names, dates, places, house numbers and professions. Please respond via the
form provided in the ViewMate application.

VM73059
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73059

My thanks to JRI-Poland for the indexing of so many records and then placing
them online for our use. And many thanks to all who offer assistance.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada

Researching: HABER - Burshtyn, Konyushki & Zurow, Galicia, NYC; STARK
- Bobrka,Galicia, NYC; BELY - Rzeszow, Galicia; SCHWARZ - Burshtyn,
Galicia; MONDSCHEIN - Brod, Galicia; SADOVSKI/SADOWSKY - Belchatow &
Lodz, Poland, NYC;KANET/KANOT/KANNETT/KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC